Thomas T. Hoopes Prize

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The Hoopes Prize is an award given annually to Harvard University undergraduates. The prize was endowed by Thomas T. Hoopes, Class of 1919 [1]

Harvard University Private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with about 6,700 undergraduate students and about 15,250 postgraduate students. Established in 1636 and named for its first benefactor, clergyman John Harvard, Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning. Its history, influence, wealth, and academic reputation have made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world. It has often been cited as the world's top university by most publishers.

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Awarded for outstanding scholarly work or research by students, recipients are selected by a committee of faculty from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, representing the three branches of study—the humanities, the natural sciences, and the social sciences. All submissions must be nominated for consideration by the project's advisor. Winning students and their advisors both receive cash awards.

Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard is the largest of the twelve faculties that constitute Harvard University.

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References

  1. "Hoopes Prize". Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2018-05-03.

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