Thomas W. Eadie Medal

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The Thomas W. Eadie Medal is an award of the Royal Society of Canada "for contributions in engineering and applied science". It is named in honour of Thomas Wardrope Eadie and is awarded annually. The award consists of a bronze medal and C$3,000 of cash. [1] The award appears to have been discontinued.

Contents

Recipients

The following people received the Thomas W. Eadie Medal: [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Thomas W. Eadie Medal". The Royal Society of Canada. Retrieved September 25, 2011.