Thomas Wickham

Last updated

Thomas Wickham
Personal information
Full nameThomas Provis Wickham
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
1851 Marylebone Cricket Club
1850 Hampshire
Career statistics
Competition FC
Matches2
Runs scored14
Batting average 4.66
100s/50s/
Top score10
Balls bowled
Wickets
Bowling average
5 wickets in innings
10 wickets in match
Best bowling
Catches/stumpings /
Source: Cricinfo, 29 April 2010

Thomas Provis Wickham (born 1810 in Weymouth, Dorset; died on 1 March 1890 in Machynlleth), probably best known as an English cricketer.

Weymouth, Dorset town in Dorset, England

Weymouth is a seaside town in Dorset, England, situated on a sheltered bay at the mouth of the River Wey on the English Channel coast. The town is 11 kilometres (7 mi) south of Dorchester and 8 kilometres (5 mi) north of the Isle of Portland. The town's population is 52,323 (2011). Weymouth has a metropolitan population of 71,083 (2016). The town is the third largest settlement in Dorset after the unitary authorities of Bournemouth and Poole.

Machynlleth town in Powys, Wales

Machynlleth, sometimes referred to colloquially as Mach, is a market town, community and electoral ward in Powys, Wales and within the historic boundaries of Montgomeryshire. It is in the Dyfi Valley at the intersection of the A487 and the A489 roads. At the 2001 Census it had a population of 2,147, rising to 2,235 in 2011.

Cricket Team sport played with bats and balls

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at the wicket with the bat, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each player. Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground. When ten players have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

Contents

Personal life

Wickham was the son of the reverend William Wickham and Margaret Provis, [1] and brother of the reverend William Provis Trelawney Wickham (Rector of Shepton Mallet, the building of the Wickham Almshouses by his widow, was made possible by a bequest from his will). [2] [3] He had two sisters, Annabella (who married James Bennett, Sheriff of Somerset) and Caroline. [4]

A rector is, in an ecclesiastical sense, a cleric who functions as an administrative leader in some Christian denominations. In contrast, a vicar is also a cleric but functions as an assistant and representative of an administrative leader. The term comes from the Latin for the helmsman of a ship.

Shepton Mallet small town in Somerset, England

Shepton Mallet is a town and civil parish in the Mendip District of Somerset, South West England, about 18 miles (29 km) south of Bristol and 5 miles (8.0 km) east of Wells. The town has an estimated population of 10,369. It houses the headquarters of Mendip District Council. The Mendip Hills lie to the north. The River Sheppey runs through the town, as does the route of the Fosse Way, the main Roman road into south-west England. There is evidence of Roman settlement. It contains a medieval parish church and a many other listed buildings. Shepton Mallet Prison was England's oldest until its closure in March 2013. The wool trade, important in the medieval economy, was replaced by industries such as brewing in the 18th century. The town remains a prominent producer of cider. Shepton Mallet is the closest town to the Glastonbury Festival. Also nearby is the Royal Bath and West of England Society show ground.

According to Bernard Burke [5] the Wickhams (of Horsington) were an ancient Somerset family, belonging to the landed gentry.

Bernard Burke British officer of arms and genealogist

Sir John Bernard Burke, was a British genealogist and Ulster King of Arms, who helped publish Burke's Peerage.

Horsington, Somerset village and parish in Somerset, England

Horsington is a village and parish in Somerset, England, situated 4 miles (6.4 km) south of Wincanton and 1 mile (1.6 km) north of Templecombe in the South Somerset district. The village lies on the edge of Horsington Marsh, part of the Blackmore Vale. In 2011 the population of the Parish, which includes the adjoining hamlets of Peckholdsash and Wilkin Throop and the village of South Cheriton was 571.

Landed gentry largely historical British social class, consisting of land owners who could live entirely off rental income

The landed gentry, or simply the gentry, is a largely historical British social class consisting in theory of landowners who could live entirely from rental income, or at least had a country estate. It was distinct from, and socially "below", the aristocracy or peerage, although in fact some of the landed gentry were wealthier than some peers, and many gentry were related to peers. They often worked as administrators of their own lands, while others became public, political, religious, and armed forces figures. The decline of this privileged class largely stemmed from the 1870s agricultural depression; however, there are still a large number of hereditary gentry in the UK to this day, many of whom transferred their landlord style management skills after the agricultural depression into the business of land agency, the act of buying and selling land.

In 1835 he married Sarah Hussey.

Little is known about him other than that he was a "gentleman". It is suggested that he spent some time in a debtors' prison. [6]

Debtors prison prison for people who are unable to pay debt

A debtors' prison is a prison for people who are unable to pay debt. Through the mid 19th century, debtors' prisons were a common way to deal with unpaid debt in places like Western Europe. Destitute persons who were unable to pay a court-ordered judgment would be incarcerated in these prisons until they had worked off their debt via labor or secured outside funds to pay the balance. The product of their labor went towards both the costs of their incarceration and their accrued debt. Increasing access and lenience throughout the history of bankruptcy law have made prison terms for unaggravated indigence illegal over most of the world.

Cricket

Wickham made his first-class debut and his only appearance for Hampshire against an All-England Eleven in 1850. In 1851, Wickham made his last first class appearance for the Marylebone Cricket Club against Cambridge University.

First-class cricket is an official classification of the highest-standard international or domestic matches in the sport of cricket. A first-class match is of three or more days' scheduled duration between two sides of eleven players each and is officially adjudged to be worthy of the status by virtue of the standard of the competing teams. Matches must allow for the teams to play two innings each although, in practice, a team might play only one innings or none at all.

Hampshire county cricket teams have been traced back to the 18th century but the county's involvement in cricket goes back much further than that. Given that the first definite mention of cricket anywhere in the world is dated c.1550 in Guildford, in neighbouring Surrey, it is almost certain that the game had reached Hampshire by the 16th century.

Marylebone Cricket Club english Cricket Club

Marylebone Cricket Club is a cricket club founded in 1787 and based since 1814 at Lord's cricket ground, which it owns, in St John's Wood, London, England. The club was formerly the governing body of cricket in England and Wales and, as the sport's legislator, held considerable global influence.

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References

  1. A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, Enjoying Territorial Possessions Or High Official Rank: But Uninvested with Heritable Honours; Burke, John; Volume 4; 1838; p597
  2. Alumni of Oxford University 1715-1886; vol 4; p1549
  3. The Wickham Almshouses on the Shepton Mallet United Charities website
  4. The Gentleman's Magazine, Volumes 173-174; May 1843; p545
  5. A genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry of Great Britain & Ireland; Burke, Bernard; Volume 2; p 354
  6. Court for the relieve of insolvent debtors, Saturday 6 June 1857 in the online version of The London Gazette; 9 June 1857; p 2047