The London Gazette

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The London Gazette
London-gazette.png
A London Gazette reprint of its front page from 3–10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London
Format Broadsheet
Founded7 November 1665
Language English
Headquarters United Kingdom
Website www.thegazette.co.uk

The London Gazette is one of the official journals of record of the British government, and the most important among such official journals in the United Kingdom, in which certain statutory notices are required to be published. The London Gazette claims to be the oldest surviving English newspaper and the oldest continuously published newspaper in the UK, having been first published on 7 November 1665 as The Oxford Gazette. [lower-alpha 1] [2] This claim is also made by the Stamford Mercury (1712) and Berrow's Worcester Journal (1690), because The Gazette is not a conventional newspaper offering general news coverage. It does not have a large circulation.

Newspaper of record

A newspaper of record is a major newspaper that has a large circulation and whose editorial and news-gathering functions are considered professional and typically authoritative. A newspaper of record may also be a publicly available newspaper that has been authorised or maintained by a government to publish public or legal notices, and therefore serves as a "newspaper of public record".

The Stamford Mercury based in Stamford, England, claims to be "Britain's oldest continuously published newspaper title". The Mercury has been published since 1712 but its masthead formerly claimed it was established in 1695 and that it was "Britain's Oldest Newspaper".

Berrow's Worcester Journal is a weekly freesheet tabloid newspaper, based in Worcester, England. Owned by Newsquest, the newspaper is delivered across central and southern Worcestershire county.

Contents

Other official newspapers of the UK government are The Edinburgh Gazette and The Belfast Gazette , which, apart from reproducing certain materials of nationwide interest published in The London Gazette, also contain publications specific to Scotland and Northern Ireland, respectively.

The Edinburgh Gazette, along with The London Gazette and The Belfast Gazette, is an official newspaper of the United Kingdom government. The Stationery Office (TSO) is published on behalf of Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO) in Edinburgh, Scotland.

The Belfast Gazette, along with The London Gazette and The Edinburgh Gazette, is an official newspaper of the United Kingdom government. It is published by The Stationery Office (TSO), on behalf of Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO) in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Scotland Country in Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. Sharing a border with England to the southeast, Scotland is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, by the North Sea to the northeast and by the Irish Sea to the south. In addition to the mainland, situated on the northern third of the island of Great Britain, Scotland has over 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

In turn, The London Gazette carries not only notices of UK-wide interest, but also those relating specifically to entities or people in England and Wales. However, certain notices that are only of specific interest to Scotland or Northern Ireland are also required to be published in The London Gazette.

The London, Edinburgh and Belfast Gazettes are published by TSO (The Stationery Office) on behalf of Her Majesty's Stationery Office. They are subject to Crown copyright.

The Stationery Office British publishing company

The Stationery Office (TSO) is a British publishing company created in 1996 when the publishing arm of Her Majesty's Stationery Office was privatised. It is the official publisher and the distributor for legislation, command and house papers, select committee reports, Hansard, and the London, Edinburgh and Belfast Gazettes, the UK government's three official journals of record. With more than 9,000 titles in print and digital formats published every year, it is one of the UK's largest publishers by volume.

Crown copyright is a form of copyright claim used by the governments of a number of Commonwealth realms. It provides special copyright rules for the Crown, i.e. government departments and (generally) state entities."Copyright protects original expression in literary, dramatic, musical and artistic works". Each and every single Commonwealth realm has its own distinct Crown copyright regulations. There are therefore no common regulations that applies to all or a number of those countries. There are some considerations being made in Canada, U.K., Australia and New Zealand regarding the "reuse of Crown-copyrighted material, through new licenses".

Current publication

The London Gazette is published each weekday, except for bank holidays. Notices for the following, among others, are published:

A bank holiday is a public holiday in the United Kingdom, some Commonwealth countries, Hong Kong and the Republic of Ireland. There is no automatic right to time off on these days, but banks close and the majority of the working population is granted time off work or extra pay for working on these days, depending on their contract. The first official bank holidays were the four days named in the Bank Holidays Act 1871, but today the term is also commonly used for Good Friday and Christmas Day, which were already public holidays under common law and therefore not official bank holidays in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland.

Royal assent formal approval of a proposed law in monarchies

Royal assent is the method by which a monarch formally approves an act of the legislature. In some jurisdictions, royal assent is equivalent to promulgation, while in others that is a separate step. Under a modern constitutional monarchy royal assent is considered to be little more than a formality; even in those nations which still, in theory, permit the monarch to withhold assent to laws, the monarch almost never does so, save in a dire political emergency or upon the advice of their government. While the power to veto a law by withholding royal assent was once exercised often by European monarchs, such an occurrence has been very rare since the eighteenth century.

Parliament of the United Kingdom supreme legislative body of the United Kingdom

The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known internationally as the UK Parliament, British Parliament, or Westminster Parliament, and domestically simply as Parliament, is the supreme legislative body of the United Kingdom, the Crown dependencies and the British Overseas Territories. It alone possesses legislative supremacy and thereby ultimate power over all other political bodies in the UK and the overseas territories. Parliament is bicameral but has three parts, consisting of the Sovereign, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons. The two houses meet in the Palace of Westminster in the City of Westminster, one of the inner boroughs of the capital city, London.

Scottish Parliament Devolved parliament of Scotland

The Scottish Parliament is the devolved unicameral legislature of Scotland. Located in the Holyrood area of the capital city, Edinburgh, it is frequently referred to by the metonym Holyrood.

Her Majesty's Stationery Office has digitised all issues of the Gazette, and these are available online. [3]

The official Gazettes are published by The Stationery Office. The content, apart from insolvency notices, is available in a number of machine-readable formats, including XML (delivery by email/FTP) and XML/RDFa via Atom feed. [4]

History

The London Gazette, dated 14-17 May 1705 detailing the return of John Leake from Gibraltar after the Battle of Cabrita Point. London Gazette(1705).jpg
The London Gazette, dated 14–17 May 1705 detailing the return of John Leake from Gibraltar after the Battle of Cabrita Point.

The London Gazette was first published as The Oxford Gazette on 7 November 1665. Charles II and the Royal Court had moved to Oxford to escape the Great Plague of London, and courtiers were unwilling to touch London newspapers for fear of contagion. The Gazette was "Published by Authority" by Henry Muddiman, and its first publication is noted by Samuel Pepys in his diary. The King returned to London as the plague dissipated, and the Gazette moved too, with the first issue of The London Gazette (labelled No. 24) being published on 5 February 1666. [5] The Gazette was not a newspaper in the modern sense: it was sent by post to subscribers, not printed for sale to the general public.

Her Majesty's Stationery Office took over the publication of the Gazette in 1889. Publication of the Gazette was transferred to the private sector, under government supervision, in the 1990s, when HMSO was sold and renamed The Stationery Office.

"Gazetted"

In time of war, despatches from the various conflicts are published in The London Gazette. People referred to are said to have been mentioned in despatches. When members of the armed forces are promoted, and these promotions are published here, the person is said to have been "gazetted".

Being "gazetted" (or "in the gazette") sometimes also meant having official notice of one's bankruptcy published,[ citation needed ] as in the classic ten-line poem comparing the stolid tenant farmer of 1722 to the lavishly spending faux-genteel farmers of 1822: [6]

Man to the plough / Wife to the cow
Girl to the yarn / Boy to the barn
And your rent will be netted.

Man tally-ho / Miss piano
Wife silk and satin / Boy Greek and Latin
And you'll all be Gazetted .

Notices of engagement and marriage were also formerly published in the Gazette.

Colonial gazettes

Gazettes, modelled on The London Gazette, were issued for most British colonial possessions.

See also

Notes

  1. Until 1752 and the changes introduced by Calendar (New Style) Act 1750, the Gazette was published with a dateline based on the Julian calendar with the start of year as 25 March. Modern secondary sources usually adjust the start of the calendar year during this period to 1 January. Using this adjustment a London Gazette issue dated 4 January 1723 was published in 1724, the same year as an issue published on 4 April 1724 (See the article Old Style and New Style dates). [1]

Related Research Articles

History of British newspapers

The history of British newspapers dates to the 17th century with the emergence of regular publications covering news and gossip. The relaxation of government censorship in the late 17th century led to a rise in publications, which in turn led to an increase in regulation throughout the 18th century. The Times began publication in 1785 and became the leading newspaper of the early 19th century, before the lifting of taxes on newspapers and technological innovations led to a boom in newspaper publishing in the late 19th century. Mass education and increasing affluence led to new papers such as the Daily Mail emerging at the end of the 19th century, aimed at lower middle-class readers.

The Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI) is the body responsible for the operation of Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO) and of other public information services of the United Kingdom. The OPSI is part of the National Archives of the United Kingdom and is responsible for Crown copyright.

<i>Official Journal of the European Union</i> public journal

The Official Journal of the European Union is the official gazette of record for the European Union (EU). It is published every working day in all of the official languages of the member states. Only legal acts published in the Official Journal are binding.

The Dublin Gazette was the gazette, or official newspaper, of the Irish Executive, Britain's government in Ireland based at Dublin Castle, between 1705 and 1922. It published notices of government business, including Royal Proclamations, the granting of Royal Assent to bills, writs of election, appointments to public offices, commissions and promotions in the Armed Forces, and awards of honours, as well as notices of insolvency, and of changes of names or of arms.

<i>Iris Oifigiúil</i>

Iris Oifigiúil is the official gazette of the Government of Ireland. It replaced The Dublin Gazette, the gazette of the Dublin Castle administration, on 31 January 1922. The Belfast Gazette was established for the same purpose in the newly created Northern Ireland on 7 June 1921.

A gazette is an official journal, a newspaper of record, or simply a newspaper.

The Gazette may refer to:

The Queen's Printer is typically a bureau of the national, state, or provincial government responsible for producing official documents issued by the Queen-in-Council, ministers of the Crown, or other departments. The position is defined by letters patent under the royal prerogative in various Commonwealth realms.

Charles Duke Yonge was an English historian, classicist and cricketer. He wrote numerous works of modern history, and translated several classical works. His younger brother was George Edward Yonge.

Events from the year 1665 in England.

In many countries, a statutory instrument is a form of delegated legislation.

The Chronological Table of the Statutes is a chronological list of the public Acts passed by the Parliament of England (1235–1706), the Parliament of Great Britain (1707–1800), and the Parliament of the United Kingdom, as well as the Acts of the old Parliament of Scotland and of the modern Scottish Parliament, and the Measures passed by the National Assembly for Wales and by the General Synod of the Church of England. It is produced by Her Majesty's Stationery Office and published by The Stationery Office.

Burney Collection of Newspapers

The Burney Collection consists of over 1,270 17th-18th century newspapers and other news materials, gathered by Charles Burney, most notable for the 18th-century London newspapers. The original collection, totalling almost 1 million pages, is held by the British Library.

Samuel Haliday or Hollyday (1685–1739) was an Irish Presbyterian non-subscribing minister, to the "first congregation" of Belfast.

The Sri Lanka Gazette, officially The Gazette of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, (Sinhalese: ශ්‍රී ලංකා ප්‍රජාතාන්ත්‍රික සමාජවාදී ජනරජයේ ගැසට් පත්‍රය, translit. Shrī Laṁkā Prajātāntrika Samājavādī Janarajayē Gæsaṭ Patraya; Tamil: இலங்கை ஜனநாயக சோசலிச குடியரசின் வர்த்தமானி, translit. Ilaṅkai Jaṉanāyaka Cōcalica Kuṭiyaraciṉ Varttamāṉi) is a public journal of the Government of Sri Lanka. It prints certain statutory notices from the government. Modeled after the Oxford Gazette, the Sri Lanka Gazette is the oldest surviving newspaper in Sri Lanka, having been published continuously since 1802. Unlike other newspapers, it does not cover general news or have a large circulation. It is printed by the Department of Government Printing.

Benjamin Bryant Royal Navy submarine commander

Rear Admiral Benjamin Bryant was a Royal Navy officer noted for his submarine exploits during World War II. In terms of ships sunk, Bryant was the most successful British submarine ace to survive the war.. He was appointed Deputy Chief of Naval Personnel, (Training) from July 1954 to February 1957,

References

  1. "No. 6231". The London Gazette . 4 January 1723. p. 1.; "No. 6257". The London Gazette . 4 April 1724. p. 1.
  2. "No. 1". The Oxford Gazette . 7 November 1665. p. 1.
  3. Search the London Gazette Archive
  4. "Data Re-use". The London Gazette. Retrieved 10 December 2015.
  5. "No. 24". The London Gazette . 5 February 1666. p. 1.
  6. By William Hone (1827); published by Hunt and Clarke.