Stumped

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Indian wicketkeeper M. S. Dhoni appeals for a stumping against Australian batsman Matthew Hayden. Hayden and Dhoni.jpg
Indian wicketkeeper M. S. Dhoni appeals for a stumping against Australian batsman Matthew Hayden.

Stumped is a method of dismissing a batsman in cricket, which involves the wicket-keeper putting down the wicket while the batsman is out of his ground. [1] (The batsman leaves his ground when he has moved down the pitch beyond the popping crease, usually in an attempt to hit the ball). The action of stumping can only be performed by a wicket-keeper, and can only occur from a legitimate delivery (i.e. not a no-ball), while the batsman is not attempting a run; it is a special case of a run out.

Contents

Being "out of his ground" is defined as not having any part of the batsman's body or his bat touching the ground behind the crease – i.e., if his bat is slightly elevated from the floor despite being behind the crease, or if his foot is on the crease line itself but not completely across it and touching the ground behind it, then he would be considered out (if stumped). One of the fielding team (such as the wicket-keeper himself) must appeal for the wicket by asking the umpire. The appeal is normally directed to the square-leg umpire, who would be in the best position to adjudicate on the appeal.

Stumping

Stumping is the fifth most common form of dismissal after caught, bowled, leg before wicket and run out, [2] though it is seen more commonly in Twenty20 cricket because of its more aggressive batting. It is governed by Law 39 of the Laws of Cricket. [1] It is usually seen with a medium or slow bowler (in particular, a spin bowler), as with fast bowlers a wicket-keeper takes the ball too far back from the wicket to attempt a stumping. It often includes co-operation between a bowler and wicket-keeper: the bowler draws the batsman out of his ground (such as by delivering a ball with a shorter length to make the batsman step forward to hit it on the bounce), and the wicket-keeper catches and breaks the wicket before the batsman realises he has missed the ball and makes his ground, i.e. places the bat or part of his body on the ground back behind the popping crease. If the bails are removed before the wicket-keeper has the ball, the batsman can still be stumped if the wicket-keeper removes one of the stumps from the ground, while holding the ball in his hand. The bowler is credited for the batsman's wicket, and the wicket-keeper is credited for the dismissal. A batsman may be out stumped off a wide delivery [3] but cannot be stumped off a no-ball as bowler is credited for the wicket.

Notes:

Records

Most international stumpings – career
FormatStumpingsPlayerMatches
Test52 Bert Oldfield 54
ODI123 Mahendra Singh Dhoni 350
T20I34 Mahendra Singh Dhoni 98

Last updated: 25 August 2019 [5] [6] [7]

Related Research Articles

In cricket, an umpire is a person who has the authority to make decisions about events on the cricket field, according to the Laws of Cricket. Besides making decisions about legality of delivery, appeals for wickets and general conduct of the game in a legal manner, the umpire also keeps a record of the deliveries and announces the completion of an over.

The Laws of Cricket is a code which specifies the rules of the game of cricket worldwide. The earliest known code was drafted in 1744 and, since 1788, it has been owned and maintained by its custodian, the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) in London. There are currently 42 Laws which outline all aspects of how the game is to be played. MCC has re-coded the Laws six times, the seventh and latest code being released in October 2017. The 2nd edition of the 2017 Code came into force on 1 April 2019. The first six codes prior to 2017 were all subject to interim revisions and so exist in more than one version.

Wicket-keeper Fielding position in cricket

The wicket-keeper in the sport of cricket is the player on the fielding side who stands behind the wicket or stumps being watchful of the batsman and ready to take a catch, stump the batsman out and run out a batsman when occasion arises. The wicket-keeper is the only member of the fielding side permitted to wear gloves and external leg guards. The role of the keeper is governed by Law 27 of the Laws of Cricket.

Wicket One of the two sets of three stumps and two bails at either end of a cricket pitch

In cricket, the term wicket has several meanings:

Glossary of cricket terms

This is a general glossary of the terminology used in the sport of cricket. Where words in a sentence are also defined elsewhere in this article, they appear in italics. Certain aspects of cricket terminology are explained in more detail in cricket statistics and the naming of fielding positions is explained at fielding (cricket).

In cricket, a no-ball is a type of illegal delivery to a batter. It is also a type of extra, being the run awarded to the batting team as a consequence of the illegal delivery. For most cricket games, especially amateur the definition of all forms of no-ball is from the MCC Laws of Cricket.

In the sport of cricket, the crease is a certain area demarcated by white lines painted or chalked on the field of play, and pursuant to the rules of cricket they help determine legal play in different ways for the fielding and batting side. They define the area within which the batsmen and bowlers operate. The term crease may refer to any of the lines themselves, particularly the popping crease, or to the region that they demark. Law 7 of the Laws of Cricket governs the size and position of the crease markings, and defines the actual line as the back edge of the width of the marked line on the grass, i.e., the edge nearest to the wicket at that end.

Dismissal (cricket) End to a teams batting period

In cricket, a dismissal occurs when a batsman's period of batting is brought to an end by the opposing team. It is also known as the batsman being out, the batting side losing a wicket, and the fielding side taking a wicket. The ball becomes dead, and the dismissed batsman must leave the field of play permanently for the rest of their team's innings, and is replaced by a teammate. A team's innings ends if 10 of the 11 team members are dismissed—as players bat in pairs, when only one player is not out it is not possible for the team to bat any longer. This is known as bowling out the batting team, who are said to be all out.

Run (cricket) Unit of scoring in cricket

In cricket, a run is the unit of scoring. The team with the most runs wins in many versions of the game, and always draws at worst, except for some results decided by the DLS method, which is used in limited overs games when the two teams have had different opportunities to score runs.

Obstructing the field is one of the ten methods of dismissing a batsman in the sport of cricket. Either batsman can be given out if he wilfully attempts to obstruct or distract the fielding side by word or action. It is Law 37 of the Laws of cricket, and is a rare way for a batsman to be dismissed; in the history of cricket, there has been only one instance in Test matches, six occasions in One Day International (ODI) games, and only one instance in Twenty20 International matches. There have also been seven instances in Test cricket, and two in ODIs, where a batsman has been dismissed handled the ball, a mode of dismissal now folded into obstructing the field.

Caught Cricket dismissal method; the ball does not hit the ground after it is batted

Caught is a method of dismissing a batsman in cricket. A batsman is out caught if the batsman hits the ball, from a legitimate delivery, with the bat, and the ball is caught by the bowler or a fielder before it hits the ground.

Run out Method of dismissal in cricket

Run out is a method of dismissal in cricket, governed by Law 38 of the Laws of Cricket.

References

  1. 1 2 "Law 39 (Stumped)". Marylebone Cricket Club. 2013. Retrieved 5 January 2017.
  2. "Analysing Test dismissals across the ages". ESPN Cricinfo. 18 January 2013. Retrieved 5 January 2017.
  3. "Ask Steven: Cricketing MPs, and stumped off a wide". www.espncricinfo.com. Retrieved 10 September 2020.
  4. "Law 38 – Run out". MCC. Retrieved 17 September 2020.
  5. "Test matches – Wicketkeeping records – Most stumpings in career". Cricinfo. ESPN. Retrieved 8 January 2017.
  6. "One Day International matches – Wicketkeeping records – Most stumpings in career". Cricinfo. ESPN. Retrieved 8 January 2017.
  7. "Twenty20 International matches – Wicketkeeping records – Most stumpings in career". Cricinfo. ESPN. Retrieved 8 January 2017.