Thomas de Baumburgh

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Thomas de Baumburgh (fl. 1332) was an English official, clerk of the chancery and keeper of the great seal. He is mentioned in 1328 as then holding the living of Emildon in Northumberland, to which he had been presented by the king.

Chancery is a general term for a medieval writing office, responsible for the production of official documents. The title of chancellor, for the head of the office, came to be held by important ministers in a number of states, and remains the title of the heads of government in modern Germany and Austria. Chancery hand is a term for various types of handwriting associated with chanceries.

Northumberland County of England

Northumberland is a county in North East England. The northernmost county of England, it borders Cumbria to the west, County Durham and Tyne and Wear to the south and the Scottish Borders to the north. To the east is the North Sea coastline with a 64 miles (103 km) path. The county town is Alnwick, although the County council is based in Morpeth.

Biography

In 1332 he was receiver of petitions from England in the parliament, as also in 1340. Between 1 April and 23 June 1332 he was one of the keepers of the great seal, and again between 13 January and 17 February 1334, John de Stratford, bishop of Winchester, being chancellor on both occasions. He again held this important office between 6 and 19 July 1338, during the chancellorship of Richard de Bynteworth, bishop of London, and once more upon that chancellor's death between 8 December 1339 and 16 Feb. 1340, during which period the chancellorship was vacant. After this date no more is heard of him. He held land at Baumburgh (now Bamborough) in Northumberland, whence his name.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

John de Stratford 14th-century Archbishop of Canterbury, Treasurer and Chancellor of England

John de Stratford was Archbishop of Canterbury, Bishop of Winchester, Treasurer and Chancellor of England.

Bishop of Winchester Diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Bishop of Winchester is the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Winchester in the Church of England. The bishop's seat (cathedra) is at Winchester Cathedral in Hampshire.

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References

    Wikisource-logo.svg  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : "Baumburgh, Thomas de". Dictionary of National Biography . London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 

    The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply. Those rights may have expired, been forfeited, expressly waived, or may be inapplicable.

    <i>Dictionary of National Biography</i> multi-volume reference work

    The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published since 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.