Thomas de Dent

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Dent, Cumbria, birthplace of Thomas de Dent, present day Main Street, Dent.jpg
Dent, Cumbria, birthplace of Thomas de Dent, present day

Thomas de Dent (died after 1361) was an English born cleric and judge who held high office in Ireland.

He was born at Dent, Cumbria. [1] He took holy orders. He is first heard of as defendant in a lawsuit for trespass at Ingleton, North Yorkshire. [1]

Dent, Cumbria village and civil parish in Cumbria, England

Dent is a village and civil parish in Cumbria, England. It lies in Dentdale, a narrow valley on the western slopes of the Pennines within the Yorkshire Dales National Park. It is about 6 kilometres (4 mi) south east of Sedbergh and about 13 kilometres (8 mi) north east of Kirkby Lonsdale.

Holy orders sacraments of the Catholic Church

In the Christian churches, holy orders are ordained ministries such as bishop, priest, or deacon, and the sacrament or rite by which candidates are ordained to those orders. Churches recognizing these orders include the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, Assyrian, Old Catholic, Independent Catholic and some Lutheran churches. Except for Lutherans and some Anglicans, these churches regard ordination as a sacrament. The Anglo-Catholic tradition within Anglicanism identifies more with the Roman Catholic position about the sacramental nature of ordination.

Trespass is an area of criminal law or tort law broadly divided into three groups: trespass to the person, trespass to chattels and trespass to land.

He came to Ireland as King's Attorney (the office which was later called Serjeant-at-law) in 1331 and in 1334 he was appointed a justice of the Court of Common Pleas (Ireland). [2] He transferred to the Court of King's Bench (Ireland) in 1337. He became Lord Chief Justice of Ireland in 1341, as part of a widespread reform of the Irish judiciary, and was Chief Justice of the Irish Common Pleas 1344-58. [2] He was granted a lease of the royal manor of Esker, near Lucan in 1351: [1] Esker was often leased out to royal servants who were in high favour with the Crown. He is last heard of in 1361, when he was visiting England. [3] He may have been in some financial distress in his last years, judging by his petition to the English Parliament for compensation in 1358, shortly after he left office. [4]

This is a list (presently incomplete) of lawyers who held the rank of serjeant-at-law at the Irish Bar.

Court of Common Pleas (Ireland)

The Court of Common Pleas was one of the principal courts of common law in Ireland. It was a mirror image of the equivalent court in England. It was one of the four courts of justice that gave the Four Courts in Dublin its name.

Court of Kings Bench (Ireland)

The Court of King's Bench was one of the senior courts of common law in Ireland. It was a mirror of the Court of King's Bench in England. The King's Bench was one of the "Four Courts" which sat in the building in Dublin still known as "The Four Courts".

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References

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 Ball p.74
  2. 1 2 Hart p.167
  3. Hart p.74
  4. National Archives SC/8/44/2189

Sources

Francis Elrington Ball, known as F. Elrington Ball (1863–1928), was an Irish author and legal historian, best known for his work The Judges in Ireland 1221–1921 (1926).