Thomas de Hibernia

Last updated

Thomas de Hibernia (fl. 1270) was an Irish theologian.

Contents

Said to be a native of Palmerstown, County Kildare, he became a Franciscan, and Fellow of Sorbonne, Paris. In later life, he moved to Italy, dying in the "Convent of Aquila, in the Province of Penin."

County Kildare County in Leinster, Ireland

County Kildare is a county in Ireland. It is located in the province of Leinster and is part of the Mid-East Region. It is named after the town of Kildare. Kildare County Council is the local authority for the county which has a population of 222,504.

A fellow is a member of a group of learned people which works together in pursuing mutual knowledge or practice. There are many different kinds of fellowships which are awarded for different reasons in academia and industry. These often indicate a different level of scholarship.

Sorbonne historical monument

The Sorbonne is a building in the Latin Quarter of Paris which was the historical house of the former University of Paris. Today, it houses part or all of several higher education and research institutions in the Paris region.

On his death-bed he bequeathed his books and papers to the Sorbonne, "together with six pounds for the purpose of purchasing a rent to celebrate his anniversary."

Related Research Articles

College of Sorbonne former theological college of the University of Paris

The College of Sorbonne was a theological college of the University of Paris, founded in 1253 by Robert de Sorbon (1201–1274), after whom it was named. With the rest of the Paris colleges, it was suppressed during the French Revolution. It was restored in 1808 but finally closed in 1882. In recent times it came to refer to the group of academic faculties of the University of Paris, as opposed to the professional faculties of law and medicine. It is also used to refer to the main building of the University of Paris in the 5th arrondissement of Paris, which houses several faculties created when the University was divided up into thirteen autonomous universities in 1970.

University of Paris former university in Paris, France

The University of Paris, metonymically known as the Sorbonne, was a university in Paris, France, active 1150–1793, and 1806–1970.

Cardinal Richelieu French clergyman, noble and statesman

Cardinal Armand Jean du Plessis, 1st Duke of Richelieu and Fronsac, commonly referred to as Cardinal Richelieu, was a French clergyman, nobleman and statesman. He was consecrated as a bishop in 1607 and was appointed Foreign Secretary in 1616. Richelieu soon rose in both the Catholic Church and the French government, becoming a cardinal in 1622, and King Louis XIII's chief minister in 1624. He remained in office until his death in 1642; he was succeeded by Cardinal Mazarin, whose career he had fostered.

Pierre Puvis de Chavannes French painter

Pierre Puvis de Chavannes was a French painter best known for his mural painting, who came to be known as 'the painter for France'. He became the co-founder and president of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, and his work influenced many other artists, notably Robert Genin. Puvis de Chavannes was a prominent painter in the early Third Republic. Émile Zola described his work as "an art made of reason, passion, and will".

Sorbonne University university in Paris

Sorbonne University is a public research university in Paris, France, established by the merger in 2018 of Paris-Sorbonne University, Pierre et Marie Curie University, and other smaller institutions. The date 1257 on its logo refers to the Collège de Sorbonne which was founded in 1257 by Robert de Sorbon.

May 1968 events in France May 1968 civil unrest in France

The May 1968 events in France refers to the volatile period of civil unrest throughout France during May 1968 which was punctuated by demonstrations and major general strikes as well as the occupation of universities and factories across France. At its height, the events brought the economy of France almost to a halt. The protests reached such a point that political leaders feared civil war or revolution; the national government itself briefly ceased to function after President Charles de Gaulle secretly fled France for a few hours. The protests spurred an artistic movement, with songs, imaginative graffiti, posters, and slogans.

Thomas Cajetan Catholic cardinales

Thomas Cajetan, also known as Gaetanus, commonly Tommaso de Vio or Thomas de Vio, was an Italian philosopher, theologian, cardinal and the Master of the Order of Preachers 1508-18. He was a leading theologian of his day who is now best known as the spokesman for Catholic opposition to the teachings of Martin Luther and the Protestant Reformation while he was the Pope's Legate in Augsburg, and perhaps also among Catholics for his extensive commentary on the Summa Theologica of Thomas Aquinas.

Nicolas Ysambert was a French, Roman Catholic theologian, and lifelong teacher at the Sorbonne.

University of Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne French university located place du Panthéon, in Paris

University of Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne, also known as Paris 1 or Pantheon-Sorbonne University, is a multidisciplinary public research university in Paris, France.

Maximilien Rubel Marxist historian and council communist

Maximilien Rubel was a famous Marxist historian and council communist.

Paris-Sorbonne University French university

Paris-Sorbonne University was a public research university in Paris, France, active from 1971 to 2017. It was the main inheritor of the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Paris. In 2018, it was merged with Pierre and Marie Curie University and some smaller entities to forming a new university called Sorbonne University.

André Thevet French explorer

André Thevet was a French Franciscan priest, explorer, cosmographer and writer who travelled to Brazil in the 16th century. He described the country, its aboriginal inhabitants and the historical episodes involved in the France Antarctique, a French settlement in Rio de Janeiro, in his book The New Found World, or Antarctike.

Rue Saint-Jacques, Paris street in Paris, France

The Rue Saint-Jacques is a street in the Latin Quarter of Paris which lies along the cardo of Roman Lutetia. The Boulevard Saint-Michel, driven through this old quarter of Paris by Baron Haussmann, relegated the roughly parallel rue Saint-Jacques to a backstreet, but it was a main axial road of medieval Paris, as the buildings that still front it attest. It was the starting point for pilgrims leaving Paris to make their way along the chemin de St-Jacques that led eventually to Santiago de Compostela. The Paris base of the Dominican Order was established in 1218 under the leadership of Pierre Seila in the Chapelle Saint-Jacques, close to the Porte Saint-Jacques, on this street; this is why the Dominicans were called Jacobins in Paris. Thus the street's name is indirectly responsible for the Jacobin Club in the French Revolution getting that name .Johann Heynlin and Guillaume Fichet established the first printing press in France, briefly at the Sorbonne and then on this street, in the 1470s. The second printers in Paris were Peter Kayser and Johann Stohl at the sign of the Soleil d'Or in the Rue Saint-Jacques, from 1473. The proximity of the Sorbonne led many later booksellers and printers to set up shop here also.

Pierre and Marie Curie University French university

Pierre and Marie Curie University, titled as UPMC from 2007–2017 and also known as Paris 6, was a public research university in Paris, France from 1971 to 2017. The university is located on the Jussieu Campus in the Latin Quarter of the 5th arrondissement of Paris, France.

University of Orléans French university

The University of Orléans is a French university, in the Academy of Orléans and Tours. As of July 2015 it is a member of the regional university association Leonardo da Vinci consolidated University.

University of Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3

The New Sorbonne University is a public university in Paris, France.

Thomas of Ireland, known as Thomas Hibernicus, not to be confused with the Franciscan friar Thomas de Hibernia, who was an Irish writer. Thomas Hibernicus's claim to fame is not as an original author, but as an anthologist and indexer.

Charles de Condren French theologian

Charles de Condren, Cong. Orat., a Doctor of the Sorbonne,, was a French mystic of the 17th century, and is considered a leading member of the French School of Spirituality.

Jean-Baptiste Chabot was a Roman Catholic secular priest and the leading French Syriac scholar in the first half of the twentieth century.

References

    Select bibliography