Thorp Ridges

Last updated

Thorp Ridges ( 66°34′S52°51′E / 66.567°S 52.850°E / -66.567; 52.850 Coordinates: 66°34′S52°51′E / 66.567°S 52.850°E / -66.567; 52.850 ) is a three almost parallel ridges standing 18 nautical miles (33 km) west of Stor Hanakken Mountain in Enderby Land. Plotted from air photos taken from ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions) aircraft in 1956. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for A. Thorp, electrical fitter at Wilkes Station in 1961.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Enderby Land geographical object

Enderby Land is a projecting land mass of Antarctica. Its shore extends from Shinnan Glacier at about 67°55′S44°38′E to William Scoresby Bay at 67°24′S59°34′E, approximately ​124 of the earth's longitude. It was first documented in western and eastern literature in February 1831 by John Biscoe aboard the whaling brig Tula, and named after the Enderby Brothers of London, the ship's owners who encouraged their captains to combine exploration with sealing.

The Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions is the historical name for the Australian Antarctic Program (AAp) administered for Australia by the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD).

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thorp Ridges" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


Related Research Articles

Commonwealth Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Commonwealth Glacier is a glacier which flows in a southeasterly direction and enters the northern side of Taylor Valley immediately west of Mount Coleman, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was charted by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, under Robert Falcon Scott, and named by them for the Commonwealth of Australia, which made a financial grant to the BrAE and contributed two members to the Western Geological Party which explored this area. The north end of the glacier is bounded by Flint Ridge.

Prince Charles Mountains mountain range

The Prince Charles Mountains are a major group of mountains in Mac. Robertson Land in Antarctica, including the Athos Range, the Porthos Range, and the Aramis Range. The highest peak is Mount Menzies. Other prominent peaks are Mount Izabelle and Mount Stinear. These mountains together with other scattered peaks form an arc about 260 miles long, extending from the vicinity of Mount Starlight in the north to Goodspeed Nunataks in the south.

Zuniga Glacier is a glacier flowing west-northwest into Dotson Ice Shelf between Jeffrey Head and Mount Bodziony on the west side of Bear Peninsula, Walgreen Coast, Marie Byrd Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from aerial photographs taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in 1947 and U.S. Navy in 1966, it was named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Mike Zuniga, Chief Aviation Storekeeper, U.S. Navy, who made seven Deep Freeze deployments between 1960 and 1978.

Borough of Sebastopol Local government area in Victoria, Australia

The Borough of Sebastopol was a local government area about 4 kilometres (2 mi) south of the regional city of Ballarat, Victoria, Australia. The borough covered an area of 7.61 square kilometres (2.9 sq mi), and existed from 1864 until 1994.

Posadowsky Glacier (Antarctica)

Posadowsky Glacier is a glacier about 9 nautical miles long, flowing north to Posadowsky Bay immediately east of Gaussberg. Posadowsky Bay is an open embayment, located just east of the West Ice Shelf and fronting on the Davis Sea in Kaiser Wilhelm II Land. Kaiser Wilhelm II Land is the part of East Antarctica lying between Cape Penck, at 87°43'E, and Cape Filchner, at 91°54'E, and is claimed by Australia as part of the Australian Antarctic Territory. Other notable geographic features in this area include Drygalski Island, located 45 mi NNE of Cape Filchner in the Davis Sea, and Mirny Station, a Russian scientific research station.

Allen Peak

Allen Peak is a 1,880-metre (6,170 ft) peak in Antarctica, standing 5 nautical miles (9 km) west of Mount Wyatt Earp and forming the northern extremity of the main ridge of the Sentinel Range. It was discovered by Lincoln Ellsworth on his trans-Antarctic flight of 23 November 1935, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Robert J. Allen Jr., a United States Geological Survey (USGS) cartographer and Antarctic specialist, 1950–79, a consultant to the USGS Branch of International Activities from 1980, and a member of the Branch of Special Maps, who helped prepare the 1962 map of this range.

Carstens Shoal is an almost circular shoal lying just north of East Budd Island, and just west of Moller Bank, in Holme Bay, Mac. Robertson Land. It was charted in February 1961 by d'A.T. Gale, hydrographic surveyor with the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions, and named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for D.R. Carstens, surveyor at Mawson Station in 1962, who assisted the hydrographic survey in 1961.

Church Glacier is a tributary glacier, 10 nautical miles (19 km) long, flowing southward along the west side of nearby Church Ridge to enter Leander Glacier northwest of Shadow Bluff, in the Admiralty Mountains, a major mountain range situated in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Brooks D. Church, a laboratory management technician at McMurdo Station, Hut Point Peninsula, Ross Island, 1966–67 and 1967–68. The glacier lies on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Stepup Col

Stepup Col is a snow-covered north-south running col linking Broad Valley and Cugnot Ice Piedmont, between the east end of Louis Philippe Plateau and Kumata Hill, Trinity Peninsula. The name given by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) is descriptive, as 100 ft in height is gained when the col is traversed in a northerly direction.

Jupiter Amphitheatre is a steep-walled valley in the eastern Morozumi Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica. The valley is occupied by a glacier and is entered between Sickle Nunatak and Mount Van Veen. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and was named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition during the 1967–68 season. The valley lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Mount Sundberg is a pyramidal peak surmounting the central part of Thomson Massif in the Aramis Range, Prince Charles Mountains. First visited in December 1956 by the ANARE southern party led by W.G. Bewsher. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for Sgt. G. Sundberg, engine fitter with the RAAF Antarctic Flight at Mawson Station in 1956.

Trajer Ridge is a rock ridge about 125 m high at the south side of the base of Breidnes Peninsula, Vestfold Hills. The region was photographed by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump (1946–47), ANARE and the Soviet Antarctic Expedition (1956). Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for F.L. Trajer, weather observer at Davis Station (1961) who, with M. Hay, visited the feature on foot on November 4, 1961.

Mount Paish is a mountain 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) east of Mount Torckler and 27 nautical miles (50 km) southwest of Stor Hanakken Mountain in Enderby Land. It was plotted from air photos taken from ANARE aircraft in 1957 and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for P.G. Paish, a weather observer at Wilkes Station in 1961.

Edward Ridge is a gently rising, snow-covered ridge standing 13 nautical miles (24 km) northwest of Rayner Peak in Enderby Land, Antarctica. It was plotted from air photos taken from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) aircraft in 1959, and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for Edward Nash, an aircraft mechanic with ANARE, under Phillip Law in 1965.

Ghent Ridge is a ridge that parallels the south flank of Commonwealth Glacier, 0.5 nautical miles (1 km) north of Mount Falconer, in the lower Taylor Valley of Victoria Land, Antarctica. The Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition (VUWAE), 1965–66, called this feature "Smith Ridge," presumably after I. Smith, a member of the VUWAE field party, but that toponym is already in use for other features. It was therefore recommended that this ridge be named after Edward D. Ghent, leader of the 1965–66 expedition, and later with the Department of Geology, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Mount Mooney is a ridge-shaped mountain, 2,850 metres (9,350 ft) high, standing just north of the La Gorce Mountains, where it rises above the middle of Robison Glacier, in the Queen Maud Mountains of Antarctica. It was discovered in December 1934 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition geological party under Quin Blackburn, and named by Rear Admiral Byrd for James E. Mooney, who assisted this and later Byrd expeditions. From 1959 to 1965, Mooney served as Deputy United States Antarctic Projects Officer.

McLean Ridge is a small, partly ice-covered ridge about 3 nautical miles (6 km) southeast of Mount Butterworth in the Aramis Range of the Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica. It was plotted from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions air photos taken in 1956 and 1960, and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for C.V. McLean, a senior diesel mechanic at Wilkes Station in 1963.

Mount Stansfield is a mountain 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) southeast of Mount Berrigan and 20 nautical miles (37 km) west-southwest of Stor Hanakken Mountain in Enderby Land. It was plotted from air photos taken from ANARE aircraft in 1957 and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for P.B. Stansfield, the supervising radio technician at Wilkes Station in 1961.

Seavers Ridge is a rock ridge 14 nautical miles (26 km) east-southeast of Mount Renouard in Enderby Land. Plotted from air photos taken from ANARE aircraft in 1957. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for J.A. Seavers, assistant cook at Mawson Station in 1961.

Lacroix Nunatak is a ridge of terminal moraine, about 1 nautical mile (2 km) long and 75 metres (250 ft) high, standing immediately south of a small zone of low rocky ridges which protrude above the ice-covered point 2 nautical miles (4 km) southwest of Cape Margerie, Adélie Coast, Antarctica. It was discovered in 1931 by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition, and was named by Mawson after French mineralogist Alfred Lacroix. It was photographed from the air by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47, and surveyed by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1949–51, which established an astronomical control station near its center.