Enderby Land

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Location of Enderby Land (red), Australian Antarctic Territory in Antarctica Enderby Land in Australian Antarctic Territory.svg
Location of Enderby Land (red), Australian Antarctic Territory in Antarctica
Enderby Land, Antarctica. NASA MODIS image, 2011 Enderby Land, Antarctica.jpg
Enderby Land, Antarctica. NASA MODIS image, 2011

Enderby Land is a projecting landmass of Antarctica. Its shore extends from Shinnan Glacier at about 67°55′S44°38′E / 67.917°S 44.633°E / -67.917; 44.633 to William Scoresby Bay at 67°24′S59°34′E / 67.400°S 59.567°E / -67.400; 59.567 , approximately 124 of the earth's longitude. It was first documented in western and eastern literature in February 1831 by John Biscoe aboard the whaling brig Tula, and named after the Enderby Brothers of London, the ship's owners who encouraged their captains to combine exploration with sealing. [1]

Contents

Nation state claims

Subject to the constraints of the Antarctic Treaty System, the longest-held nation-state claimant rights in the territory is Australia, being a large part of its claimed Australian Antarctic Territory up to various high latitudes towards the South Pole.

Features

Coastal features include Amundsen Bay, Casey Bay and Cape Monakov. Mountain ranges or sub-ranges being crests above pack ice (escarpments), are the Scott Mountains, the Tula Mountains, and the Napier Mountains. The highest peak is Mount Elkins at 2,300 metres (7,500 ft) Above Ordnance Datum (conventional sea level).

See also

Related Research Articles

Lillie Glacier

Lillie Glacier is a large glacier in Antarctica, about 100 nautical miles (190 km) long and 10 nautical miles (19 km) wide. It lies between the Bowers Mountains on the west and the Concord Mountains and Anare Mountains on the east, flowing to Ob' Bay on the coast and forming the Lillie Glacier Tongue.

Tula Mountains

The Tula Mountains are a group of extensive mountains lying immediately eastward of Amundsen Bay in Enderby Land, Antarctica. They were discovered on January 14, 1930, by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) under Mawson and named "Tula Range" by him after John Biscoe's brig, the Tula, from which Biscoe discovered Enderby Land in 1831. The term "mountains" was recommended for the group following an ANARE sledge survey in 1958 by G.A. Knuckey.

Scott Mountains (Antarctica) Mountain range in Antarctica

The Scott Mountains are a large number of isolated peaks lying south of Amundsen Bay in Enderby Land of East Antarctica, Antarctica. Discovered on 13 January 1930 by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) under Sir Douglas Mawson. He named the feature Scott Range after Captain Robert Falcon Scott, Royal Navy. The term mountains is considered more appropriate because of the isolation of its individual features.

Amundsen Bay, also known as Ice Bay, is a long embayment 39 kilometres (24 mi) wide, close west of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land, Antarctica. The bay was seen as a large pack-filled recession in the coastline by Sir Douglas Mawson on 14 January 1930. Seen by Captain Hjalmar Riiser-Larsen in charge of a Norwegian expedition during an airplane flight on 15 January and subsequently mapped nearer its true position by the Norwegians. The bay was mapped in detail by an Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions party landed by aircraft in 1956 and another landed by launch from Thala Dan in February 1958. It was named by Mawson after Roald Amundsen, the Norwegian explorer who was first to reach the South Pole.

Shinnan Glacier

Shinnan Glacier is a glacier which flows northwest to the coast just east of Shinnan Rocks and marks the division between Queen Maud Land and Enderby Land. Mapped from surveys and air photos by Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE), 1957–62, and named Shinnan Hyōga.

Sydney Lorrimar Kirkby, is an Australian surveyor and Antarctic explorer.

Rippon Glacier

Rippon Glacier is a small glacier located in Kemp Land, East Antarctica. It is close east of Seaton Glacier, flowing southward into Edward VIII Ice Shelf.

Mount King (Antarctica) Mountain in Antarctica

Mount King is a large, smooth-crested mountain in the eastern extremity of the Tula Mountains. Part of the Australian Antarctic Gazetteer and the SCAR Composite Gazetteer of Antarctica, it is located in Enderby Land, East Antarctica, which is claimed by Australia as part of the Australian Antarctic Territory. The head of Beaver Glacier is located very close to the base of Mount King.

Posadowsky Glacier (Antarctica) Glacier in Antarctica

Posadowsky Glacier is a glacier about 9 nautical miles long, flowing north to Posadowsky Bay immediately east of Gaussberg. Posadowsky Bay is an open embayment, located just east of the West Ice Shelf and fronting on the Davis Sea in Kaiser Wilhelm II Land. Kaiser Wilhelm II Land is the part of East Antarctica lying between Cape Penck, at 87°43'E, and Cape Filchner, at 91°54'E, and is claimed by Australia as part of the Australian Antarctic Territory. Other notable geographic features in this area include Drygalski Island, located 45 mi NNE of Cape Filchner in the Davis Sea, and Mirny Station, a Russian scientific research station.

Mount Denham is a mountain 1 nautical mile (2 km) northwest of Mount Keyser, in the eastern part of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land. It was plotted from air photos taken from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions aircraft in 1957, and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for W.M. Denham, a weather observer at Mawson Station in 1961.

The Grimsley Peaks are five linear peaks just south of Stor Hanakken Mountain in the Napier Mountains of Enderby Land, Antarctica. They were mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition of 1936–37. They were remapped from air photos taken by Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions in 1956 and were named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for S.W. Grimsley, a technical officer (ionosphere) at Wilkes Station in 1961.

Mount Dungey is a mountain 1 nautical mile (2 km) west of Pythagoras Peak in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land, Antarctica. It was plotted from air photos taken from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions aircraft in 1956, and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for F.G. Dungey, a member of the crew of the Discovery during the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition of 1929–31.

Fluted Rock is a column-like rock standing on the northeast side of Spooner Bay in Enderby Land, Antarctica. It was plotted from air photos taken from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) aircraft in 1956. The ANARE visited the rock in February, 1961 and so named it because of its fluted appearance when viewed from the sea.

Mount Mueller is an ice-covered mountain standing close east of Mount Storegutt, 22 nautical miles (41 km) west of Edward VIll Bay in Enderby Land, Antarctica.

Mount Hardy is a mountain standing close east of Mount Oldfield in the northwest part of the Tula Mountains, in Enderby Land, Antarctica. It was plotted from air photos taken from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions aircraft in 1956 and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for K. Hardy, a weather observer at Wilkes Station in 1959.

The McLeod Nunataks are an isolated group of nunataks 35 nautical miles (65 km) southeast of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land, Antarctica. They were photographed in 1956 by Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) aircraft, and were first visited in December 1958 by an ANARE dog-sledge party, with the position fixed by G.A. Knuckey. The group was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for I.R. McLeod, a geologist at Mawson Station in 1958, and a member of the ANARE dog-sledge party.

The Medvecky Peaks are a group of peaks rising from the northwest part of Loewe Massif, in the eastern part of the Aramis Range, Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica. They were plotted from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) air photographs, and were named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for A. Medvecky, a geologist with the ANARE Prince Charles Mountains survey in 1969.

Mount Mateer is a mountain 1 nautical mile (2 km) east of Mount Degerfeldt, in the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land, Antarctica. It was plotted from air photos taken from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions aircraft in 1956 and 1957 and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for N.C. Mateer, a member of the crew of the Discovery during the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition of 1929–31.

Mount Lunde is a mountain ridge close south of Mount Gleadell, in the western part of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land, Antarctica. It was sighted by the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions Amundsen Bay party, under P.W. Crohn in October 1956, and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for J. Lunde, a senior diesel mechanic at Wilkes Station in 1960.

Mount Letten is a mountain 1 nautical mile (2 km) south of Mount Storer, in the Tula Mountains of Enderby Land, Antarctica. It was plotted from air photos taken from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions aircraft in 1956 and 1957 and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for W.H. Letten, a member of the crew of the RSS Discovery during the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition of 1929–31.

References

  1. "Enderby Land". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2012-03-01.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Enderby Land".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )

Coordinates: 67°30′S53°0′E / 67.500°S 53.000°E / -67.500; 53.000