Those Who Walk Away

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Those Who Walk Away

ThoseWhoWalkAway.jpg

First edition
Author Patricia Highsmith
Language English
Genre Fiction
Set in Italy
Published Doubleday & Co.
Publication date
1967
Media type Print

Those Who Walk Away (1967) is a psychological thriller novel by Patricia Highsmith. It was the twelfth of her 22 novels.

Psychological thriller is a thriller narrative which emphasizes the unstable or delusional psychological states of its characters. In terms of context and convention, it is a subgenre of the broader ranging thriller narrative structure, with similarities to Gothic and detective fiction in the sense of sometimes having a "dissolving sense of reality". It is often told through the viewpoint of psychologically stressed characters, revealing their distorted mental perceptions and focusing on the complex and often tortured relationships between obsessive and pathological characters. Psychological thrillers often incorporate elements of mystery, drama, action, and paranoia. Not to be confused with psychological horror, which involves more terror than psychosomatic themes.

Patricia Highsmith American novelist and short story writer

Patricia Highsmith was an American novelist and short story writer best known for her psychological thrillers, including her series of five novels featuring the character Tom Ripley. She wrote 22 novels and numerous short stories throughout her career spanning nearly five decades, and her work has led to more than two dozen film adaptations. Her writing derived influence from existentialist literature, and questioned notions of identity and popular morality. She was dubbed "the poet of apprehension" by novelist Graham Greene.

Contents

Synopsis

When Ray Garrett's new wife kills herself on their honeymoon, he persuades the initially suspicious Rome police that he's innocent of any wrongdoing over the death. However, his father-in-law, the brutish Ed Coleman, is convinced Ray led to her death and shoots Ray, leaving him for dead. He survives and, desperate to prove himself, follows Coleman to Venice, the husband and father bound together by love and guilt, with Coleman still seeking justice and Garrett a clear conscience.

A honeymoon is a vacation taken by newlyweds immediately after their wedding, to celebrate their marriage. Today, honeymoons are often celebrated in destinations considered exotic or romantic.

Reviews

It has been called Highsmith's "masterpiece". [1]

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References

  1. Žižek, Slavoj (August 21, 2003). "Not a desire to have him, but to be like him". London Review of Books. Retrieved December 11, 2015.