Three Castles Walk, Monmouthshire

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A section of the Three Castles Walk between Skenfirth and Grosmont The Three Castles Walk - geograph.org.uk - 568727.jpg
A section of the Three Castles Walk between Skenfirth and Grosmont

The Three Castles Walk is a waymarked long distance footpath and recreational walk located in north-east Monmouthshire, Wales.

Contents

Distance

The Three Castles Walk covers 31.2 kilometres (19.4 mi) [1] on a circular route.

Route

The route links Skenfrith Castle ( 51°52′42″N2°47′25″W / 51.8783°N 2.7903°W / 51.8783; -2.7903 (Skenfrith Castle) ), Grosmont Castle ( 51°54′55″N2°51′58″W / 51.9154°N 2.8661°W / 51.9154; -2.8661 (Grosmont Castle) ) and White Castle ( 51°50′46″N2°54′08″W / 51.8460°N 2.9021°W / 51.8460; -2.9021 (White Castle) ). [1] It follows woods and hills and takes the walker over Graig Syfyrddin (Edmunds Tump), from which there are views of the Welsh Marches, the mountains of South Wales, including the Black Mountains, and the Forest of Dean and beyond.

The Three Castles Walk links with both the Offa's Dyke Path (at White Castle) and the Monnow Valley Walk (at Skenfrith and Grosmont).

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References

  1. 1 2 "Three Castles Walk (Monmouthshire)". The Long Distance Walkers Association. Retrieved 25 May 2011.
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Coordinates: 51°52′33″N2°53′11″W / 51.8757°N 2.8863°W / 51.8757; -2.8863