Graig Syfyrddin

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Graig Syfyrddin
Pastures by the Black Brook - geograph.org.uk - 1190152.jpg
Graig Syfyrddin viewed from the west
Highest point
Elevation 423 m (1,388 ft)
Prominence 235 m (771 ft)
Parent peak Ysgyryd Fawr
Listing Marilyn
Geography
Location Monmouthshire, Wales
Parent range Brecon Beacons
OS grid SO403210

Graig Syfyrddin or just The Graig, is a 423m high hill near Grosmont in north-eastern Monmouthshire, Wales. The summit knoll is known as Edmund's Tump. The hill consists of an isolated mass of the micaceous sandstones of the Brownstones Formation, a unit of the Old Red Sandstone well known from the nearby Black Mountains, of which it can be considered an outlier in both the geographical and geological sense. [1]

The Three Castles Walk, [2] a waymarked recreational walk in Monmouthshire linking Grosmont Castle, White Castle (Wales) and Skenfrith Castle passes over the hill.

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References

  1. "Trig point on Edmund's Tump (C) Philip Halling". geograph.org.uk.
  2. "Ysgyryd Fawr and Sugar Loaf (C) Philip Halling". geograph.org.uk.

Coordinates: 51°53′04″N2°52′08″W / 51.88435°N 2.86878°W / 51.88435; -2.86878