Three Romances for Violin and Piano

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Three Romances for Violin and Piano
by Clara Schumann
Franz von Lenbach - Clara Schumann (Pastell 1878).jpg
Schumann, in 1878, in a painting by Franz von Lenbach
Opus 22
Composed1853
Dedication Joseph Joachim
Published
Movements3

The Three Romances for Violin and Piano, Op. 22 of Clara Schumann, were written in 1853 and first published in 1855.

Contents

Background

Having moved to Düsseldorf in 1853, Clara Schumann, who said that "Women are not born to compose," produced several works, including these three romances. [1] Dedicated to the legendary violinist Joseph Joachim, Schumann and Joachim went on tour with them, even playing them before King George V of Hanover, who was "completely ecstatic" upon hearing them. [2] A critic for the Neue Berliner Musikzeitung praised them, declaring: "All three pieces display an individual character conceived in a truly sincere manner and written in a delicate and fragrant hand." [2] Stephen Pettitt for The Times, wrote, "Lush and poignant, they make one regret that Clara's career as a composer became subordinate to her husband's." [3]

Structure

The romances, scored for violin and piano, are written in three movements:

  1. Andante molto
  2. Allegretto
  3. Leidenschaftlich schnell

The first romance begins with hints of gypsy pathos, before a brief central theme with energetic arpeggios ensues. [4] This is followed by a final section similar to the first, in which Clara Schumann charmingly refers to the main theme from her husband Robert Schumann's first violin sonata. [5] The second romance is more wistful, with many embellishments. It is sometimes considered as representative of all three, beginning with a plaintive appetizer to its energetic, extroverted leaps and arpeggios, followed by a more developed section with the first theme present. [6] The last movement, while very similar to the first but approximately the same length in time as the first two, features long-limbed melodies with rippling, bubbling piano accompaniment. [7]

An average performance is about ten minutes in duration.

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Märchenerzählungen, Op. 132, is a trio composition by Robert Schumann in four movements for clarinet, viola and piano. He composed the clarinet-viola-piano trio in B-flat major, between 9 and 11 October 1853. The movements are connected by a motif (Kernmotiv). The work is dedicated to Schumann's pupil Albert Dietrich, and was published in 1854 by Breitkopf & Härtel.

Adagio and Allegro, Op. 70, is a chamber music piece in A-flat major for piano and horn by Robert Schumann. It was written in February 1849. Schumann planned alternative editions before it was printed in which the horn or cello or violin can be replaced. The title was initially intended to be "Romance and Allegro". Schumann then decided on "Adagio and Allegro".

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Piano Concerto (Clara Schumann)</span> Musical composition by Clara Schumann

The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 7, was composed by Clara Wieck, better known as Clara Schumann after her later marriage to Robert Schumann. She completed her only finished piano concerto in 1835, and played it first that year with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, conducted by Felix Mendelssohn.

References

  1. "Schumann, Clara: Three Romances for Violin, Op. 22". Tim Summers, violinist. 19 May 2008. Retrieved 19 February 2016.
  2. 1 2 Rodda, Dr. Richard E. "Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center: Sunday, April 27, 2014" (PDF). Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Retrieved 19 February 2016.
  3. Pettitt, Stephen (27 January 2013). "Record Review". The Times .
  4. "Three Romances for Violin and Piano, Op. 22". LAPhil. Retrieved 19 February 2016.
  5. Phillips, Anthony. "Robert and Clara Schumann: Music for Cello and Piano". Naxos. Retrieved 19 February 2016.
  6. Lowe, Steven. "Seattle Chamber Music Society: Summer Festival, Friday July 12 2013" (PDF). Seattle Chamber Music Society. Retrieved 19 February 2016.
  7. Palmer, John. "Romances (3) for violin & piano, Op. 22". AllMusic. Retrieved 19 February 2016.