Thrum Hall

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Thrum Hall
Location Halifax, West Yorkshire
Coordinates 53°43′29.55″N1°53′17.60″W / 53.7248750°N 1.8882222°W / 53.7248750; -1.8882222 Coordinates: 53°43′29.55″N1°53′17.60″W / 53.7248750°N 1.8882222°W / 53.7248750; -1.8882222
Capacity 9,832 (before closure)
Record attendance29,153 (21 March 1959 v Wigan)
Opened18 September 1886
Closed1998
Tenants
Halifax

Thrum Hall was a rugby league stadium on Hanson Lane in Halifax, West Yorkshire, England. It was the home of Halifax for 112 years. The site on which the ground stood is now occupied by a supermarket.

Contents

History

In 1878, Halifax, who had just won the inaugural Yorkshire Cup, bought a patch of land for £3,000 from a local farmer, Major Dyson, to develop as a new multi-purpose sports ground. It was to be a replacement for their Hanson Lane ground which stood opposite. [1]

The site measured 55,000 square yards and included a cricket pitch and bowling greens. [2] The rugby stadium was opened on 18 September 1886 by Alderman Riley, who kicked off before the Halifax v Hull F.C. match. Forward Ernest Williamson scored the first try (his only try for Halifax) and the home side went on to win in front of a crowd of around 8,000. [1] As Thrum Hall was built on an old hilltop farm, it had a distinctive slope of 4 yards away from the main grandstand touchline. [3]

The ground was continuously developed over the next 40 to 50 years and it came to be regularly used as a neutral ground for Challenge Cup and Championship matches, including the 1914 Challenge Cup final (won by Hull) and the 1912, 1929 and 1930 Championship deciders. [4]

Thrum Hall was run by trustees from 1921. [5]

The attendance record of 29,153 was set in a third round Challenge Cup tie against Wigan on 21 March 1959. By the time of the Taylor Report, Thrum Hall's capacity was reduced to 9,832. [6]

The Asda supermarket that now stands on the site of Thrum Hall stadium Asda, Thrum Hall, seen from Wainhouse Tower - geograph.org.uk - 1385814.jpg
The Asda supermarket that now stands on the site of Thrum Hall stadium

Halifax was hit hard by the financial situation of the late 1960s, and 1970s. In 1970, a concert was held at Thrum Hall in an attempt to alleviate these financial troubles. Adverse weather conditions meant that only around 3,000 arrived to watch the 'Halifax Pop and Blues Concert' which made a loss of £6,000. [7]

Other uses

The adjacent Thrum Hall Cricket Ground hosted four first class cricket matches between 1888 and 1897. [8] Yorkshire played three County Championship matches there, in July 1888 against Gloucestershire, August 1889 against Middlesex and Kent in June 1897, while they played Essex in a non-championship fixture in July 1894. Kent were bowled out for 74 in their match, with Bobby Peel taking 8 for 93. Peel also bowled Gloucestershire out for just 89, taking 7 for 39, in a low scoring match which Yorkshire won by 3 wickets.

The cricket ground had a speedway track constructed around the outside of it in 1928 and it was known as the Thrum Hall Grounds by this time. It hosted speedway until 1930 when the new Halifax Greyhound Stadium was constructed on the site. [9] [10] [11]

Closure

Halifax sold Thrum Hall for £1.5 million to Asda for a superstore development in 1998, and moved across town to their present home, the Shay Stadium. The supermarket chain closed their existing store in Battinson Road, when the new store finally opened after a protracted legal battle in 2004. [12] [13]

Rugby League Test Matches

The list of international rugby league matches played at Thrum Hall is: [14]

Game#DateResultAttendanceNotes
17 April 1930 Other Nationalities def. Flag of England.svg  England 35–192,300
210 April 1937Flag of England.svg  England def. Flag of France.svg  France 23–97,024 1936–37 European Rugby League Championship
315 May 1948 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg British Empire drew with Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 36–36

Rugby League Tour Matches

Thrum Hall also saw the Halifax R.L.F.C. play host to international touring teams from Australia (sometimes playing as Australasia) and New Zealand from 1907–1994.

gameDateResultAttendanceNotes
114 December 1907 Faxcolours.svg Halifax def. New Zealand Kiwis colours.svg New Zealand 9–411,000 1907–08 All Golds tour
25 December 1908 Faxcolours.svg Halifax def. Australian colours.svg Australia 12–86,000 1908–09 Kangaroo Tour
326 December 1911 Australian colours.svg Australasia def. Faxcolours.svg Halifax 23–510,000 1911–12 Kangaroo Tour
431 December 1921 Australian colours.svg Australasia def. Faxcolours.svg Halifax 35–612,000 1921–22 Kangaroo Tour
518 September 1926 Faxcolours.svg Halifax def. New Zealand Kiwis colours.svg New Zealand 19–1313,000 1926–27 New Zealand Kiwis tour
623 November 1929 Australian colours.svg Australasia def. Faxcolours.svg Halifax 58–98,440 1929–30 Kangaroo Tour
730 September 1933 Australian colours.svg Australia def. Faxcolours.svg Halifax 16–510,358 1933–34 Kangaroo Tour
82 October 1937 Faxcolours.svg Halifax def. Australian colours.svg Australia 12–214,500 1937–38 Kangaroo Tour
927 November 1948 Australian colours.svg Australia def. Faxcolours.svg Halifax 10–86,250 1948–49 Kangaroo Tour
1020 September 1952 Australian colours.svg Australia def. Faxcolours.svg Halifax 39–718,773 1952–53 Kangaroo Tour
115 December 1956 Faxcolours.svg Halifax def. Australian colours.svg Australia 6–32,254 1956–57 Kangaroo Tour
127 November 1959 Australian colours.svg Australia def. Faxcolours.svg Halifax 17–58,274 1959–60 Kangaroo Tour
1329 November 1967 Australian colours.svg Australia def. Faxcolours.svg Halifax 22–25,285 1967–68 Kangaroo Tour
1429 October 1986 Australian colours.svg Australia def. Faxcolours.svg Halifax 36–27,193 1986 Kangaroo Tour
156 November 1990 Australian colours.svg Australia def. Faxcolours.svg Halifax 36–188,730 1990 Kangaroo Tour
1616 October 1994 Australian colours.svg Australia def. Faxcolours.svg Halifax 26–128,352 1994 Kangaroo Tour

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References

  1. 1 2 Delaney 1991, p. 77.
  2. "Archive Pictures". cricketarchive.com. Retrieved 25 April 2013.
  3. McGregor, Adrian (1991). Simply The Best: The 1990 Kangaroos. Qld: University of Queensland Press. p. 152 A Hex on Halifax. ISBN   0 7022 2370 0.
  4. Delaney 1991, pp. 79–81.
  5. "Fartown will never fade from memory". The Yorkshire Post. 29 December 2006. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  6. Delaney 1991, p. 80.
  7. "Becoming A Director". rugbyleagueoralhistory.co.uk. Archived from the original on 8 September 2013. Retrieved 25 April 2013.
  8. "Archive Grounds". cricketarchive.com. Retrieved 25 April 2013.
  9. Defunct Speedway - Thrum Hall
  10. "OS County Series 1933". old-maps.co.uk.
  11. "OS Plan 1962". old-maps.co.uk.
  12. "Lifeline for Blue Sox as sale deal goes through". Halifax Courier. 9 April 2002. Retrieved 17 October 2017.
  13. "Bulldozers move in to pull apart sports ground". Halifax Courier. 8 June 2002. Retrieved 17 October 2017.
  14. Thrum Hall at Rugby League Project

Bibliography