Thutmose

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Thutmose
Egyptian hieroglyphs

Thutmose (also rendered Thutmoses, Thutmosis, Tuthmose, Tutmosis, Thothmes, Tuthmosis, Djhutmose, etc.) is an Anglicization of the Ancient Egyptian personal name dhwty-ms, usually translated as "Born of the god Thoth".

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Thoutmôsis (in Ancient Greek Θούθμωσις / Thoúthmôsis ) is the Hellenized form of the Egyptian Ḏḥwtj-mś (reconstructed pronunciation: /tʼaˈħawtij ˈmissaw/) and means "Born of Thoth ". This theophoric name was part of the royal titulary of four pharaohs of the 18th dynasty as the name of Sa-Rê or “birth name”. It was also worn by the eldest son of Amenhotep III , high priest of Ptah , as well as by a vizier who exercised his functions successively under Thutmose IV and Amenhotep III . Under this last king and under his successor, Amenhotep IV , two other high dignitaries, royal sons of Kush , similarly called themselves "Born[s] of Thoth"

Ancient Egyptians

Monarchs and royals

The name was common among royals of the Eighteenth Dynasty, which is thus sometimes called the "Thutmosid" Dynasty from the reign of Thutmose I onward.

Royal officials

Other Egyptians

Others

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