Thyranthrene albicincta

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Thyranthrene albicincta
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Sesiidae
Genus: Thyranthrene
Species:
T. albicincta
Binomial name
Thyranthrene albicincta
(Hampson, 1919) [1]
Synonyms
  • Homogyna albicinctaHampson, 1919

Thyranthrene albicincta is a moth of the family Sesiidae. It is known from Malawi.

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