Tiberius Julius Pollienus Auspex

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Tiberius Julius Pollienus Auspex (fl. 3rd century AD) was a Roman senator who was appointed suffect consul between AD 212 and 222.

Roman Empire period of Imperial Rome following the Roman Republic (27 BC–395 AD)

The Roman Empire was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization. It had a government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, North Africa, and West Asia. From the constitutional reforms of Augustus to the military anarchy of the third century, the Empire was a principate ruled from the city of Rome. The Roman Empire was then divided between a Western Roman Empire, based in Milan and later Ravenna, and an Eastern Roman Empire, based in Nicomedia and later Constantinople, and it was ruled by multiple emperors.

Senate of the Roman Empire

The Senate of the Roman Empire was a political institution in the ancient Roman Empire. After the fall of the Roman Republic, the constitutional balance of power shifted from the "Roman Senate" to the "Roman Emperor." Beginning with the first emperor, Augustus, the Emperor and the Senate were technically two co-equal branches of government. In practice, however the actual authority of the imperial Senate was negligible, as the Emperor held the true power of the state. As such, membership in the Senate became sought after by individuals seeking prestige and social standing, rather than actual authority. During the reigns of the first Emperors, legislative, judicial, and electoral powers were all transferred from the "Roman assemblies" to the Senate. However, since the control that the Emperor held over the senate was absolute, the Senate acted as a vehicle through which the Emperor exercised his autocratic powers.

Roman consul High political office in ancient Rome

A consul held the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic, and ancient Romans considered the consulship the highest level of the cursus honorum.

Contents

Biography

Julius Pollienus Auspex, a member of the possibly Italian gens Polliena, was probably the son of Pollienus Auspex, although some scholars have maintained that both men are the same individual. [1] Some time between AD 212 and 222, Auspex was appointed the Legatus Augusti pro praetore of the province of Numidia. He was also during this period appointed suffect consul in absentia. [2]

Pollienus Auspex was a Roman military officer and senator who was appointed suffect consul around AD 185. His praenomen is thought to be Tiberius.

Legatus Augusti pro praetore

A legatus Augusti pro praetore was the official title of the governor or general of some imperial provinces of the Roman Empire during the Principate era, normally the larger ones or those where legions were based. Provinces were denoted imperial if their governor was selected by the emperor, in contrast to senatorial provinces, whose governors were elected by the Roman Senate.

Roman province Major Roman administrative territorial entity outside of Italy

In Ancient Rome, a province was the basic and, until the tetrarchy, the largest territorial and administrative unit of the empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The word province in Modern English has its origins in the Latin term used by the Romans.

Julius Pollienus Auspex may have been the adoptive father of Tiberius Pollienus Armenius Peregrinus, consul in AD 244.

Tiberius Pollienus Armenius Peregrinus was a Roman senator who was appointed consul in AD 244.

Sources

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References

  1. Mennen, pg. 117
  2. Mennen, pg. 118
Political offices
Preceded by
Uncertain
Consul suffectus in absentia of the Roman Empire
between AD 212 and 222
Succeeded by
Uncertain