Tiger Jones

Last updated
Ralph Jones
Statistics
Weight(s) Middleweight
NationalityAmerican
Born(1928-03-14)March 14, 1928
Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
DiedAugust 20, 1994(1994-08-20) (aged 66)
Queens, New York, U.S.
StanceOrthodox
Boxing record
Total fights89
Wins52
Wins by KO13
Losses32
Draws5
No contests0

Ralph "Tiger" Jones (March 14, 1928 – August 20, 1994) was a boxer during the 1950s. Trained by Gil Clancy, Jones was a fixture of televised boxing in the 1950s, known for an aggressive style that pleased fans. His overall record was 52 victories, 32 losses and five draws.

Contents

He became a professional boxer in 1950. In 1955 he scored an upset over Sugar Ray Robinson. Robinson was highly favored in the fight, which was Robinson's second during a comeback. [1] That was only one of his wins against top-level fighters of that era. He also beat Joey Giardello and Kid Gavilán (both these fighters were world champions at one time and, in other fights, also defeated Jones). Fighters to whom he lost include world champions Gene Fullmer, Johnny Saxton, Paul Pender, and Carl "Bobo" Olson. In all, he fought six world champions on ten occasions. [2]

After he retired, Jones drove a cab and worked for a canning company. He was survived by three sons and two grandchildren.

Professional boxing record

89 fights52 wins32 losses
By knockout131
By decision3931
By disqualification00
Draws5
No.ResultRecordOpponentTypeRoundDateLocation
89Loss52–32–5 László Papp PTS10Feb 21, 1962 Stadthalle, Vienna, Austria
88Loss52–31–5 Joe DeNucci UD10Jan 23, 1962 Boston Garden, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
87Win52–30–5 Duane Horsman UD10May 17, 1961 Mayo Civic Auditorium, Rochester, New York, U.S.
86Loss51–30–5Rocky FumerelleUD10Apr 25, 1961 Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, New York, U.S.
85Draw51–29–5 Joe DeNucci PTS10Feb 24, 1961 Boston Garden, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
84Loss51–29–4 Joey Giambra UD10Dec 6, 1960 Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, New York, U.S.
83Loss51–28–4Marcel PigouMD10Nov 5, 1960 Arena, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
82Win51–27–4 Joe DeNucci UD10Apr 29, 1960 Arena, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
81Win50–27–4Willie GreeneTKO7 (10)Mar 28, 1960 Rhode Island Auditorium, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.
80Loss49–27–4 Wilf Greaves UD10Feb 3, 1960 Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
79Win49–26–4 Victor Zalazar MD10Jun 26, 1959 Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
78Loss48–26–4 Joey Giambra UD10May 18, 1959 Memorial Auditorium, Dallas, Texas, U.S.
77Loss48–25–4 Paul Pender UD10Mar 17, 1959 Boston Garden, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
76Win48–24–4 Joey Giardello SD10Jan 28, 1959 Freedom Hall, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.
75Loss47–24–4Rory CalhounUD10Dec 15, 1958 Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
74Win47–23–4Rory CalhounUD10Nov 21, 1958 Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
73Win46–23–4Mickey CrawfordTKO10 (10)Sep 10, 1958 Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
72Loss45–23–4 Jim Hegerle UD10May 17, 1958 State Fair Coliseum, Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S.
71Loss45–22–4 Kid Gavilan SD10Apr 4, 1958 Arena, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
70Win45–21–4 Kid Gavilan SD10Feb 19, 1958 Carillon Hotel, Miami Beach, Florida, U.S.
69Loss44–21–4 Joey Giardello UD10Dec 27, 1957 Auditorium, Miami Beach, Florida, U.S.
68Loss44–20–4Willie VaughnUD10Nov 29, 1957 Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
67Loss44–19–4 Del Flanagan UD10Aug 24, 1957 Hippodrome Fair, Saint Paul, Minnesota, U.S.
66Loss44–18–4 Gene Fullmer UD10Jun 7, 1957 Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
65Draw44–17–4Joe GrayPTS10Apr 25, 1957 I.M.A. Auditorium, Flint, Michigan, U.S.
64Win44–17–3Chico VejarMD10Apr 12, 1957 War Memorial Auditorium, Syracuse, New York, U.S.
63Win43–17–3 Arthur King UD10Mar 25, 1957 Maple Leaf Gardens, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
62Win42–17–3Hardy SmallwoodUD10Jan 18, 1957 Music Hall, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
61Loss41–17–3Charles HumezPTS10Nov 19, 1956Palais des Sports, Paris, France
60Win41–16–3 Wilf Greaves SD10Sep 13, 1956Capitol Arena, Washington, D.C., U.S.
59Win40–16–3Jesse TurnerUD10Jul 30, 1956Auditorium, Portland, Oregon, U.S.
58Loss39–16–3 Gene Fullmer UD10Apr 20, 1956Public Hall, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
57Win39–15–3Charles HumezSD10Mar 23, 1956Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
56Win38–15–3Tony BaldoniKO6 (10)Feb 8, 1956Capitol Arena, Washington, D.C., U.S.
55Loss37–15–3 Johnny Saxton UD10Nov 9, 1955Auditorium, Oakland, California, U.S.
54Win37–14–3Al AndrewsUD10Oct 12, 1955Dinner Key Auditorium, Coconut Grove, Florida, U.S.
53Win36–14–3 Chris Christensen UD10Sep 23, 1955Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
52Win35–14–3Ernie DurandoTKO6 (10)Jun 16, 1955Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
51Loss34–14–3 Eduardo Lausse UD10May 13, 1955Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
50Win34–13–3Georgie JohnsonTKO5 (10)Apr 8, 1955Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
49Loss33–13–3 Bobo Olson UD10Feb 16, 1955Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
48Win33–12–3 Sugar Ray Robinson UD10Jan 19, 1955Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
47Loss32–12–3 Peter Mueller SD10Dec 4, 1954Sports Arena, Rochester, New York, U.S.
46Loss32–11–3Hector ConstanceMD10Nov 12, 1954Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
45Loss32–10–3 Joey Giardello UD10Sep 24, 1954Arena, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
44Loss32–9–3Pedro GonzalesSD10May 24, 1954St. Nicholas Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
43Loss32–8–3Jacques Royer CrecyUD10May 14, 1954Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
42Win32–7–3Billy McNeeceUD10Apr 5, 1954Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
41Win31–7–3Bobby DykesTKO10 (10)Mar 8, 1954Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
40Loss30–7–3 Kid Gavilan UD10Aug 26, 1953Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
39Win30–6–3Danny WomberUD10Jun 27, 1953War Memorial Auditorium, Syracuse, New York, U.S.
38Win29–6–3Mickey LaurentUD10Jun 8, 1953Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
37Win28–6–3Rocky TomaselloUD10May 19, 1953Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
36Win27–6–3Jimmy HerringUD10May 1, 1953St. Nicholas Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
35Draw26–6–3Danny WomberPTS10Mar 16, 1953Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
34Win26–6–2Danny WomberSD10Feb 17, 1953Arena, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.
33Win25–6–2Marvin EdelmanTKO9 (10)Feb 9, 1953Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
32Loss24–6–2 Rocky Castellani SD10Jan 1, 1953Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
31Win24–5–2 Johnny Bratton UD10Dec 5, 1952Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
30Win23–5–2Mike KoballaUD8Oct 30, 1952Sunnyside Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
29Loss22–5–2 Johnny Saxton SD10Oct 3, 1952St. Nicholas Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
28Win22–4–2Sal DiMartinoUD8Sep 22, 1952Fort Hamilton Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
27Loss21–4–2Jimmy HerringUD8Aug 18, 1952Fort Hamilton Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
26Win21–3–2Mike KoballaUD8Apr 26, 1952Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
25Win20–3–2Tommy BazzanoSD8Apr 1, 1952Westchester County Center, White Plains, New York, U.S.
24Loss19–3–2 Rocky Castellani PTS8Mar 8, 1952Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
23Win19–2–2Tommy BazzanoSD8Feb 9, 1952Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
22Win18–2–2Bobby LloydSD8Jan 26, 1952Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
21Draw17–2–2Bobby LloydPTS8Jan 10, 1952Sunnyside Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
20Win17–2–1Phil RizzoTKO7 (8)Dec 8, 1951Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
19Draw16–2–1Sal DiMartinoPTS8Nov 8, 1951Sunnyside Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
18Win16–2Bob StecherUD10Oct 4, 1951Exposition Building, Portland, Maine, U.S.
17Win15–2Roy CarterKO1 (8)May 16, 1951St. Nicholas Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
16Win14–2Waddell HannaPTS6Apr 24, 1951Westchester County Center, White Plains, New York, U.S.
15Win13–2Ronnie HoppPTS6Apr 7, 1951Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
14Win12–2Al NiangPTS6Mar 20, 1951Westchester County Center, White Plains, New York, U.S.
13Win11–2Armand MichaudKO2 (6)Mar 10, 1951Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
12Loss10–2Herbie HayesPTS6Feb 27, 1951Westchester County Center, White Plains, New York, U.S.
11Win10–1Tommy McGowanPTS6Feb 20, 1951Westchester County Center, White Plains, New York, U.S.
10Loss9–1Henry BurroughsTKO1 (6)Jan 13, 1951Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
9Win9–0Tommy McGowanPTS6Dec 9, 1950Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
8Win8–0Henry BurroughsPTS4Nov 18, 1950Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
7Win7–0Herbert ElyPTS4Nov 4, 1950Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.
6Win6–0James BurgosKO2 (4)Oct 31, 1950Jamaica Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
5Win5–0Kelly DuncanPTS4Oct 23, 1950Jamaica Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
4Win4–0George HolzmanTKO5 (6)Oct 11, 1950St. Nicholas Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
3Win3–0Jimmy DillonPTS4Oct 3, 1950Westchester County Center, White Plains, New York, U.S.
2Win2–0Gus PompinoKO4 (4)Jun 7, 1950Meadowbrook Bowl, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.
1Win1–0Jimmy GarciaPTS4May 27, 1950Ridgewood Grove, New York City, New York, U.S.

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References

  1. Swisher, Karl (March 1994), "Rediscovering 'Mr. Television'", The Ring, 73 (3): 56
  2. He never had a title fight, however. Swisher, Karl (March 1994), The Ring: 58{{citation}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)