Timeline of Somerville, Massachusetts

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The following is a timeline of the history of Somerville, Massachusetts, US.

Contents

Prior to 19th century

19th century

1800s–1860s

1870s–1890s

20th century

21st century

See also

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This article is a timeline of the history of the city of Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

This is a timeline of the history of the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States.

This is a timeline of the history of the city of Gloucester, Massachusetts, USA.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Hartford, Connecticut, USA.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Manchester, New Hampshire, United States.

The following is a timeline of the history of Lynn, Massachusetts, USA.

The following is a timeline of the history of New Bedford, Massachusetts, United States.

The following is a timeline of the history of Lowell, Massachusetts, US.

The following is a timeline of the history of Lexington, Kentucky, United States.

Timeline of Newport, Rhode Island.

The following is a timeline of the history of Nantucket, Massachusetts, USA.

References

  1. Francis J. Bremer, John Winthrop: America's Forgotten Founding Father (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003), p. 248.
  2. Robert C. Winthrop, Life And Letters Of John Winthrop: Governor Of The Massachusetts Bay Company At Their Emigration To New England 1630, (Kessinger Publishing, LLC), p. 64.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Britannica 1910.
  4. The History of Prospect Hill, part 2 Retrieved 2014-10-11
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 Haley 1903.
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Fiftieth Anniversary 1922.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Greenough 1875.
  8. Ueda 1984.
  9. Harvard University. First Universalist Church (Somerville, Mass.). Records, 1861-1984: A Finding Aid
  10. Catalogue of Books in the Somerville Circulating Library, Boston: Alfred Mudge & Son, 1864, OCLC   704271104, OL   24617840M
  11. Greenough 1883.
  12. Finding list of the Public Library of the City of Somerville, Mass., Somerville, Mass.: Somerville Journal Print, 1895, OL   22094495M
  13. "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved August 28, 2012.
  14. Harvard University. West Somerville Universalist Church (Somerville, Mass.). Records, 1884-1950: A Finding Aid
  15. Galpin 1901.
  16. Somerville Historical Society (1898), Ye olden times at the foot of Prospect Hill: handbook of the historic festival in Somerville Massachusetts, November 28, 29, 30, December 1, 2, and 3 MDCCCXCVIII; Margaret MacLaren Eager, director, Somerville Journal, OCLC   11271884, OL   6940324M
  17. Harvard University. Forthian Club of Somerville (Mass.) Records, 1889-1979: A Finding Aid
  18. Boston Evening Transcript - Nov 11, 1899
  19. Frederick A. Wilmot (1915), Somerville Pageant of World Peace: to foster and prophesy world peace; Tufts Oval, Somerville, Mass., July 3 and 5, 1915, West Somerville, Mass, OL   7194701M {{citation}}: CS1 maint: location missing publisher (link)
  20. 1 2 3 Pluralism Project. "Somerville, Massachusetts". Directory of Religious Centers. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University. Retrieved October 15, 2013.
  21. "Timeline". Massachusetts: Somerville Community Access Television. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  22. "Community Media Archive". Internet Archive.{{cite web}}: Missing or empty |url= (help)
  23. "Brickbottom Artists Association" . Retrieved August 28, 2012.
  24. "reThink INK: 25 Years at Mixit Print Studio", Exhibitions, Boston Public Library, 2012
  25. "Somerville Museum" . Retrieved August 28, 2012.
  26. "City of Somerville". Archived from the original on 1998-11-11 via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine.
  27. "History". Somerville Open Studios. Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  28. Mike Tigas and Sisi Wei, ed. (9 May 2013). "Somerville, Massachusetts". Nonprofit Explorer. New York: ProPublica . Retrieved December 13, 2013.
  29. "Meet the Mayors". Washington, DC: United States Conference of Mayors. Archived from the original on June 27, 2008. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  30. "Photos: Honk! Marching Band Festival In Somerville". The Artery. WBUR. October 13, 2013.
  31. "Munch Madness 2015", Boston Globe, retrieved 26 March 2015
  32. "Somerville Nordeste Finalize Sister City Agreement". City of Somerville. 2010.

Bibliography

Further reading

Images

42°23′15″N71°06′00″W / 42.3875°N 71.1°W / 42.3875; -71.1