Tina Malti

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Malti, 2022

Tina Malti is a Canadian-German child psychologist of Palestinian descent. She currently holds an Alexander von Humboldt Professorship for Early Child Development and Health as the first child psychologist and female psychologist in the award's history. She directs the Alexander von Humboldt Research Group for Child Development as research chair at Leipzig University. She is also a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto and founding director of the Centre for Child Development, Mental Health, and Policy at the University of Toronto.

Contents

Tina is the current president of the International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development (ISSBD).

She is known for her research on social-emotional development and mental health in children experiencing varying levels of adversity. Based on this work and a humanistic approach to child development, Dr. Malti creates and tests interventions that help children reach their full potential, overcome the negative effects of trauma, adversity, and violence, and cultivates kindness and ethical strengths.

Over the past two decades, Dr. Malti has directed multidisciplinary research, training, and policy efforts on positive child development and mental health in children from all walks of life. She works closely with local and international communities and agencies to provide and act on evidence to improve the development of all children and reduce exposure to trauma and violence across diverse contexts.

Education

Tina Malti earned a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Free University of Berlin, under the supervision of Wolfgang Edelstein . She also obtained a postgraduate M.A. in clinical child psychology from the Academy of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Children and Adolescents in Switzerland and a Habilitation in psychology from Free University of Berlin.

Research

Research expertise

Tina’s research focuses on social-emotional development and mental health in children experiencing varying levels of adversity. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] Based on this work and a humanistic approach to child development, she creates and tests interventions that help children cultivate kindness and overcome the negative effects of exposure to violence, war, and trauma. [8] To achieve these goals, Tina conducts and directs multidisciplinary research, training, and policy efforts that capitalize on inclusive principles and technological innovations to reach every child. [9]

Tina is a co-editor of the Handbook of Child and Adolescent Aggression [10] and the Cambridge Handbook of Prosociality. [11] Her research has been profiled in The New York Times, The Atlantic, as well as other media outlets.

She and her team work closely with local and international communities and agencies to provide research-informed knowledge that can help nurture the development, wellbeing, and potential for kindness in children from all walks of life. Her work has been funded by all three federal funding agencies in Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, as well as international foundations and funding agencies. [12] Her multi-cultural team has published over 200 publications in the areas of child development, mental health, and intervention research.

Leadership

In 2019, Tina created and established the Centre for Child Development, Mental Health, and Policy at the University of Toronto Mississauga, and she became its founding director. The vision of this multi-disciplinary research centre is to foster every child’s healthy development and potential for kindness, both locally and globally. She has been named recipient of Germany’s most valuable research award, the Alexander von Humboldt Professorship. [13]

Honors

Publications

Colasante, T., Jambon, M., Gao, X., & Malti, T. (2020). A process model linking physiological arousal and fear recognition to aggression via guilt in middle childhood. Development and Psychopathology. Early online publication, February 27, 2020.

Dys, S.P., Peplak, J., Colasante, T., & Malti, T. (2019). Children’s sympathy and sensitivity to excluding economically disadvantaged peers. Developmental Psychology, 55(3), 482–487.

Malti, T. (2020). Children and violence: Nurturing social-emotional development to promote mental health. Social Policy Report (SPR), Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD), 33(2), 1-27.

Malti, T. (2020). Kindness: A perspective from developmental psychology. European Journal of Developmental Psychology. Early online publication, October 12, 2020.

Malti, T. (2016). Toward an integrated clinical-developmental model of guilt. Developmental Review, 39, 16–36.

Malti, T., & Averdijk, M. (2017). Severe youth violence: Developmental perspectives. Introduction to the special section. Child Development, 88, 5–15.

Malti, T., Chaparro, M. P., Zuffianò, A., & Colasante, T. (2016). School-based interventions to promote empathy-related responding in children and adolescents: A developmental analysis. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 45(6), 718–731.

Malti, T., & Cheah, C.S.L. (Eds.) (forthcoming, 2021). Specificity and commonality: Sociocultural generalizability in social-emotional development. Special section. Child Development.

Malti, T., & Rubin, K. H. (Eds.) (2018). Handbook of child and adolescent aggression. New York: Guilford Press.

Zuffianò, A., Colasante, T., Buchmann, M., & Malti, T. (2018). The co-development of sympathy and overt aggression from childhood to early adolescence. Developmental Psychology, 54(1), 98-110.

Related Research Articles

Conduct disorder (CD) is a mental disorder diagnosed in childhood or adolescence that presents itself through a repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior that includes theft, lies, physical violence that may lead to destruction, and reckless breaking of rules, in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate norms are violated. These behaviors are often referred to as "antisocial behaviors", and is often seen as the precursor to antisocial personality disorder; however, the latter, by definition, cannot be diagnosed until the individual is 18 years old. Conduct disorder may result from parental rejection and neglect and can be treated with family therapy, as well as behavioral modifications and pharmacotherapy. Conduct disorder is estimated to affect 51.1 million people globally as of 2013.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kindness</span> Behavior marked by generosity, consideration, assistance, or concern for others

Kindness is a type of behavior marked by acts of generosity, consideration, rendering assistance, or concern for others, without expecting praise or reward in return. It is a subject of interest in philosophy, religion, and psychology.

Ole Ivar Løvaas was a Norwegian-American clinical psychologist and professor at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is most well known for his research on what is now called applied behavior analysis (ABA) to teach autistic children through prompts, modeling, and positive reinforcement. The therapy is also noted for its use of aversives (punishment) to reduce undesired behavior, however these are now used less commonly than in the past.

Child psychopathology refers to the scientific study of mental disorders in children and adolescents. Oppositional defiant disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism spectrum disorder are examples of psychopathology that are typically first diagnosed during childhood. Mental health providers who work with children and adolescents are informed by research in developmental psychology, clinical child psychology, and family systems. Lists of child and adult mental disorders can be found in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Edition (ICD-10), published by the World Health Organization (WHO) and in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). In addition, the Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders of Infancy and Early Childhood is used in assessing mental health and developmental disorders in children up to age five.

Relational aggression, alternative aggression, or relational bullying is a type of aggression in which harm is caused by damaging someone's relationships or social status.

Sibling abuse includes the physical, psychological, or sexual abuse of one sibling by another. More often than not, the younger sibling is abused by the older sibling. Sibling abuse is the most common of family violence in the US, but the least reported. As opposed to sibling rivalry, sibling abuse is characterized by the one-sided treatment of one sibling to another.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Residential treatment center</span> Live-in healthcare facility

A residential treatment center (RTC), sometimes called a rehab, is a live-in health care facility providing therapy for substance use disorders, mental illness, or other behavioral problems. Residential treatment may be considered the "last-ditch" approach to treating abnormal psychology or psychopathology.

The professional practice of behavior analysis is a domain of behavior analysis, the others being radical behaviorism, experimental analysis of behavior and applied behavior analysis. The practice of behavior analysis is the delivery of interventions to consumers that are guided by the principles of radical behaviorism and the research of both experimental and applied behavior analysis. Professional practice seeks to change specific behavior through the implementation of these principles. In many states, practicing behavior analysts hold a license, certificate, or registration. In other states, there are no laws governing their practice and, as such, the practice may be prohibited as falling under the practice definition of other mental health professionals. This is rapidly changing as behavior analysts are becoming more and more common.

In the context of caregiving, neglect is a form of abuse where the perpetrator, who is responsible for caring for someone who is unable to care for themselves, fails to do so. It can be a result of carelessness, indifference, or unwillingness and abuse.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Wediko Children's Services</span> American organization for children

Wediko Children's Services is a non-profit organization that provides therapeutic and educational services to children with serious emotional and behavioral problems and their families. It was founded in 1934.

Social competence consists of social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral skills needed for successful social adaptation. Social competence also reflects having the ability to take another's perspective concerning a situation, learn from past experiences, and apply that learning to the changes in social interactions.

The Coping Cat program is a CBT manual-based and comprehensive treatment program for children from 7 to 13 years old with separation anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and/or related anxiety disorders. It was designed by Philip C. Kendall, PhD, ABPP, and colleagues at the Child and Adolescent Anxiety Disorders Clinic at Temple University. A related program called C.A.T. Project is aimed at adolescents aged 14 to 17. See the publishers webpage [www.WorkbookPublishing.com]

Robert L. Selman is an American-born educational psychologist and perspective-taking theorist who specializes in adolescent social development. He is currently a professor of Education and Human Development at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a professor of psychology in Medicine at Harvard University. He is also known as the author of the 1980s G.I. Joe public service announcements.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sandra L. Calvert</span> American psychologist

Sandra L. Calvert is a developmental and child psychologist, whose scholarship illuminates the children's media area, including policy implications. Calvert is currently professor of psychology, and an affiliated faculty member at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. Calvert is also the co-founder and Director of the Children's Digital Media Center, a multi-university research initiative funded primarily by multiple grants from the National Science Foundation, as well as by private foundations. Calvert served as chair of the department of psychology at Georgetown University from 2006 to 2009.

Marjorie Knickerbocker Pyles Honzik was a developmental psychologist known for her longitudinal research on children's mental abilities, behavioral problems, and health outcomes.

Toni Falbo is a social psychologist known for her research on power dynamics in relationships, sibling status, and development of only children. She is a professor of Educational Psychology and Faculty Research Affiliate of the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

Leonard Abbeduto is a psychologist known for his research on individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders, including Fragile X syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, and Down syndrome, and factors that influence their linguistic development over the lifespan. He is the Tsakopoulos-Vismara Endowed Chair of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at University of California, Davis. He serves as Director of Research at the Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopment Disorders (MIND) Institute, which was launched in 2001. Prior to his affiliation with the University of California, Davis, Abbeduto was the associate director for Behavioral Sciences at the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Mark T. Greenberg</span>

Mark T. Greenberg is the emeritus holder of The Bennett Endowed Chair in Prevention Research in the Penn State College of Health and Human Development, and founding director of the Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center at the Pennsylvania State University. He is the chair of CREATE for Education, a non-profit organization that promotes caring and compassion in education.

Nathan A. Fox is a developmental psychologist known for his contributions to understanding how environmental factors affect early development. He holds the position of Distinguished University Professor of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology at the University of Maryland.

Joy D. Osofsky is a clinical and developmental psychologist, known for her research on infant mental health, how parents nurture their infants and children, and the repercussions that follow exposure to traumatic events and violence. Some of her notable work has examined the aftereffects of Hurricane Katrina, experiences of children raised in broken households, and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on communities. Osofsky is employed as a Professor of Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Public Health at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, and she is Head of the Division of Pediatric Mental Health at the Louisiana State University School of Medicine. Osofsky holds the Barbara Lemann Professorship of Child Welfare at LSU Health New Orleans.

References

  1. Malti, T. (2016). "Toward an integrated clinical-developmental model of guilt". Developmental Review. 39: 16–36. doi:10.1016/j.dr.2015.11.001.
  2. Malti, T., & Dys, S.P. (2018). "From being nice to being kind: Development of prosocial behaviors". Current Opinion in Psychology. 20: 45–49. doi:10.1016/j.copsyc.2017.07.036. PMID   28830006.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  3. Malti, T., & Averdijk, M. (Eds.) (2017). "Severe youth violence: Developmental perspectives. Special section". Child Development. 88 (1): 5–82. doi:10.1111/cdev.12694. PMID   28042900. S2CID   38480301.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  4. Malti, T., Zuffianò, A., Cui, L., Ongley, S.F., Peplak, J., Chaparro, M. P., & Buchmann, M. (2016). "Children's sympathy, guilt, and moral reasoning in helping, cooperation, and sharing: A six-year longitudinal study" (PDF). Child Development. 87 (6): 1783–1795. doi:10.1111/cdev.12632. hdl:11573/1465935. PMID   28262929.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. Zuffianò, A., Colasante, T., Buchmann, M., & Malti, T. (2017). "The co-development of sympathy and overt aggression from childhood to early adolescence" (PDF). Developmental Psychology. 54 (1): 98–110. doi:10.1037/dev0000417. hdl:11573/1464810. PMID   28933891. S2CID   34960332.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  6. Dys, S. P., Peplak, J., Colasante, T., & Malti, T. (2019). "Children's sympathy and sensitivity to excluding economically disadvantaged peers". Developmental Psychology. 55 (3): 482–487. doi:10.1037/dev0000549. PMID   30802100. S2CID   73458513.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  7. Elsayed, D., Song, J. -H., Myatt, E., Colasante, T., & Malti, T. (in press). (2019). "Anger and sadness regulation in refugee children: The roles of pre- and post-migratory factors". Child Psychiatry and Human Development. 50 (5): 846–855. doi:10.1007/s10578-019-00887-4. PMID   30937680. S2CID   91189868.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  8. Malti, T., Chaparro, M. P., Zuffianò, A., & Colasante, T. (2016). "School-based interventions to promote empathy-related responding in children and adolescents: A developmental analysis". Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 45 (6): 718–731. doi:10.1080/15374416.2015.1121822. PMID   26890811. S2CID   24585801.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  9. Colasante, T., Zuffianò, A., Haley, D. W., & Malti, T. (2018). "Children's autonomic nervous system activity while transgressing: Relations to guilt feelings and aggression" (PDF). Developmental Psychology. 54 (9): 1621–1633. doi:10.1037/dev0000500. PMID   30148391. S2CID   52091351.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  10. Malti, T., Rubin, K.H. (Eds.) (2018). Handbook of child and adolescent psychology. New York, NY: Guilford Press. ISBN   9781462526208.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  11. Malti, T., Davidov, M. (Eds.) (in press). Cambridge handbook of prosociality: Development, mechanisms, promotion. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  12. "Funding - Research - Laboratory for Social-Emotional Development and Intervention". www.tinamalti.com. Retrieved 2022-06-08.
  13. "New Alexander von Humboldt Professors selected".