Tolfiq Nassar Ahmed Al Bihani

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Tolfiq Nassar Ahmed Al Bihani
Tolfiq Nassar Ahmed al Bihani.jpg
Born (1972-06-01) June 1, 1972 (age 51) [1]
Tabuk, Saudi Arabia
Detained at  CIA black sites, Guantanamo
Other name(s) Tawfiq Nassar Ahmed al Bihani
ISN 893
Charge(s) extrajudicial detention
StatusStill held in Guantanamo

Tolfiq Nassar Ahmed Al Bihani (born June 1, 1972) is a citizen of Saudi Arabia held in the United States's Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba. [2] His Guantanamo Internment Serial Number is 893.

Contents

The United States Senate Intelligence Committee's report on the CIA's use of torture confirmed that al Bihani had been held in the Central Intelligence Agency's network of black sites, where he had been subjected to torture.

Al Bihani arrived at Guantanamo on February 7, 2003, and has been held there, without charge, for 20 years, 11 months and 6 days. [3]

Publication of captives' CSR Tribunal documents

In September 2007 the Department of Justice published dossiers of unclassified documents arising from the Combatant Status Review Tribunals of 179 captives. [4] Al Bihani had a writ of habeas corpus filed on his behalf, but the Department of Defense did not publish it with the others.

Military Commissions Act

The Military Commissions Act of 2006 mandated that Guantanamo captives were no longer entitled to access the US civil justice system, so all outstanding habeas corpus petitions were stayed. [5]

Boumediene v. Bush

On June 12, 2008, the United States Supreme Court ruled, in Boumediene v. Bush, that the Military Commissions Act could not remove the right for Guantanamo captives to access the US Federal Court system. And all previous Guantanamo captives' habeas petitions were eligible to be re-instated. The judges considering the captives' habeas petitions would be considering whether the evidence used to compile the allegations the men and boys were enemy combatants justified a classification of "enemy combatant". [6]

Protective order

On July 15, 2008, Kristine A. Huskey filed a "NOTICE OF PETITIONERS’ REQUEST FOR 30-DAYS NOTICE OF TRANSFER" on behalf of Al Bihani and several dozen captives. [7] The petition would prevent the Department of Defense from transferring him out of US jurisdiction without giving his attorney's thirty days notice. The Department of Defense had transferred some captives to countries where they were subsequently subjected to abusive treatment—even though they had active habeas corpus petitions.

Habeas timeline

George M. Clarke III swore a declaration on September 9, 2008, stating that Al Bihani's brother Adnan Al Bihani, serving as "next friend" initiated the habeas corpus process, in a letter dated June 17, 2005. [8] Clarke and other attorneys formally filed the petition on December 14, 2005. Al Bihani had initially declined to sign a form authoring Clarke to serve as his counsel in 2005. However, when Clarke was able to meet with him on March 28, 2007, Al Bihani verbally authorized him to serve as his counsel, and he followed up that verbal authorization with a letter authorizing him to serve as counsel.

Named by the US Senate as one of the CIA's captives subjected to torture, without authorization

On December 9, 2014, the United States Senate Intelligence Committee published the 600-page unclassified summary of a 6,000-page report on the CIA's use of torture. [9] While some of the CIA's captives were identified as only been subjected to torture that had been authorized from Washington, other captives, like Al Bihani, were identified as having been tortured by CIA officials who did not have authorization. According to the Intelligence Committee, Al Bihani was "subjected to 72 hours of sleep deprivation between his arrival at detention site Cobalt and his October 2002, interrogation."[ citation needed ]

Reports his brother was killed fighting in Somalia

The Long War Journal reported that a martyrdom statement for Abu 'Asim al Tabuki Mansour Nasser al Bihani was published in November 2011. [10] It reported that this individual had fought in Chechnya, lived in Afghanistan, until the fall of the Taliban, had been captured in Saudi Arabia, transferred to Yemen, where he escaped from Prison, and finally travelled to Somalia, where he died fighting for jihadists. It reported he had two brothers in Guantanamo.

Status during the Donald Trump administration

Observers noted that President Barack Obama's administration made a push to transfer as many individuals from Guantanamo, as possible, during his last year. [11] The Washington Post reported that Al Bihani was one of the five individuals who had been cleared for release, who remained in Guantanamo when Donald Trump was inaugurated. During the election campaign Trump had promised that, once he took power, no one would ever leave detention at Guantanamo, that he would bring more individuals to be detained there.

See also

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References

  1. https://int.nyt.com/data/documenttools/82754-isn-893-tolfiq-nassar-ahmed-al-bihani-jtf-gtmo/2de902219e36b5ed/full.pdf [ bare URL PDF ]
  2. "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006" (PDF). United States Department of Defense . Retrieved 2006-05-15.
  3. Margot Williams (2008-11-03). "Guantanamo Docket: Tolfiq Nassar Ahmed al Bihani". New York Times . Retrieved November 9, 2011.
  4. OARDEC0 (August 8, 2007). "Index for CSRT Records Publicly Files in Guantanamo Detainee Cases" (PDF). United States Department of Defense . Retrieved 2007-09-29.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  5. Peter D. Keisler, Douglas N. Letter (2006-10-16). "NOTICE OF MILITARY COMMISSIONS ACT OF 2006" (PDF). United States Department of Justice. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2008-10-02. Retrieved 2008-09-30.
  6. Farah Stockman (2008-10-24). "Lawyers debate 'enemy combatant'". Boston Globe. Archived from the original on 2008-10-27. Retrieved 2008-10-24.
  7. Kristine A. Huskey (2008-07-15). "Guantanamo Bay Detainee Litigation: Doc 63 -- NOTICE OF PETITIONERS' REQUEST FOR 30-DAYS NOTICE OF TRANSFER" (PDF). United States Department of Justice. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2012-03-09. Retrieved 2008-11-13.
  8. George M. Clarke III (2008-09-09). "Guantanamo Bay Detainee Litigation: Doc 402 -- Declaration of George M. Clarke III" (PDF). United States Department of Justice. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2012-03-09. Retrieved 2008-11-13.
  9. Emma Roller, Rebecca Nelson (2014-12-10). "What CIA Interrogators Did To 17 Detainees Without Approval". National Journal . Archived from the original on 2014-12-11. Retrieved 2014-12-10. Was "subjected to 72 hours of sleep deprivation between his arrival at detention site Cobalt and his October 2002, interrogation."
  10. Bill Roggio (2011-12-10). "Jihadist releases bio of Yemeni al Qaeda operative killed in Somalia". Long War Journal . Retrieved 2011-12-14. The statement announcing the death of Abu 'Asim al Tabuki Mansour Nasser al Bihani was written by Abu Ibrahim al Muhajir and released on Shumukh al Islam, a jihadist forum closely linked to al Qaeda, on Nov. 26.
  11. Julie Tate, Missy Ryan (2017-01-22). "The Trump era has stranded these five men at Guantanamo Bay". Washington Post . Archived from the original on 2017-01-22.