Tony Harman

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Anthony “Tony” Shannon Harman (6 March 1912 – 8 May 1999) was an English farmer and writer who was best known for a 1986 book about his life and the history of his farm entitled Seventy Summers. It was a number one bestseller in the United Kingdom and was made into a 1986 BBC Two television series which he presented.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Farmer person that undertakes agriculture

A farmer is a person engaged in agriculture, raising living organisms for food or raw materials. The term usually applies to people who do some combination of raising field crops, orchards, vineyards, poultry, or other livestock. A farmer might own the farmed land or might work as a laborer on land owned by others, but in advanced economies, a farmer is usually a farm owner, while employees of the farm are known as farm workers, or farmhands. However, in the not so distant past, a farmer was a person who promotes or improves the growth of by labor and attention, land or crops or raises animals.

BBC Two second television channel operated by the BBC

BBC Two is the second flagship television channel of the British Broadcasting Corporation in the United Kingdom, Isle of Man and Channel Islands. It covers a wide range of subject matter, but tends to broadcast more "highbrow" programmes than the more mainstream and popular BBC One. Like the BBC's other domestic TV and radio channels, it is funded by the television licence, and is therefore free of commercial advertising. It is a comparatively well-funded public-service network, regularly attaining a much higher audience share than most public-service networks worldwide.

Harman was born near Chesham in Buckinghamshire and he attended Harrow School and Trinity College, Cambridge where he studied agriculture. In 1931, he started farming Grove Farm near Whelpley Hill. He became a published author late in life with an article in The Guardian . In Seventy Summers he advocated modern farming methods and contrasted them with the methods in place when he took over the farm which had barely changed in 150 years.

Chesham town in Buckinghamshire, England

Chesham is in the Chiltern Hills, Buckinghamshire, England, 11 miles (18 km) southeast of the county town of Aylesbury. Chesham is a civil parish designated a town council within Chiltern district. It is in the Chess Valley and surrounded by farmland. The earliest records of Chesham as a settlement are from the second half of the 10th century although there is archaeological evidence of people in this area from around 8000 BC. Henry III granted the town a royal charter for a weekly market in 1257.

Buckinghamshire County of England

Buckinghamshire, abbreviated Bucks, is a county in South East England which borders Greater London to the south east, Berkshire to the south, Oxfordshire to the west, Northamptonshire to the north, Bedfordshire to the north east and Hertfordshire to the east.

Harrow School English independent school for boys

Harrow School is an independent boarding school for boys in Harrow, London, England. The School was founded in 1572 by John Lyon under a Royal Charter of Elizabeth I, and is one of the original seven public schools that were regulated by the Public Schools Act 1868. Harrow charges up to £12,850 per term, with three terms per academic year (2017/18). Harrow is the fourth most expensive boarding school in the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference.

He followed up with The Charolais adventure 1959–1989 (1990) about the introduction of the French Charolais cattle breed and A Thousand Years on a Chiltern Farm: The Story of Grove Farm, Chesham, Buckinghamshire (1999). He also wrote a Guardian column, served as a magistrate, and was a Labour Party parliamentary candidate for Aylesbury at the 1950, 1951, 1955 general elections. He died aged 87 in 1999. [1]

Charolais cattle breed of taurine beef cattle

The Charolais is a breed of taurine beef cattle from the Charolais area surrounding Charolles, in Burgundy, in eastern France. Charolais are raised for meat; they may be crossed with other breeds, including Angus and Hereford cattle.

Magistrate officer of the state, usually judge

The term magistrate is used in a variety of systems of governments and laws to refer to a civilian officer who administers the law. In ancient Rome, a magistratus was one of the highest ranking government officers, and possessed both judicial and executive powers. In other parts of the world, such as China, a magistrate was responsible for administration over a particular geographic area. Today, in some jurisdictions, a magistrate is a judicial officer who hears cases in a lower court, and typically deals with more minor or preliminary matters. In other jurisdictions, magistrates may be volunteers without formal legal training who perform a judicial role with regard to minor matters.

The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom which has been described as an alliance of social democrats, democratic socialists and trade unionists. The party's platform emphasises greater state intervention, social justice and strengthening workers' rights.

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Asheridge human settlement in United Kingdom

Asheridge is a small hamlet in the parish of Chartridge, in Buckinghamshire, England. Prior to 1898 it was part of Chesham parish. It is situated in the Chiltern Hills, about two and a half miles north west of Chesham, 5 miles from Great Missenden and 6 miles from Wendover.

Bellingdon village in United Kingdom

Bellingdon the name deriving from the Anglo Saxon Bellingdenu or Bella's Valley, and is recorded as Belenden in the 15th century, is a village in the civil parish of Chartridge, in Buckinghamshire, England. It is arranged along a ridge, typical of the Chiltern Hills to the north of Chesham.

Hawridge village in United Kingdom

Hawridge, is a small village in the Chilterns in the county of Buckinghamshire, England and bordering the county boundary with Hertfordshire. It is 3 miles (4.8 km) from Chesham, 4 miles (6.4 km) from both Tring and Berkhamsted. Hawridge is one of four villages comprising Cholesbury-cum-St Leonards, a civil parish within Chiltern District.

Holmer Green village in United Kingdom

Historically, Holmer Green was a hamlet in the civil parish of Little Missenden, in Buckinghamshire, England. It is next to Hazlemere, about 3 miles (5 km) south of Great Missenden.

Sir Richard Bernard Frank Stewart Body was an English politician. He was Conservative Member of Parliament for Billericay from 1955 to 1959, for Holland with Boston from 1966 to 1997, and for Boston and Skegness from 1997 until he stood down at the 2001 general election. He was a long-standing member of the Conservative Monday Club, and came second in its 1972 election for chairman. Body also served as President of the Anti-Common Market League.

Slapton, Buckinghamshire village and civil parish in Aylesbury Vale, Buckinghamshire, England

Slapton is a village and also a civil parish within Aylesbury Vale district in Buckinghamshire, England. It is located between the Grand Union Canal and the border with Bedfordshire, about three miles south of Leighton Buzzard, three miles west of Edlesborough.

Chiltern District Non-metropolitan district in England

Chiltern is one of four local government districts of Buckinghamshire in south central England. It is named after the Chiltern Hills on which the region sits.

Biodynamic agriculture method of organic farming

Biodynamic agriculture is a form of alternative agriculture very similar to organic farming, but it includes various esoteric concepts drawn from the ideas of Rudolf Steiner (1861–1925). Initially developed in 1924, it was the first of the organic agriculture movements. It treats soil fertility, plant growth, and livestock care as ecologically interrelated tasks, emphasizing spiritual and mystical perspectives.

Baron Chesham

Baron Chesham, of Chesham in the County of Buckingham, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom created in 1858 for the Hon. Charles Cavendish, who had earlier represented Aylesbury, Newtown, East Sussex, Youghal and Buckinghamshire in the House of Commons as a Liberal.

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For the area in Birmingham, England see Ley Hill, Birmingham

Vertical farming

Vertical farming is the practice of producing food and medicine in vertically stacked layers, vertically inclined surfaces and/or integrated in other structures. The modern ideas of vertical farming use indoor farming techniques and controlled-environment agriculture (CEA) technology, where all environmental factors can be controlled. These facilities utilize artificial control of light, environmental control and fertigation. Some vertical farms use techniques similar to greenhouses, where natural sunlight can be augmented with artificial lighting and metal reflectors.

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Thomas Harding English religious dissident

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Charles Cavendish, 3rd Baron Chesham British politician

Brigadier General Charles Compton William Cavendish, 3rd Baron Chesham, styled The Honourable Charles Cavendish between 1863 and 1882, was a British soldier, courtier and Conservative politician. He served as the last Master of the Buckhounds under Lord Salisbury from 1900 to 1901.

Whelpley Hill human settlement in United Kingdom

Whelpley Hill is a hamlet in the parish of Ashley Green in Buckinghamshire, England. It is located to the east of Chesham, near the border with Hertfordshire and is the site of an Iron Age hillfort.

St Marys Church, Chesham Anglican church in Buckinghamshire, England

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Chesham branch

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Tony Cliff British activist

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References

  1. Bullimore, John (20 July 1999). "Tony Harman". The Guardian . Retrieved 4 December 2011.