Tony Mack

Last updated
Tony Mack
Pitcher
Born: (1961-04-30) April 30, 1961 (age 59)
Lexington, Kentucky
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
July 27, 1985, for the  California Angels
Last MLB appearance
July 27, 1985, for the  California Angels
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 0-1
Earned run average 15.43
Strikeouts 0
Teams

Tony Lynn Mack (born April 30, 1961, in Lexington, Kentucky) is an American former professional baseball player who played one season for the California Angels of Major League Baseball(MLB). He played college baseball for the Lamar University Cardinals. [1] In 1981 he won a gold medal as a member of the United States national team in World Games I.

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