Toome Bridge railway station

Last updated

Toome Bridge
Former railway bridge at Toome - geograph.org.uk - 374157.jpg
Spanning time without a span, with the former railway bridge over the River Bann.
Location Toome Bridge, County Antrim
Northern Ireland
Coordinates 54°45′12″N6°27′41″W / 54.7533°N 6.4615°W / 54.7533; -6.4615 Coordinates: 54°45′12″N6°27′41″W / 54.7533°N 6.4615°W / 54.7533; -6.4615
Other information
StatusDisused
History
Original company Belfast and Ballymena Railway
Pre-grouping Belfast and Northern Counties Railway
Post-grouping Belfast and Northern Counties Railway
Key dates
10 November 1856Station opens
28 August 1950Station closes

Toome Bridge railway station was on the Belfast and Ballymena Railway which ran from Cookstown Junction to Cookstown in Northern Ireland. Located in Toome in County Antrim on the River Bann with County Londonderry across the river.

History

The station was opened by the Belfast and Ballymena Railway on 10 November 1856. [1] The station buildings were designed by the architect Charles Lanyon. [2]

The station closed to passengers on 28 August 1950.

Preceding station Historical railways Following station
Staffordstown   Belfast and Ballymena Railway
Cookstown Junction-Cookstown
  Castledawson

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References

  1. "Toome Bridge station" (PDF). Railscot - Irish Railways. Retrieved 29 April 2012.
  2. The Industrial Archaeology of Northern Ireland. William Alan McCutcheon, Northern Ireland. Department of the Environment, Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1984