Tripp of Dordrecht

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The Tripp family of Dordrecht were Dutch merchants who traded extensively in the Middle East, Russia and Scandinavia. [1] [2]

Dordrecht City and municipality in South Holland, Netherlands

Dordrecht, colloquially Dordt, historically in English named Dort, is a city and municipality in the Western Netherlands, located in the province of South Holland. It is the fourth-largest city of the province, with a population of 118,450. The municipality covers the entire Dordrecht Island, also often called Het Eiland van Dordt, bordered by the rivers Oude Maas, Beneden Merwede, Nieuwe Merwede, Hollands Diep, and Dordtsche Kil. Dordrecht is the largest and most important city in the Drechtsteden and is also part of the Randstad, the main conurbation in the Netherlands. Dordrecht is the oldest city in Holland and has a rich history and culture.

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References

  1. Chalmin, Philippe (1987), Traders and Merchants: Panorama of International Commodity Trading, Taylor & Francis, p. 6, ISBN   9783718604357
  2. J. N. Ball (1977), Merchants and Merchandise: The Expansion of Trade in Europe 1500-1630, Croom Helm, pp. 119–121, ISBN   9780312530082