Troy Kelley

Last updated
Troy Kelley
10th Auditor of Washington
In office
January 16, 2013 January 11, 2017
Governor Jay Inslee
Preceded by Brian Sonntag
Succeeded by Pat McCarthy
Member of the WashingtonHouseofRepresentatives
from the 28th district
In office
January 8, 2007 January 14, 2013
Preceded byGigi Talcott
Succeeded by Steve O'Ban
Personal details
Born
Troy Xavier Kelley

(1964-08-16) August 16, 1964 (age 57)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s)Diane Kelley
Education University of California, Berkeley (BA)
State University of New York, Buffalo (JD, MBA)
Website Official website
Military service
AllegianceFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Branch/serviceFlag of the United States Army.svg  United States Army
Years of service1994–present
Rank US-O5 insignia.svg Lieutenant Colonel
Unit Seal of the United States Army National Guard.svg Army National Guard

Troy Xavier Kelley (born August 16, 1964) is the former Washington State Auditor, and a member of the Democratic Party. [1] He is a lieutenant colonel JAG officer in the Washington National Guard. Kelley was a member of the Washington House of Representatives, representing the 28th Legislative District from 2007 to 2013. In 2017 he was convicted [2] of multiple counts of possession of stolen property, making false declarations in a court proceeding and tax fraud. [3]

He was elected as Washington State Auditor in 2012 [4] and was indicted by the United States Department of Justice for mortgage fraud and related crimes in early 2015. At the end of his first trial on April 26, 2016, he was acquitted of one charge of making false statements. The jury deadlocked on the remaining counts. The trial ended in a mistrial on 14 of the 15 counts. At the end of his retrial on December 20, 2017, he was acquitted of five charges of money laundering, and convicted of nine felony charges including counts of possession of stolen property, making false declarations in a court proceeding and tax fraud. [5] On April 26, 2018, in response to a motion by the defense, prosecutors conceded the count of conviction for corrupt interference with an IRS investigation should be dismissed after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the government’s theory was contrary to the law. On June 29, 2018, Kelley was sentenced to a year and a day in jail, plus a year's probation. A request for forfeiture of $1.4 million was rejected by the judge and a hearing on restitution was scheduled for September 2018. [6] On July 29, 2020, a three judge panel on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Kelley's conviction. [7] The United States Supreme Court denied Kelley's appeal [8] and Kelley began serving his 1-year sentence in July 2021. [9]

Electoral history

Washington State Auditor, General Election 2012 [10]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Troy Kelley1,512,62052.95
Republican James Watkins1,344,13747.05
Washington State Auditor, Primary Election 2012 [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican James Watkins584,44446.09
Democratic Troy Kelley291,33522.98
Democratic Craig Pridemore 268,22021.15
Democratic Mark Miloscia 123,9369.77
Washington's 28th Legislative District State Representative, Pos. 1, General Election 2010 [12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Troy Kelley (Incumbent)21,34752.87-7.33
Republican Steve O'Ban 19,02647.13
Washington's 28th Legislative District State Representative, Pos. 1, Primary Election 2010 [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Troy Kelley (Incumbent)12,05650.26-6.99
Republican Steve O'Ban 11,93249.74
Washington's 28th Legislative District State Representative, Pos. 1, General Election 2008 [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Troy Kelley (Incumbent)28,59160.20+8.54
Republican Dave Dooley18,90639.80
Washington's 28th Legislative District State Representative, Pos. 1, Primary Election 2008 [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Troy Kelley (Incumbent)14,28657.25-42.75
Republican Dave Dooley10,66942.75
Washington's 28th Legislative District State Representative, Pos. 1, General Election 2006 [16]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Troy Kelley17,75251.66
Republican Donald Anderson16,61348.34
Washington's 28th Legislative District State Representative, Pos. 1, Democratic Primary Election 2006 [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Troy Kelley9,766100.00
United States Representative, California's 49th Congressional District, Democratic Primary Election 1992 [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Lynn Schenk 32,30353.26
Democratic Byron Georgiou 14,87924.53
Democratic Bill Winston6,81111.23
Democratic Carol Lucke4,5947.57
Democratic Troy X. Kelley2,0663.41

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References

  1. "Washington State Auditor's Official website".
  2. "Former state auditor Troy Kelley convicted of 9 felonies in federal retrial on theft, tax-fraud charges". The Seattle Times. 2017-12-20. Retrieved 2019-02-10.
  3. "Former state auditor Troy Kelley convicted of 9 felonies in federal retrial on theft, tax-fraud charges". The Seattle Times. 2017-12-20. Retrieved 2019-02-10.
  4. "Troy Kelley". votesmart.org. Retrieved 2012-07-09.
  5. "Washington State Auditor Troy X. Kelley Indicted For Filing False Tax Returns, False Declarations, Obstruction And Possession Of Stolen Property" (Press release). U.S. Attorney’s Office for Western District of Washington. April 16, 2015. Retrieved April 16, 2015.
  6. Former Washington state auditor sentenced to year in prison, Seattle Times , Rachel La Corte (AP), June 29, 2018. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  7. "Ex-state auditor Troy Kelley's fraud conviction upheld, ordered to prison". KOMO News. 2020-07-29. Retrieved 2020-07-30.
  8. Jenkins, Austin (March 23, 2021). "Former WA state auditor faces prison after U.S. Supreme Court denies petition for review". KUOW. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  9. Jenkins, Jenkins (July 6, 2021). "Former Washington Auditor Troy Kelley reports to prison after last minute delay effort". KUOW NPR. Retrieved July 7, 2021.
  10. "Washington Secretary of State, 2012 General Election Results - State Auditor". vote.wa.gov. November 27, 2012. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  11. "Washington Secretary of State, 2012 Primary Election Results - State Auditor". vote.wa.gov. August 28, 2012. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  12. "Washington Secretary of State, 2010 General Election Results - Legislative District 28". vote.wa.gov. November 29, 2010. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  13. "Washington Secretary of State, 2010 Primary Election Results - Legislative District 28". vote.wa.gov. September 3, 2010. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  14. "Washington Secretary of State, 2008 General Election Results - Legislative District 28". vote.wa.gov. November 26, 2008. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  15. "Washington Secretary of State, 2008 Primary Election Results - Legislative District 28". vote.wa.gov. September 4, 2008. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  16. "Washington Secretary of State, 2006 General Election Results - Legislative District 28". vote.wa.gov. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  17. "Washington Secretary of State, 2006 Democratic Primary Election Results - Legislative District 28". vote.wa.gov. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  18. "California Secretary of State, 1992 Primary Election Results" (PDF). elections.cdn.sos.ca.gov. June 2, 1992. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
Political offices
Preceded by
Brian Sonntag
Auditor of Washington
2013–2017
Succeeded by
Pat McCarthy