Trunk Cay, United States Virgin Islands

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Trunk Cay
Trunk Bay, St. John USVI 02.jpg
Trunk Cay (foreground), as seen from an overlook.
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Trunk Cay
Location in the Caribbean
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Trunk Cay
Trunk Cay (Caribbean)
Geography
Location Caribbean Sea
Coordinates 18°21′18″N64°46′07″W / 18.3550°N 64.7687°W / 18.3550; -64.7687 Coordinates: 18°21′18″N64°46′07″W / 18.3550°N 64.7687°W / 18.3550; -64.7687
Administration
Federal Department U.S. Department of the Interior
Federal Agency U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Capital Washington, D.C.
Largest settlement New York City
President Joe Biden

Trunk Cay is a small grass-covered islet in Trunk Bay in the United States Virgin Islands. It has an elevation of 48 feet and is situated only 200 feet from Trunk Bay Beach. [1] It is an islet of rocky cliffs, coral sandy beaches, and palm trees. The Virgin Islands National Park Service offers underwater snorkelling trails around the cay. Trunk Cay is named for the leatherback turtle, which is found in the U.S.V.I. and is locally known as trunks. [2]

Related Research Articles

Trunk Bay

Trunk Bay is a body of water and a beach on St. John in the United States Virgin Islands. Trunk Bay is part of the Virgin Islands National Park. Trunk Bay is named for the Leatherback turtle, which is endemic to the U.S.V.I. and is locally known as trunks. The beach area is divided into two halves, the main Trunk Bay beach and swim area and Burgesman Cove which is located on the west end of Trunk Bay near Jumby Bay. Its amenities include a snack bar, showers and restrooms, a lifeguard, and an underwater trail for snorkeling its coral reef. Trunk Bay has consistently been voted one of the top beaches in the world.

Great Guana Cay

Great Guana Cay is an islet in The Bahamas. It is a long, narrow islet, 7 miles (11 km) long. It is in the centre of the Abaco Islands and is near Gumelemi Cay. It is about 8 miles from Marsh Harbour. Approximately 150 people live on the island, mostly along the five and a half mile long stretch of beach.

Cinnamon Bay

Cinnamon Bay is a body of water and a beach on St. John island, within Virgin Islands National Park, in the United States Virgin Islands.

Bellamy Cay

Bellamy Cay is an island in the British Virgin Islands, located entirely within Trellis Bay on Beef Island. Formerly called Blanco Islet, this island is named after its most famous resident, "Black Sam" Bellamy, the "prince of pirates".

Cooper Island (British Virgin Islands)

Cooper Island, formerly known as Bergen Island under Sweden-Norway administration until 1905 is a small island of the British Virgin Islands in the Caribbean. There are five privately owned properties on the island, plus a small beach club resort. Cooper Island Beach Club has 12 hotel rooms, a restaurant, rum bar, coffee shop, solar powered brewery, and gift shop. Facilities are open to guests, day visitors and yachts using the nearby moorings. Manchioneel Bay features 30 mooring balls that accommodate vessels up to 60 feet.

Sandy Spit

Sandy Spit is an uninhabited islet of the British Virgin Islands in the Caribbean, sitting midway between Sandy Cay and Green Cay. It measures less than half an acre in size, and consists entirely of a ring of sandy beach surrounding light foliage. It has the appearance of a classic paradise "desert island" and has been photographed for use in print medium in a number of advertising campaigns. Sandy Spit is a popular stop for day and term boat charters from Tortola, St. Thomas, and St. John. There are no moorings, but the sandy bottom is suitable for anchoring.

Index of United States Virgin Islands–related articles Wikipedia index

The following is an alphabetical list of articles related to the territory of the United States Virgin Islands.

Carvel Rock (United States Virgin Islands)

Carvel Rock is an uninhabited islet of the US Virgin Islands in the Caribbean, less than 2 acres in size. It is visited by boats as a scuba diving site, but its sheer cliffs and lack of a beach mean that landing would be practically impossible.

Protestant Cay

Protestant Cay is a four-acre triangular islet in the Christiansted Harbor, 200 yards north of Christiansted. The island is home to a resort, the Hotel on the Cay, which is home to a protected sand beach, small shop and beach bar. It also has the closest beach to Downtown Christiansted. With one of the ferries, which run from 7 a.m. to 12 a.m., every ten minutes, it will only take about two minutes to get there. The ride is free of charge after 4 p.m., and for guests of the Hotel on the Cay. To get on the ferry, passengers have to stand near the boardwalk in front of the King Christian Hotel and wave to the boat captain on duty.

Steven Cay, United States Virgin Islands

Steven Cay is a small scrub-covered and rocky Caribbean island, about 28 feet high and situated 0.5 miles west of Cruz Bay on Saint John in the United States Virgin Islands. It is a popular destination for snorkelers and scuba divers,.

Turtledove Cay, United States Virgin Islands

Turtledove Cay is a rocky 3.78 acre islet, located 100 yards north of Saba Island in the United States Virgin Islands. Its elevation is 50 feet and the islet is covered with tall grass. It is joined with Saba Island by a reef, which is bare at times of extremely low water. Turtledove Cay are all designated wildlife reserves by the territorial U.S.V.I. government. Turtledove Cay is home to large quantities of native avifauna, including large colonies of noddies and other seabirds.

Whistling Cay, United States Virgin Islands

Whistling Cay is a 19-acre (7.7 ha) islet, situated 300 yards (270 m) west of Mary Point on Saint John in the United States Virgin Islands. It is covered with trees and high cliffs in the north, where it reaches a 130-foot (40 m) elevation. A gravel beach is located on the southeast side of the island. It is separated from Saint John by the Fungi Passage, which has a depth of 21 feet (6.4 m).

Kalkun Cay, United States Virgin Islands

Kalkun Cay is a rocky, steep and narrow islet, located in the middle of the Savana Passage in the United States Virgin Islands. It is one mile northeast of Savana Island and one mile west of West Point on the island of Saint Thomas. Kalkun Cay is 73 feet high and covered with underbrush and grass. It is an important habitat of native seabirds.

Ramgoat Cay, United States Virgin Islands

Ramgoat Cay is an islet in the United States Virgin Islands, located 310 yards northeast of Henley Cay and 1300 feet north of Hawksnest Point on the island of Saint John. It is 30 feet high and located within the Virgin Islands National Park.

Leduck Island

Leduck Island is an island in the United States Virgin Islands, also spelled LeDuck Island, which is located 0.5 miles east of Sabbat Point in Johns Folly, separated from Saint John by the Sabbat Channel. LeDuck Island lies by the entrance to Coral Bay and is 85 feet high. Leduck Island is located within the Virgin Islands National Park and is one of the largest offshore islands to Saint John, along with Grass Cay and Congo Cay.

Henley Cay

Henley Cay, previously known as Women's Cay, is an 11-acre tropical islet in the United States Virgin Islands. The cay is 300 yards in diameter and the largest and southernmost of the Durloe Cays in the Virgin Islands National Park. Henley Cay is situated 2,200 feet northwest of Turtle Bay on the island of Saint John, separated from the island by the Durloe Channel. The cay is 70 feet high and has a pier on its southern side, although it is uninhabited. The island is known as a snorkeling and kayaking destination, but is also visited for its white sandy beaches. Companies offer guided kayak tours from Cruz Bay, Honeymoon Bay, and Caneel Bay to Henley- and Lovango Cays.

Cinnamon Cay

Cinnamon Cay is a cay in the United States Virgin Islands, situated approximately 0.7 miles east of Trunk Cay in the Cinnamon Bay, and 100 yards from the shore at Cinnamon Bay Beach on Saint John island. It has a height of 32 feet. The islet is uninhabited, but regularly visited by scuba-divers, snorkelers and kayakers. Cinnamon Bay Watersports offers kayaks and snorkeling equipment for travelers to the cay. Cinnamon Cay is mostly covered with grass and cactus, and is located within the Virgin Islands National Park.

East End, Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands Subdistrict

East End is an administrative subdistrict of the island of Saint Thomas in the United States Virgin Islands. The largest community here is Red Hook, while smaller communities include Benner, Nazareth, Nadir, Frydendal, and Smith Bay. Some of the offshore islands here include Great Saint James Island, Little Saint James Island, Bovoni Cay, Patricia Cay, Cas Cay, Rotto Cay, Thatch Cay, Shark Island, and Dog Island. The East End subdistrict received 731 new residents between the 2000 U.S. Census and the 2010 U.S. Census, and has a 2010 population of 6,658. The East End region offers a more secluded character and less population density than subdistricts as Charlotte Amalie, Southside, and the Tutu subdistricts. This subdistrict is home to numerous of the islands’ largest resorts, in addition to many shopping areas and entertainment venues, as well as the Coral World Marine Park & Underwater Observatory in Coki Point, which is the most popular tourist attraction on Saint Thomas. East End is located about 7.4 miles east of the territorial capital of Charlotte Amalie, which is an approximately thirty-minute drive on the windy, small and narrow Saint Thomas roads. There are buses and taxis leaving from the East End. A typical fare for a taxi drive to the capital costs $20. The hotels on Saint Thomas are evenly divided between the two subdistricts of Charlotte Amalie, and the more expensive resort-style hotels by their own beachside in East End. The East End resorts are therefore generally more expensive than those found elsewhere on the island. Some of the famous beaches found here are Lindquist- and Sapphire Beaches, while others include Pineapple Beach and Vessup Beach amongst others.

Northside, Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands Subdistrict

Northside with its population of 10,049 as of the 2010 United States Census is the second-most populous administrative census subdistrict (CSD) on Saint Thomas, only less populated than the Charlotte Amalie subregion with the islands’ territorial capital of more than 18,000 people. Northside is sometimes called Nordside in Virgin Islands Creole, which is the Danish translation for north side. Northside is home to communities such as Neltjeberg, Zambee, Resolution, Ensomned, Barrett, Solberg, Lerkenlund, Misgen, Mafolie, Louisenhoj, Estate Thomas, Mandal, Enighed, Canaan, and Peterborg. By area, the Northside subdistrict is the largest administrative census sub-district on the Saint Thomas island.

References

  1. Griffes, Peter L. (2004). 2004 Atlantic Boating Almanac: Gulf of Mexico. ProStar Publications. Page 536. ISBN   9781577855125.
  2. Potter, Susanna H. (2013). Virgin Islands. Avalon Travel. Page 78. ISBN   9781612383682.