UEFA Women's Euro 1995

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UEFA Women's Euro 1995
Fußball-Europameisterschaft der Frauen 1995
EM i fotball for kvinner 1995
Europamästerskapet i fotboll för damer 1995
Tournament details
Host countriesEngland
Germany (final)
Norway
Sweden
Dates26 March (final)
Teams4
Venue(s)4 (in 4 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Germany.svg  Germany (3rd title)
Runners-upFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Tournament statistics
Matches played5
Goals scored25 (5 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Sweden.svg Lena Videkull (3 goals)
Best player(s) Flag of Germany.svg Birgit Prinz
1993
1997

The 1995 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1995 was a football tournament that happened between 1993 and 1995 (with the qualifying round). The final game was held in Germany. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe. [1]

Germany Federal parliamentary republic in central-western Europe

Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a country in Central and Western Europe, lying between the Baltic and North Seas to the north, and the Alps to the south. It borders Denmark to the north, Poland and the Czech Republic to the east, Austria and Switzerland to the south, France to the southwest, and Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands to the west.

UEFA Womens Championship European association football tournament for womens national teams

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro and unofficially the "European Cup", held every fourth year, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA Confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

Contents

Germany won the competition for the third time (counting with West Germany's victory in the former European Competition for Representative Women's Teams).

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

Format

In the qualifying round, 29 teams divided into 8 groups (some of 3, some of 4 teams) and the winner of each group would be qualified into the quarter-finals of the Competition. Then, and until the final, teams played 2-leg knockout rounds. In the final, only one game would be played and the winner would be proclaimed the Champion.

Qualification

Squads

For a list of all squads that played in the final tournament, see 1995 UEFA Women's Championship squads

Results

Semifinals

First leg

England  Flag of England.svg14Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Farley Soccerball shade.svg 7' DFB Report (in German) Mohr Soccerball shade.svg 32', 80'
Brocker Soccerball shade.svg 68'
Wiegmann Soccerball shade.svg 87' (pen.)
Attendance: 800
Referee: Sándor Piller (Hungary)
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg43Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Aarønes Soccerball shade.svg 44', 64'
Sandberg Soccerball shade.svg 60'
Waage Soccerball shade.svg 89'
NFF Report (in Norwegian)
SvFF Report (in Swedish)
Kalte Soccerball shade.svg 15'
Andelén Soccerball shade.svg 55'
H. Johansson Soccerball shade.svg 61'
Attendance: 2,098
Referee: Finn Lambek (Denmark)

Second leg

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg21Flag of England.svg  England
Waller Soccerball shade.svg 34' (o.g.)
Prinz Soccerball shade.svg 79'
DFB Report (in German) Farley Soccerball shade.svg 1'
Attendance: 7,000
Referee: Kostadin Guerginov (Bulgaria)

Germany won 62 on aggregate.

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg41Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Kalte Soccerball shade.svg 53'
Videkull Soccerball shade.svg 59', 61', 76'
NFF Report (in Norwegian)
SvFF Report (in Swedish)
Medalen Soccerball shade.svg 28'
Attendance: 2,147
Referee: William Young (Scotland)

Sweden won 75 on aggregate.

Final

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg3–2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Meinert Soccerball shade.svg 33'
Prinz Soccerball shade.svg 64'
Wiegmann Soccerball shade.svg 85'
DFB Report (in German)
SvFF Report (in Swedish)
Andersson Soccerball shade.svg 6'
Andelén Soccerball shade.svg 89'
Fritz-Walter-Stadion, Kaiserslautern
Attendance: 8,500
Referee: Ilkka Koho (Finland)

Awards

 Women's Euro 1995 Champions 
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
Third title

Goalscorers

3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
Own goal

See also

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References

  1. "1995: Germany establish upper hand –". Uefa.com. Retrieved 2012-08-23.