UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying

Last updated
UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying
Tournament details
Dates4 April 2015 – 25 October 2016
Teams46 (from 1 confederation)
Tournament statistics
Matches played174
Goals scored672 (3.86 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Iceland.svg Harpa Þorsteinsdóttir
Flag of Norway.svg Ada Hegerberg
Flag of Scotland.svg Jane Ross
(10 goals each)
2013
2021

The UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying competition was a women's football competition that determined the 15 teams joining the automatically qualified hosts Netherlands in the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 final tournament. [1]

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Netherlands womens national football team Womens national association football team representing the Netherlands

The Netherlands women's national football team is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

UEFA Womens Euro 2017 2017 edition of the UEFA Womens Championship

The 2017 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2017, was the 12th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. The competition was expanded to 16 teams.

Contents

A total of 46 UEFA member national teams, with Andorra entering for the first time at senior women's level, entered the qualifying competition. [2]

The Andorra women's national football team represents Andorra in women's association football and is controlled by the Andorran Football Federation, the governing body for football in Andorra.

Format

The qualifying competition consisted of three rounds: [3]

Tiebreakers

In the preliminary round and qualifying group stage, the teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss). If two or more teams are equal on points on completion of a group, the following tie-breaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings (Regulations Articles 13.01, 13.02 and 15.01): [3]

  1. Higher number of points obtained in the mini-tournament or group matches played among the teams in question;
  2. Superior goal difference resulting from the mini-tournament or group matches played among the teams in question;
  3. Higher number of goals scored in the mini-tournament or group matches played among the teams in question;
  4. (Qualifying group stage only) Higher number of goals scored away from home in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  5. If, after having applied criteria 1 to 4, teams still have an equal ranking, criteria 1 to 4 are reapplied exclusively to the mini-tournament or group matches between the teams in question to determine their final rankings. If this procedure does not lead to a decision, criteria 6 to 11 apply;
  6. Superior goal difference in all mini-tournament or group matches;
  7. Higher number of goals scored in all mini-tournament or group matches;
  8. (Qualifying group stage only) Higher number of away goals scored in all group matches;
  9. (Preliminary round only) If only two teams have the same number of points, and they are tied according to criteria 1 to 7 after having met in the last round of the mini-tournament, their rankings are determined by a penalty shoot-out (not used if more than two teams have the same number of points, or if their rankings are not relevant for qualification for the next stage).
  10. Lower disciplinary points total based only on yellow and red cards received in the mini-tournament or group matches (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  11. Position in the UEFA women's national team coefficient ranking for the preliminary round or qualifying group stage draw.

To determine the six best runners-up from the qualifying group stage, the results against the teams in fifth place are discarded. The following criteria are applied (Regulations Article 15.02): [3]

  1. Higher number of points;
  2. Superior goal difference;
  3. Higher number of goals scored;
  4. Higher number of away goals scored;
  5. Lower disciplinary points total based only on yellow and red cards received (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  6. Position in the UEFA women's national team coefficient ranking for the qualifying group stage draw.

In the play-offs, the team that scores more goals on aggregate over the two legs qualifies for the final tournament. If the aggregate score is level, the away goals rule is applied, i.e., the team that scores more goals away from home over the two legs advances. If away goals are also equal, extra time is played. The away goals rule is again applied after extra time, i.e., if there are goals scored during extra time and the aggregate score is still level, the visiting team advances by virtue of more away goals scored. If no goals are scored during extra time, the tie is decided by penalty shoot-out (Regulations Articles 16.01 and 16.02). [3]

The away goals rule is a method of breaking ties in association football and other sports when teams play each other twice, once at each team's home ground. By the away goals rule, the team that has scored more goals "away from home" will win if scores are otherwise equal. This is sometimes expressed by saying that away goals "count double" in the event of a tie.

A penalty shoot-out is a method of determining which team is awarded victory in an association football match that cannot end in a draw, when the score is tied after the regulation playing time as well as extra time have expired. In a penalty shoot-out, each team takes turns shooting at goal from the penalty mark, with the goal only defended by the opposing team's goalkeeper. Each team has five shots which must be taken by different kickers; the team that makes more successful kicks is declared the victor. Shoot-outs finish as soon as one team has an insurmountable lead. If scores are level after five pairs of shots, the shootout progresses into additional "sudden-death" rounds. Balls successfully kicked into the goal during a shoot-out do not count as goals for the individual kickers or the team, and are tallied separately from the goals scored during normal play. Although the procedure for each individual kick in the shoot-out resembles that of a penalty kick, there are some differences. Most notably, neither the kicker nor any player other than the goalkeeper may play the ball again once it has been kicked.

Schedule

The qualifying matches are played on dates that fall within the FIFA Women's International Match Calendar. [4]

StageFIFA International Dates
Preliminary round4–9 April 2015
Qualifying group stage14–22 September 2015
19–27 October 2015
23 November – 1 December 2015
18–26 January 2016
29 February – 9 March 2016
4–12 April 2016
30 May – 7 June 2016
12–20 September 2016
Play-offs17–25 October 2016

Entrants

The teams were ranked according to their coefficient ranking, calculated based on the following: [5]

The 38 highest-ranked teams entered the qualifying group stage, while the eight lowest-ranked teams entered the preliminary round. [6] The coefficient ranking was also used for seeding in the qualifying group stage draw.

Final tournament hosts
TeamCoeffRank
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 34,4868
Teams entering qualifying group stage
Pot A
TeamCoeffRank
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 43,6651
Flag of France.svg  France 42,5522
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 42,4333
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 39,3154
Flag of England.svg  England 38,1335
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 36,6666
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 35,9417
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 32,7789
Pot B
TeamCoeffRank
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 32,71210
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 32,61511
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 32,60512
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 32,55813
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 31,26414
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 29,84715
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 29,06416
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 28,82517
Pot C
TeamCoeffRank
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 27,55518
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 25,75019
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 25,07020
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 24,58121
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 22,95422
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 22,43423
Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 21,74724
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 21,63425
Pot D
TeamCoeffRank
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 20,92526
Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 18,14127
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 17,69128
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 16,80629
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 15,52830
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 14,84131
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 14,73632
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 14,21933
Pot E
TeamCoeffRank
Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 13,28134
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 13,11135
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 12,59136
Flag of Albania.svg  Albania 9,99138
Flag of Macedonia.svg  Macedonia 8,03240
Flag of Montenegro.svg  Montenegro 7,44341
Teams entering preliminary round
TeamCoeffRank
Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg  Faroe Islands 7,35742
Flag of Malta.svg  Malta (H)6,72344
Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia 6,06345
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 4,58546
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 4,04247
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 3,91848
Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra
Flag of Moldova.svg  Moldova (H)
Notes
Did not enter
TeamCoeffRank
Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 11,37537
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 9,96039
Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia 7,27543
Flag of Cyprus.svg  Cyprus
Flag of Gibraltar.svg  Gibraltar
Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein
Flag of San Marino.svg  San Marino

Preliminary round

Draw

The draw for the preliminary round was held on 19 January 2015, 13:45 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. [7] [8]

The teams were divided into two pots: Pot 1 contained the two teams which were pre-selected as hosts (Malta and Moldova), while Pot 2 contained the six remaining teams (Andorra, Faroe Islands, Georgia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Luxembourg). Each group contained one team from Pot 1 and three teams from Pot 2. [9]

Groups

  The two group winners advanced to the qualifying group stage.

Group 1

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of Moldova.svgFlag of Latvia.svgFlag of Lithuania.svgFlag of Luxembourg.svg
1Flag of Moldova.svg  Moldova (H)320151+46 Qualifying group stage 0–1 2–0
2Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 31115504 1–1
3Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 31113304 2–0
4Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 31024843 0–3 4–3
Source: UEFA
(H) Host.

Group 2

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of Georgia.svgFlag of the Faroe Islands.svgFlag of Malta.svgFlag of Andorra.svg
1Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia 3201102+86 [lower-alpha 1] Qualifying group stage 2–0 1–2
2Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg  Faroe Islands 3201124+86 [lower-alpha 1] 8–0
3Flag of Malta.svg  Malta (H)320198+16 [lower-alpha 1] 2–4
4Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra 3003320170 0–7 3–5
Source: UEFA
(H) Host.
Notes:
  1. 1 2 3 Ranked by head-to-head record (Georgia: 3 pts, +1 GD; Faroe Islands: 3 pts, 0 GD; Malta: 3 pts, −1 GD).

Qualifying group stage

Draw

The draw for the qualifying group stage was held on 20 April 2015, 14:00 CEST (UTC+2), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. [10] [11]

The teams were seeded according to their coefficient ranking (see section Entrants). [12] Each group contained one team from each of the five seeding pots. [13] The two teams which qualified from the preliminary round, Moldova and Georgia, were placed in Pot E for the group stage draw.

Groups

  The eight group winners and the six best group runners-up (not counting results against fifth-placed team) qualified directly for the final tournament.
  The remaining two runners-up advanced to the play-offs.

Group 1

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of Iceland.svgFlag of Scotland.svgFlag of Slovenia.svgFlag of Belarus.svgFlag of Macedonia.svg
1Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 8701342+3221 [lower-alpha 1] Final tournament 1–2 4–0 2–0 8–0
2Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 8701307+2321 [lower-alpha 1] 0–4 3–1 7–0 10–0
3Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 83052119+29 [lower-alpha 2] 0–6 0–3 3–0 8–1
4Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 83051020109 [lower-alpha 2] 0–5 0–1 2–0 6–2
5Flag of Macedonia.svg  Macedonia 8008451470 0–4 1–4 0–9 0–2
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. 1 2 Head-to-head results: Scotland 0–4 Iceland, Iceland 1–2 Scotland.
  2. 1 2 Head-to-head results: Slovenia 3–0 Belarus, Belarus 2–0 Slovenia.

Group 2

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of Spain.svgFlag of Portugal.svgFlag of Finland.svgFlag of Ireland.svgFlag of Montenegro.svg
1Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 8800392+3724 Final tournament 2–0 5–0 3–0 13–0
2Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 84131511+413 [lower-alpha 1] Play-offs 1–4 3–2 1–2 6–1
3Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 84131712+513 [lower-alpha 1] 1–2 0–0 4–1 1–0
4Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 83051714+39 0–3 0–1 0–2 9–0
5Flag of Montenegro.svg  Montenegro 8008251490 0–7 0–3 1–7 0–5
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. 1 2 Head-to-head results: Finland 0–0 Portugal, Portugal 3–2 Finland.

Group 3

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of France.svgFlag of Romania.svgFlag of Ukraine.svgFlag of Greece.svgFlag of Albania.svg
1Flag of France.svg  France 8800270+2724 Final tournament 3–0 4–0 1–0 6–0
2Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 8512178+916 Play-offs 0–1 2–1 4–0 3–0
3Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 84131412+213 0–3 2–2 2–0 2–0
4Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 8206919106 0–3 1–3 1–3 3–2
5Flag of Albania.svg  Albania 8008331280 0–6 0–3 0–4 1–4
Source: UEFA

Group 4

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of Sweden.svgFlag of Denmark.svgFlag of Poland.svgFlag of Slovakia.svgFlag of Moldova.svg
1Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 8701223+1921 Final tournament 1–0 3–0 2–1 6–0
2Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 8611221+2119 2–0 6–0 4–0 4–0
3Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 83141016610 0–4 0–0 2–0 4–0
4Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 8305111329 0–3 0–1 2–1 4–0
5Flag of Moldova.svg  Moldova 8008133320 0–3 0–5 1–3 0–4
Source: UEFA

Group 5

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of Germany.svgFlag of Russia.svgFlag of Hungary.svgFlag of Croatia.svgFlag of Turkey.svg
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 8800350+3524 Final tournament 2–0 12–0 2–0 7–0
2Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 8422149+514 0–4 3–3 5–0 2–0
3Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 8224820128 0–1 0–1 2–0 1–0
4Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 821581577 0–1 0–3 1–1 3–0
5Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 8116324214 0–6 0–0 2–1 1–4
Source: UEFA

Group 6

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of Switzerland.svgFlag of Italy.svgFlag of the Czech Republic.svgUlster Banner.svgFlag of Georgia.svg
1Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 8800343+3124 Final tournament 2–1 5–1 4–0 4–0
2Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 8602268+1818 0–3 3–1 3–1 6–1
3Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 83141318510 0–5 0–3 3–0 4–1
4Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 82151022127 1–8 0–3 1–1 4–0
5Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia 8008234320 0–3 0–7 0–3 0–3
Source: UEFA

Group 7

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of England.svgFlag of Belgium (civil).svgFlag of Serbia.svgFlag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svgFlag of Estonia.svg
1Flag of England.svg  England 8710321+3122 Final tournament 1–1 7–0 1–0 5–0
2Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 8521275+2217 0–2 1–1 6–0 6–0
3Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 831410211110 0–7 1–3 0–1 3–0
4Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 830581799 0–1 0–5 2–4 4–0
5Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 8008033330 0–8 0–5 0–1 0–1
Source: UEFA

Group 8

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of Norway.svgFlag of Austria.svgFlag of Wales (1959-present).svgFlag of Kazakhstan.svgFlag of Israel.svg
1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 8710292+2722 Final tournament 2–2 4–0 10–0 5–0
2Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 8521184+1417 0–1 3–0 6–1 4–0
3Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 83231311+211 0–2 0–0 4–0 3–0
4Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 8116230284 0–4 0–2 0–4 1–0
5Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 8026217152 0–1 0–1 2–2 0–0
Source: UEFA

Ranking of second-placed teams

To determine the six best second-placed teams from the qualifying group stage which qualified directly for the final tournament and the two remaining second-placed teams which advanced to the play-offs, only the results of the second-placed teams against the first, third, and fourth-placed teams in their group were taken into account, while results against the fifth-placed team were not included. As a result, six matches played by each second-placed team were counted for the purposes of determining the ranking. [14]

PosGrpTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1 1 Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 6501166+1015 Final tournament
2 4 Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 6411131+1213
3 6 Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 6402137+612
4 7 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 6321165+1111
5 8 Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 6321134+911
6 5 Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 6312129+310
7 3 Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 6312118+310 Play-offs
8 2 Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 621361047
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) goals scored; 4) away goals scored; 5) disciplinary points; 6) coefficient.

Play-offs

Draw

The draw for the play-offs (to decide the order of legs) was held on 23 September 2016, 14:00 CEST (UTC+2), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. [15] [16]

Matches

The play-off winner qualifies for the final tournament.

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Portugal  Flag of Portugal.svg(a) 1–1Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 0–0 1–1 (a.e.t.)

Qualified teams

The following 16 teams qualify for the final tournament.

TeamQualified asQualified onPrevious appearances in tournament 1
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Hosts4 December 2014 [1] 2 (2009, 2013)
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Group 1 winners16 September 20162 (2009, 2013)
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain Group 2 winners7 June 20162 (1997, 2013)
Flag of France.svg  France Group 3 winners11 April 20165 (1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013)
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Group 4 winners15 September 20169 ( 1984 , 1987, 1989, 1995, 1997 , 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013 )
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Group 5 winners12 April 20169 ( 1989 2 , 1991 , 1993, 1995 , 1997 , 2001 , 2005 , 2009 , 2013 )
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Group 6 winners4 June 20160 (debut)
Flag of England.svg  England Group 7 winners7 June 20167 (1984, 1987, 1995, 2001, 2005 , 2009, 2013)
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Group 8 winners7 June 201610 ( 1987 , 1989, 1991, 1993 , 1995, 1997 , 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013)
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland Best six runners-up 16 September 20160 (debut)
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Best six runners-up 20 September 20168 (1984, 1991 , 1993, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013)
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Best six runners-up 20 September 201610 (1984, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993 , 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013)
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Best six runners-up 16 September 20160 (debut)
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Best six runners-up 20 September 20160 (debut)
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Best six runners-up 20 September 20164 (1997, 2001, 2009, 2013)
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal Play-off winners25 October 20160 (debut)
1Bold indicates champion for that year. Italic indicates host for that year.

Top goalscorers

Players with six goals or more. [17]

10 goals
8 goals
7 goals
6 goals

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