Vasasszonyfa

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Vasasszonyfa
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Vasasszonyfa
Location of Vasasszonyfa
Coordinates: 47°18′47″N16°40′13″E / 47.31305°N 16.67033°E / 47.31305; 16.67033 Coordinates: 47°18′47″N16°40′13″E / 47.31305°N 16.67033°E / 47.31305; 16.67033
Country Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
County Vas
Area
  Total 10.65 km2 (4.11 sq mi)
Population (2004)
  Total 385
  Density 36.15/km2 (93.6/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
  Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal code 9744
Area code(s) 94

Vasasszonyfa is a village in Vas county, Hungary.

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