Virginia Cavaliers women's basketball

Last updated
Virginia Cavaliers women's basketball
Basketball current event.svg 2022–23 Virginia Cavaliers women's basketball team
Virginia Cavaliers wordmark 2020, Virginia.png
University University of Virginia
Head coach Amaka Agugua-Hamilton (1st season)
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Location Charlottesville, Virginia
Arena John Paul Jones Arena
(Capacity: 14,858)
Nickname Cavaliers
ColorsOrange and blue [1]
   
Uniforms
Kit body thinsidesonwhite.png
Kit body basketball.svg
Kit shorts blanksides2.png
Kit shorts.svg
Home
Kit body thinorangesides 2.png
Kit body basketball.svg
Kit shorts orangesides.png
Kit shorts.svg
Away
Kit body thinmidnightbluesides.png
Kit body basketball.svg
Kit shorts midnightbluesides.png
Kit shorts.svg
Alternate
NCAA Tournament Runner-up
1991
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1990, 1991, 1992
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000
NCAA Tournament Second round
1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2018
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2018
Conference tournament champions
1990, 1992, 1993
Conference regular season champions
1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2000

The Virginia Cavaliers women's basketball team represents the University of Virginia in women's basketball. The school competes in the Atlantic Coast Conference in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The Cavaliers play home basketball games at John Paul Jones Arena in Charlottesville, Virginia. [2] They are currently coached by Amaka Agugua-Hamilton, who was hired on March 21, 2022. [3]

Contents

Season records since 1990

The Cavaliers reached the Final Four in three consecutive seasons, reaching the title game in 1991, losing 70–67 to Tennessee in overtime. [4] [5]

SeasonRecordConference recordCoach
1989–9029–611–3 (2nd) Debbie Ryan
1990–9131–314–0 (1st)
1991–9232–215–1 (1st)
1992–9326–613–3 (1st)
1993–9427–515–1 (1st)
1994–9527–516–0 (1st)
1995–9626–713–3 (1st)
1996–9723–812–4 (2nd)
1997–9819–109–7 (5th)
1998–9920–912–4 (2nd)
1999-0025–913–3 (1st)
2000–0118–148–8 (5th)
2001–0217–139–7 (T-3rd)
2002–0317–149–7 (3rd)
2003–0413–166–10 (7th)
2004–0521–118–6 (5th)
2005–0620–125–9 (9th)
2006–0719–155–9 (8th)
2007–0824–1010–4 (T-3rd)
2008–0924–108–6 (T-5th)
2009–1021–109–5 (3rd)
2010–1119–165–9 (T-8th)
2011–1225–119–7 (T-5th) Joanne Boyle
2012–1316–148–10 (6th)
2013–1414–176–10 (10th)
2014–15 17–147–9 (9th)
2015–16 18–166–10 (9th)
2016–17 20–137–9 (7th)
2017–18 19–1410–6 (T-6th)
2018–19 12–195–11 (12th) Tina Thompson
2019–20 13–178–10 (T-9th)
2020–21 0–50–2 (N/A)
2021–22 5–222–16 (T-14th)
2022–23 Amaka Agugua-Hamilton

NCAA tournament results

The Cavaliers have appeared in 25 NCAA Tournaments, with a record of 34-25.

YearSeedRoundOpponentResult
1984 #5First Round#4 NC StateL 86-73
1985 #6First Round#3 TennesseeL 65-55
1986 #1First Round#8 James MadisonL 71-62
1987 #3First Round
Sweet Sixteen
#6 Memphis
#2 Tennessee
W 76-75
L 77-58
1988 #2First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#7 St. John's
#3 Rutgers
#1 Tennessee
W 85-64
W 89-75
L 84-76
1989 #4Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#12 West Virginia
#1 Tennessee
W 81-68
L 80-47
1990 #2Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#7 Penn State
#3 Providence
#1 Tennessee
#1 Stanford
W 85-64
W 77-71
W 79-75 (OT)
L 75-66
1991 #1Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Championship
#8 Stephen F. Austin
#5 Oklahoma State
#10 Lamar
#3 Connecticut
1 Tennessee
W 74-72
W 76-61
W 85-70
W 61-55
L 70-67 (OT)
1992 #1Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#8 George Washington
#4 West Virginia
#3 Vanderbilt
#1 Stanford
W 97-58
W 103-83
W 70-58
L 66-65
1993 #2Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#10 Florida
#6 Georgetown
#1 Ohio State
W 69-55
W 77-57
L 75-73
1994 #3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#14 Loyola (MD)
#6 SW Missouri State
#2 USC
W 72-47
W 67-63
L 85-66
1995 #3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#14 Dartmouth
#6 Florida
#2 Louisiana Tech
#1 Connecticut
W 71-68
W 72-67
W 63-62
L 67-63
1996 #3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#14 Manhattan
#6 George Washington
#2 Old Dominion
#1 Tennessee
W 100-55
W 62-43
W 72-60
L 52-46
1997 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Troy State
#5 Utah
#1 Stanford
W 96-74
W 65-46
L 91-69
1998 #6First Round
Second Round
#11 SMU
#3 Arizona
W 77-68
L 94-77
1999 #9First Round#8 Penn StateL 82-69
2000 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Pepperdine
#5 Boston College
#1 Tennessee
W 74-62
W 74-70
L 77-56
2001 #9First Round#8 MichiganL 81-71
2002 #8First Round#9 IowaL 69-62
2003 #8First Round
Second Round
#9 Illinois
#1 Tennessee
W 72-56
L 81-51
2005 #6First Round
Second Round
#11 Old Dominion
#3 Minnesota
W 79-57
L 73-58
2008 #4First Round
Second Round
#13 UC Santa Barbara
#5 Old Dominion
W 86-52
L 88-85 (OT)
2009 #5First Round
Second Round
#12 Marquette
#4 California
W 68-61
L 99-73
2010 #5First Round#12 Green BayL 69-67
2018 #10First Round
Second Round
#7 California
#2 South Carolina
W 68-62
L 66-56

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">University of Virginia</span> Public university in Charlottesville, Virginia

The University of Virginia is a public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia, founded in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson. Having been governed by three Founding Fathers of the United States, it is the flagship university of Virginia and is home to the Academical Village, preserved by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. The university has been referred to as a "Public Ivy" for offering an academic experience similar to that of an Ivy League university, and is known in part for certain rare characteristics among public universities such as its historic foundations, student-run honor code, and secret societies.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Paul Jones Arena</span> University of Virginia basketball court

John Paul Jones Arena, or JPJ, is a multi-purpose arena owned by the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. Since November 2006, it serves as the home to the Virginia Cavaliers men's and women's basketball teams, as well as for concerts and other events. With seating for 14,623 fans John Paul Jones Arena is the largest indoor arena in Virginia and the biggest Atlantic Coast Conference basketball arena located outside of large metropolitan areas. Sports Illustrated named John Paul Jones Arena the best new college basketball arena of the 2000s.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tony Bennett (basketball)</span> American basketball coach and player (born 1969)

Anthony Guy Bennett is an American former professional basketball player and since 2009 the head coach of the University of Virginia men's team, with whom he won the NCAA Championship in 2019. Bennett is a three-time recipient of the Henry Iba Award, two-time Naismith College Coach of the Year, and two-time AP Coach of the Year. Bennett holds records for career winning percentage and single-season wins at both Virginia and Washington State, and is one of three coaches in history to lead his program to ten or more consecutive winning ACC records. Bennett is also one of three coaches to receive the ACC Coach of the Year award four or more times.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">University of Virginia's College at Wise</span>

The University of Virginia's College at Wise is a public liberal arts college in Wise, Virginia. It is part of the University of Virginia and was established in 1954 as Clinch Valley College of the University of Virginia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Virginia Cavaliers</span> University of Virginia intercollegiate sports teams

The Virginia Cavaliers, also known as Wahoos or Hoos, are the athletic teams representing the University of Virginia, located in Charlottesville. The Cavaliers compete at the NCAA Division I level, in the Atlantic Coast Conference since 1953. Known simply as Virginia or UVA in sports media, the athletics program has twice won the Capital One Cup for men's sports after leading the nation in overall athletic excellence in those years. The Cavaliers have regularly placed among the nation's Top 5 athletics programs.

The Virginia Cavaliers men's basketball team is the intercollegiate men's basketball program representing the University of Virginia. The school competes in the Atlantic Coast Conference in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Virginia has won the NCAA Championship, two National Invitation Tournaments, and three ACC tournament titles. The team is coached by Tony Bennett and plays home games at the on-campus John Paul Jones Arena (14,623) which opened in 2006. They have been called the Cavaliers since 1923, predating the Cleveland Cavaliers of the NBA by half a century.

Craig Littlepage is an American college athletics administrator and former basketball player and coach. He is the former athletic director at the University of Virginia. He was named to that position in 2001 and has been with the school as an administrator since 1990. Littlepage served as the head men's basketball coach at the University of Pennsylvania from 1982 to 1985 and at Rutgers University from 1985 to 1988.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Virginia–Virginia Tech rivalry</span> American college sports rivalry

The Virginia–Virginia Tech rivalry is an American college rivalry that exists between the Virginia Cavaliers sports teams of the University of Virginia and the Virginia Tech Hokies sports teams of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Cavaliers and Hokies had a program-wide rivalry first called the Commonwealth Challenge (2005–2007) which UVA swept 2–0 before ending the series in a show of sportsmanship following the Virginia Tech massacre. A second series called the Commonwealth Clash (2014–2019), under revised rules and sponsored by the state's Virginia 529 College Savings Plan, was again won by UVA, 3–2. A third series, also called the Clash (2021–Present) and sponsored by Smithfield Foods, emerged three years after the previous series was concluded and is currently led by VT, 1–0. The Cavaliers lead the rivalry series in the majority of sports.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2009–10 Indiana Hoosiers women's basketball team</span> Intercollegiate basketball season

The 2009–10 Indiana Hoosiers women's basketball team represents Indiana University in the 2009–10 NCAA Division I basketball season. The Hoosiers were coached by Felisha Legette-Jack. The Hoosiers are a member of the Big Ten Conference.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Maggie Dixon Award</span> Award for outstanding NCAA Division 1 womens basketball coach in their first year as head coach

The Maggie Dixon Division I Rookie Coach of the Year Award is an award given annually since 2007 to the head coach in women's college basketball in the NCAA Division I competition who achieves great success in their first year as a Division I head coach. Given by the Women's Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA), the award is named for former women's head coach Maggie Dixon, who coached at Army for the 2005–06 season before suddenly dying due to valve complications from an enlarged heart. Dixon had been named head coach just 11 days before the start of the season but led the Black Knights to a 20–11 record and won the Patriot League tournament championship. It was Army's first basketball team, men or women, to play in the NCAA Tournament. Although Army would lose in the first round to Tennessee, Dixon was named the Patriot League Coach of the Year and received much praise from the college basketball community for her coaching job in just her first season. On April 6, 2006, Dixon died at the age of 28 to what her brother Jamie Dixon, then head men's basketball coach at Pittsburgh, described as an "arrhythmic episode to her heart."

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Virginia–Wise Cavaliers</span> University of Virginias-Wise sports teams

The Virginia–Wise Cavaliers, nicknamed the "Highland Cavaliers" before 2017, are the athletic teams that represent the University of Virginia's College at Wise, located in Wise, Virginia, in intercollegiate sports as a member of the NCAA Division II ranks, primarily competing in the South Atlantic Conference (SAC) since the 2019–20 academic year. The Cavaliers previously competed in the D-II Mountain East Conference (MEC) from 2013–14 to 2018–19.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2018 UMBC vs. Virginia men's basketball game</span> Upset during NCAA March Madness in 2018

On March 16, 2018, during the first round of the 2018 NCAA Division I men's basketball tournament, the University of Virginia Cavaliers played a college basketball game against the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) Retrievers at the Spectrum Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Cavaliers, who were seeded first in the South regional bracket and first overall in the NCAA Tournament, faced the Retrievers, who were seeded 16th in the South regional bracket. Virginia and UMBC competed for the right to face ninth-seeded Kansas State, which had already won their first-round game against Creighton earlier in the day.

The 1975 Virginia Cavaliers football team represented the University of Virginia during the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. The Cavaliers were led by second-year head coach Sonny Randle and played their home games at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Virginia. They competed as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, finishing in last. After a 1–10 campaign with many blowout losses, Randle was fired as head coach.

Amaka Agugua-Hamilton is the current head coach of the Virginia Cavaliers women's basketball team.

The 2021–22 Virginia Cavaliers men's basketball team represented the University of Virginia during the 2021–22 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The team was led by head coach Tony Bennett in his 13th year and played their home games at John Paul Jones Arena in Charlottesville, Virginia, as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2020–21 Missouri State Lady Bears basketball team</span> Womens college basketball season

The 2020–21 Missouri State Lady Bears basketball team represented Missouri State University during the 2020–21 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Lady Bears, led by second year head coach Amaka Agugua-Hamilton, played their home games at JQH Arena and were members of the Missouri Valley Conference.

The 2021–22 Virginia Cavaliers women's basketball team represented the University of Virginia during the 2021–22 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Cavaliers were led by fourth year head coach Tina Thompson, and played their home games at John Paul Jones Arena as members the Atlantic Coast Conference.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">2021–22 Missouri State Lady Bears basketball team</span> Womens college basketball season

The 2021–22 Missouri State Lady Bears basketball team represented Missouri State University during the 2021–22 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Lady Bears, led by third year head coach Amaka Agugua-Hamilton, played their home games at JQH Arena and were members of the Missouri Valley Conference.

The 2022–23 Atlantic Coast Conference women's basketball season began with practices in October 2022, followed by the start of the 2022–23 NCAA Division I women's basketball season in November. Conference play started in November 2022 and will conclude on February 26, 2023. After the regular season, the 2023 ACC Women's Basketball Tournament will be held at the Greensboro Coliseum in Greensboro, NC for the 23rd time in 24 years.

The 2022–23 Virginia Cavaliers women's basketball team represents the University of Virginia during the 2022–23 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Cavaliers are led by first-year head coach Amaka Agugua-Hamilton, and play their home games at John Paul Jones Arena as members the Atlantic Coast Conference.

References

  1. "University of Virginia Cavalier Orange". July 15, 2019. Retrieved April 25, 2020.
  2. "University of Virginia Official Athletics Website – UVA Cavaliers Women's Basketball". VirginiaSports.com. Retrieved 2017-01-28.
  3. "Amaka Agugua-Hamilton Named Head Women's Basketball Coach". 21 March 2022.
  4. "Virginia 2016–17 Cavalier Basketball" (PDF). Grfx.cstv.com. Retrieved 2017-01-28.
  5. "University of Virginia Official Athletics Website – UVA Cavaliers Women's Basketball". VirginiaSports.com. Retrieved 2017-01-28.