Tennessee Lady Volunteers basketball

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Tennessee Lady Volunteers
Basketball current event.svg 2022–23 Tennessee Lady Volunteers basketball team
Tennessee Lady Volunteers logo.svg
UniversityUniversity of Tennessee
Athletic director Danny White
Head coach Kellie Harper (4th season)
Conference SEC
Location Knoxville, Tennessee
Arena Thompson–Boling Arena
(Capacity: 21,000)
Nickname Lady Vols
ColorsOrange and white [1]
   
Uniforms
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Home
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Away


NCAA tournament champions
1987, 1989, 1991, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2007, 2008
NCAA tournament runner-up
1984, 1995, 2000, 2003, 2004
NCAA tournament Final Four
1982, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008
NCAA tournament Elite Eight
1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016
NCAA tournament Sweet Sixteen
1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2022
NCAA tournament second round
1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2021, 2022
NCAA tournament appearances
1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021, 2022
AIAW tournament runner-up
1980, 1981
AIAW tournament Final Four
1977, 1979, 1980, 1981
AIAW tournament Elite Eight
1977, 1979, 1980, 1981
AIAW tournament Sweet Sixteen
1977, 1979, 1980, 1981
AIAW tournament appearances
1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981
Conference tournament champions
1980, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014
Conference regular season champions
1980, 1985, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2015

The Tennessee Lady Volunteers basketball team represents the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Tennessee in NCAA women's basketball competition. The team has been a contender for national titles for over thirty years, having made every NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Championship tournament since the NCAA began sanctioning women's sports in the 1981–82 season.

Contents

The team is frequently referred to as the Lady Vols; the formal "Volunteers" nickname is regularly shortened by many fans of both men's and women's teams to "Vols." The university considers either "Lady Volunteers" or "Lady Vols" acceptable.

The Lady Vols have won at least a share of the SEC regular season championship 17 times (with the most recent occurrence being in 2015), won 17 SEC tournament championships (with the most recent occurrence being in 2014), made 18 Final Four appearances (with the most recent occurrence being in 2008), and won 8 national championships (with the most recent being in 2008).

Overview

The Lady Vols were coached by Pat Summitt for over four decades. Under Summitt, the Lady Vols won numerous SEC titles, appeared in 18 NCAA Final Fours and 4 AIAW Final Fours, and won 8 NCAA titles including an undefeated season. Additionally, Tennessee is the only team to have appeared in all 36 NCAA Tournaments, including 34 Sweet 16s (23 of which were consecutive). [2] Summitt's teams were known for participating in a grueling regular season schedule, often toughest in the nation, in order to prepare the team for the NCAA tournament. This tough schedule has caused Tennessee to build up rivalries with many prominent teams, including Texas, Stanford, Louisiana Tech, Old Dominion, and, most notably, Connecticut. [3] Like other Tennessee teams, the Lady Vols compete in the SEC, which is historically a competitive conference producing several NCAA Championship teams this century. Within the conference, Tennessee's main rivals are LSU, Vanderbilt, Kentucky and Georgia, with the series vs. South Carolina and Mississippi State gaining importance due to the emergence of those schools as national powers. Summitt led Tennessee to 1098 victories, with an 84.2% win rate. The numbers at home are even stronger, as Tennessee has won 91% of home games and 93.1% of in-conference home games. [2]

Current roster

2022–23 Tennessee Lady Volunteers women's basketball team
PlayersCoaches
Pos.#NameHeightYearPrevious schoolHometown
G 0Brooklynn Miles5 ft 4 in(1.63 m)So Franklin County HS Frankfort, KY
G/F 1Sara Puckett6 ft 2 in(1.88 m)So Muscle Shoals HS Muscle Shoals, AL
F 2Rickea Jackson6 ft 2 in(1.88 m)Sr Mississippi State University Detroit, MI
G 4Jordan Walker5 ft 8 in(1.73 m)RS Sr Western Michigan University Muskegon, MI
G 5Kaiya Wynn6 ft 0 in(1.83 m)So Foster HS Richmond, TX
G 10Jessie Rennie5 ft 6 in(1.68 m)Sr Bendigo Senior Secondary College Bendigo, AUS
F 11Karoline Striplin6 ft 3 in(1.91 m)So Geneva HS Hartford, AL
G 12Edie Darby5 ft 7 in(1.7 m)FrGreenfield HS Greenfield, TN
G/F 13Justine Pissott6 ft 4 in(1.93 m)Fr Red Bank Catholic HS Toms River, NJ
F 14Jasmine Franklin6 ft 1 in(1.85 m)Sr Missouri State University Fayetteville, AR
G 15Jasmine Powell5 ft 6 in(1.68 m)Sr University of Minnesota Detroit, MI
C 20Tamari Key6 ft 5 in(1.96 m)Sr Cary HS Cary, NC
G/F 21Tess Darby6 ft 1 in(1.85 m)JrGreenfield HS Greenfield, TN
G 25Jordan Horston6 ft 2 in(1.88 m)SrColumbus Africentric Early College Columbus, OH
G/F 33Marta Suárez6 ft 2 in(1.88 m)RS SoJoaquim Blume Institute Oviedo, Spain
F 53Jillian Hollingshead6 ft 5 in(1.96 m)So University of Georgia Gainesville, GA
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (S) Suspended
  • (I) Ineligible
  • (W) Walk-on

Roster

History

Early years

Lady Vols basketball began at the beginning of the 20th century. However, most "seasons" consisted of three or four games. The sport was dropped in 1926 and was not picked up again until 1960. [4] Coach Joan Cronan went 8–10 over two seasons before being replaced by Margaret Hutson, who coached for four years with a 60–18 record.

In 1974, Pat Head was named the new coach. Head had previously played women's basketball for the UT-Martin Pacers (now known as the Skyhawks), and had just graduated.

Late 1970s

In the 1974–1975 season, Pat Head took over a 25–2 Lady Vols team. In her opening season, the Lady Vols won the TCWSF Eastern District Championship for the third straight year. However, the team finished only 4th overall in the TCWSF (they had been 2nd the previous two years), and were not invited to the AIAW women's basketball tournament. After finishing 16–11 her second season, Head directed two 20-win teams, winning back-to-back AIAW Region-II championships. 1978 included the Lady Vols defeating 3-time AIAW champion Delta State by 20, and Tennessee's first number one ranking. [5] 1978 saw the Lady Vols participate in their first AIAW Final Four, where they finished 3rd. Head also recorded her 100th win during this season, a 79–66 victory over NC State. [6] Tennessee finished up the 1970s by winning the first ever SEC tournament, and returning to the Final Four, where they finished runner-up to Old Dominion, 68–53. [7]

1980s

During the 1980–1981 season, the Lady Vols went 25–6, and avenged their championship game loss to Old Dominion by defeating them three times. The team made it to the AIAW Final Four for the third straight year, but wound up as runner-up for the second consecutive year, losing to Louisiana Tech, 79–59. The coach was now known as Pat Summitt, having married Ross Barnes Summitt II in 1980.

The 1981–1982 season featured the first ever NCAA Women's basketball tournament. The Lady Vols were one of 32 teams invited and named a 2 seed in their region. In the region championship, the Lady Vols upset first seeded USC 91–90 in overtime to advance to the Final Four. They would lose their Final Four match-up with Louisiana Tech who ended up winning the tournament.

The next season, the Lady Vols won the regular season SEC title, but fell in the SEC tournament to Georgia. Tennessee was invited to the now-36 team NCAA tournament and was given their first ever 1 seed. Tennessee made it to the regional championship, but fell to Georgia again, 67–63. Summitt won her 200th game on December 3, a 69–56 victory over St. John's during the Coca-Cola Classic in Detroit. [6]

The 1983–1984 season saw Tennessee start out poorly, 6–4. However, Summitt got her team together and finished 22–10, for her 8th straight 20-win season, a streak that is still on-going. Tennessee not only made it to the NCAA Final Four for the second time out of the three tournaments, but also made it to the title game. However, Tennessee lost by 11 to USC, who had also won the title the previous year. Pat Summitt earned Coach of the Year honors. [2] This season was followed up by another 20-win year in which Tennessee earned both the regular season SEC title (despite only going 4–4) and the tournament title. However, the Lady Vols fell in the NCAA tournament to Mississippi during the Round of 16. The next season was a similar story—the Lady Vols had a decent regular season, played a great tournament (reaching the Final Four for the second time in three years), but fell before winning the title.

In 1986–1987, after years of trying, the Lady Vols finally broke through and defeated perennial power Louisiana Tech for their first title, 67–44. The Lady Techsters had defeated the Lady Vols by 12 earlier in the season. Tennessee's Tonya Edwards earned the honor of Most Outstanding Player in the Final Four. During this season, Summitt also earned her 300th win, an 87–66 victory over North Carolina. [6] The next year, the Lady Vols were poised to repeat, as the third-ranked and top seeded Tennessee made it to the Final Four yet again. However, Louisiana Tech avenged their championship loss with a nine-point win, and went on to win the title.

In 1988–1989, the Lady Vols made it to the Final Four for the fourth straight year, and as a one-seed for the second straight year. After dispatching Maryland by 12, Tennessee faced SEC rival Auburn for the title. Auburn had lost by two to Louisiana Tech in the title game the previous year, and had been given its only loss in the SEC Championship. However, that loss was to Tennessee, who managed a 15-point victory over the Tigers. The championship game was similar, and Tennessee took home its second title in three years with a 76–60 victory. Record-wise, this was Tennessee's best season yet, as they won 35 games while dropping only 2, one to Auburn in the regular season and the other a two-point loss to Texas. Additionally, the Lady Vols won every NCAA tournament game by at least twelve points. [7]

In the final season of the decade, the Lady Vols started off the season well, winning the SEC title. However, the team fell by one to Auburn in the SEC Championship, and then lost in overtime to Virginia in the regional finals, one game shy of making a trip to the Final Four, which was being held in Knoxville. Summitt did accomplish another milestone during this season, however—her 400th win, a 70–69 victory over South Carolina on January 25. [6]

1990s

Despite winning neither the SEC regular season championship nor the tournament championship, Tennessee was given a 1 seed in the 1991 NCAA tournament. After a close win in the regional semifinals against Western Kentucky, Tennessee dispatched Auburn for the second time in three years. In the national semifinals, the Lady Vols beat Stanford, 68–60, to earn the opportunity to avenge the previous year's tournament loss against Virginia. Just as the prior year's game had gone into overtime, so did this one. Down one at the half, the Lady Vols managed to tie the game at 60 by the end of regulation. Tennessee escaped in overtime with a 70–67 win, and their third national title in five years. However, the next year the Lady Vols did not even make it to the regional championship, falling to the same Western Kentucky team they had beaten in the same round the previous tournament, 75–70. The 1992–93 season was better, as Tennessee defeated the defending champions Stanford twice, and swept the SEC season for the first time ever. However, the Lady Vols were unable to win the tournament title, and also fell in the NCAA tournament to Iowa, a 72–56 loss in the regional finals.

Early in the 1993–1994 season, Summitt grabbed her 500th win, an 80–45 beating of Ohio State on November 21. Tennessee also won both the regular season and tournament conference titles. However, the streak of years without a Final Four appearance extended to three with a 71–68 loss in the regional semifinals to Louisiana Tech. The next season would be Tennessee's return to the Final Four. Tennessee ran the table in the SEC regular season for the third straight year, but also failed to win the tournament title for the third straight year. The top-seed Lady Vols breezed their way to their fifth national championship game, with no game being closer than 21. However, in the National Championship, the Lady Vols fell to the undefeated UConn Huskies, 70–64. During the off-season, Pat Summitt signed high school standout Chamique Holdsclaw.

In 1995–1996, with freshman Holdsclaw and senior Michelle M. Marciniak, the Lady Vols won the SEC tournament and made a second straight Final Four. The other three teams: UConn, Stanford, and Georgia, had all defeated the Lady Vols in the regular season. In the semi-finals, facing the UConn Huskies who had knocked them off for the title the previous year, the Lady Vols shot out to an 11-point lead. However, UConn cut it to 4 by the half, and tied later on. With 12 seconds to go, Tennessee led by three, but the Huskies hit a three to send the game into overtime. This was not enough though, as UT prevailed by 5 in overtime. The championship game was not that close as Tennessee won their fourth title easily, an 83–65 win over Georgia. [8]

With regard to record, the 1996–1997 season was one of Summitt's worst seasons ever. In addition to losses to powerhouses such as Louisiana Tech (twice), Stanford, Old Dominion, and Connecticut, Tennessee also lost to teams such as Florida, against whom they had been previously undefeated. After their tenth loss of the season, in the SEC semi-finals to Auburn, the team pulled together in time for the NCAA tournament. Avenging their loss to undefeated Connecticut, Tennessee continued on their way to the championship game, where they redressed another loss, defeating Old Dominion by 9 for their second straight national title. [9] Summitt also earned her 600th win during the season, a 15-point victory over Marquette on November 23, 1996. [6]

In many aspects, the 1997–1998 team was Summitt's best. With the top-ranked recruiting class as well as Holdsclaw, the Lady Vols ran the table to a 39–0 season while playing one of the top-ranked schedules in the country. Only three teams came within 10 points of beating them, and the Lady Vols won a 93–75 victory over Louisiana Tech for their third straight national championship.

Chamique Holdsclaw had declared that the 1998–99 team would be the greatest ever. However, this proved not to be the case. Injuries to several players decimated the team, and the Lady Vols ultimately fell to Duke in the regional finals. With this, the Chamique Holdsclaw era ended. A landmark was set during this season however, as "The Meeks"—Holdsclaw, Tamika Catchings, and Semeka Randall—became the first trio from one team to be named Kodak All-Americans. [7]

The Lady Vols ended the decade with their third straight 30-win season, third straight SEC title, and third straight SEC Tournament title. Additionally, the Lady Vols defeated UConn in the regular season, 72–71, in what would ultimately be the Huskies' only loss of the year. In the NCAA tournament, Tennessee breezed its way to the title game, winning all 5 games by at least ten points. However, in the championship the Lady Vols fell to the Huskies, by a 71–52 score. During the season, Summitt earned her 700th win, 85–62 at Wisconsin. [7]

At the 2000 ESPY Awards, the Lady Vols basketball team was named co-team of the decade, along with the Florida State Seminoles football team. [10] Additionally, Pat Summitt was named the Naismith Coach of the Century, and Chamique Holdsclaw earned recognition as player of the century. [7]

2000s

In the 2000–2001 season, the Lady Vols claimed another SEC title, winning all 14 SEC games. Additionally, they split the season series with the UConn Huskies and headed into the SEC tournament with a 28–1 record. However, the Lady Vols were upset by Vanderbilt in the semifinals, and then lost in the Sweet Sixteen to Xavier, their worst finish since 1993–1994. Despite this, Pat Summitt earned her 750th win, in the second game against UConn, a 92–88 victory. [6] Additionally, the team finished with their fourth straight 30-win season.

The 2001–2002 season marked the first time since the beginning of the rivalry that Tennessee and Connecticut played each other only once in the regular season. UConn won this match-up by 14. However they would see each other later in the tournament. Tennessee suffered other losses during the season, losing to Texas by a point and getting badly beaten by the Duke Blue Devils. Additionally, despite winning their fifth straight SEC championship, the Lady Vols fell once again in the tournament, this time to LSU. In the NCAA tournament, Tennessee was able to reach the Final Four yet again, with a 5-point win over Vanderbilt. This trip to the Final Four marked Summitt's 13th appearance, which broke Coach John Wooden's record of 12, as well as her 788th win, which tied her with Jody Conradt for winningest coach in women's basketball history. [6] However, the Lady Vols fell in the national semifinals to Connecticut. This loss ended the season at 29–5, one win shy of extending Summitt's streak of 30-win seasons. Summitt did achieve more milestones during this season. A 106–66 win over USC marked her 200th win at home, a victory against Louisiana Tech was her 300th win against a ranked opponent and her 93–65 win over Arkansas was her 1,000th game as a coach, including international contests. [6]

During the 2002–2003 season, the Lady Vols compiled their 6th perfect SEC season, and additionally beat powerhouses Duke and Louisiana Tech among others. However, the Lady Vols dropped their second straight to Texas and lost yet another game in the series against UConn. This streak would continue as the Lady Vols made it to the title game only to lose to the Huskies again, 73–68. [11] During the season, Summitt earned her 800th win, 76–57 over DePaul, and was the fastest coach to reach this milestone. [6]

The 2003–2004 season was quite similar to the previous year. The Lady Vols defeated most of their opponents, including Duke and Louisiana Tech, but dropped games to UConn and Texas. The Lady Vols again went 14–0 in the regular season against SEC competition and again fell in the tournament. And once again, the Lady Vols won five games in the NCAA tournament only to lose in the championship game to Connecticut. [12]

By 2004–2005, Connecticut's Diana Taurasi had finally graduated and Tennessee was able to break their losing streak against Connecticut with a 68–67 victory. As Taurasi left, Tennessee received Candace Parker, a highly regarded and nationally known player. However, due to injuries, she was redshirted and did not play that year. Tennessee suffered losses during the season to Duke, Rutgers, and LSU, while beating teams which included Stanford and Louisiana Tech. LSU's win over Tennessee gave the Tigers the SEC title, breaking Tennessee's streak of 7 straight. However Tennessee was able to break their streak of four years without a tournament title, by avenging their loss with a 67–65 victory over LSU in the SEC Championship. In the NCAA tournament, Tennessee defeated the Rutgers team which had beaten them earlier in the year to advance to their fourth Final Four in a row. In the Final Four, the Lady Vols fell to Michigan State by a mark of 68–64. [13] Tennessee had led by 16 at one point, but the Spartans made a record-tying come back to advance to the title game. [14] In the second round of the NCAA tournament, the Lady Vols defeated Purdue. This victory gave Pat Summitt her 880th win, breaking North Carolina coach Dean Smith's record of 879 wins, making her the all-time winningest coach in NCAA history.

2005–2006 was Candace Parker's first year as a college athlete. After being redshirted the previous year she was recovered from her injuries and became a starter. During the season, the Lady Vols dropped three games to SEC foes LSU, Florida, and Kentucky, their worst SEC season since the 1996–1997 season. The Lady Vols also suffered a bad loss to Duke. However they won their second straight game against Connecticut and rebounded from the poor SEC season to win the tournament for the second year in a row. In the tournament, Tennessee controversially received a two seed instead of the one seed Summitt believed her team deserved, and in the regional finals played North Carolina. Parker tied Ivory Latta for leading scorer with 20 points, but it was not enough. Tennessee trailed from the beginning, falling behind by as many as 16. Late in the second half, the Lady Vols were able to cut the lead down to five, but ultimately fell, 75–63. [15] This loss meant that for the first time in five years Summitt would not be appearing in the Final Four.

Early in the 2006–2007 season, Tennessee defeated three ranked teams in a row, Stanford, Arizona State, and Middle Tennessee. After Tennessee lost to the North Carolina Tar Heels again, by 13, the Lady Vols defeated a strong Notre Dame team and defeated UConn for the third time in a row. In Knoxville, Summitt's team fell to top-ranked Duke, 74–70, in a game which Duke scored the first 19 points, with Tennessee not scoring for nearly the first six minutes. [16] Later, in Baton Rouge, the Lady Vols clinched the SEC title against LSU in a game where Candace Parker scored 27. [17] However, in the tournament semifinals, Tennessee fell to the Tigers. In that second game, Parker only scored 4 points. [18] In the NCAA tournament, Summitt's team easily made it to the Final Four, dispatching teams that included SEC foe Mississippi and 13-seeded Cinderella, Marist, winning each game by at least 14. In the Final Four, Tennessee again faced North Carolina. Despite shooting just 27%, [19] the team came back from a 12-point deficit with 8:18 remaining to win, 56–50. [20] In the championship game against Rutgers, Tennessee finally won its seventh title. Down by 11 at the half, Rutgers mounted a small comeback, taking the lead down to 7 with 13:33, only to have Shannon Bobbitt hit three three-pointers. Rutgers responded with a 7–0 run, cutting the lead down to 8, but Parker hit 6 free throws to ice the win for Tennessee. [21]

The players, coaches, and other staff of the 2007-2008 Lady Volunteers, winners of the 2008 national championship, are honored at the White House by President George W. Bush on June 24, 2008. 20080624-4 p062408cg-0012-513htenn.jpg
The players, coaches, and other staff of the 2007–2008 Lady Volunteers, winners of the 2008 national championship, are honored at the White House by President George W. Bush on June 24, 2008.

The 2007–08 season started off with the top-ranked Lady Vols going 3–0, including wins over 9th-ranked Oklahoma [22] and 22nd-ranked Texas. The win over Texas was Summitt's 950th. [23] After two more wins, #1 Tennessee knocked off fourth-ranked North Carolina, 83–79, in a rematch of a Final Four match-up last year, to advance to 6–0 on the season. [24] Tennessee won their next four games, then headed out to California for a match-up with 5th-ranked Stanford. Down 4 with less than 30 seconds remaining, the Lady Vols managed to tie the game up and send it to overtime, but still lost, 73–69. [25] The Lady Vols responded by winning their next seven games, giving them a 17–1 record going into a match-up with Duke. Candace Parker's 17 points and 12 rebounds, including a bucket with 22 seconds remaining, helped the Lady Vols defeat the Blue Devils for the first time in four years, 67–64. [26] After winning their next three games, all against SEC opponents, the Lady Vols met with a top-5 Rutgers squad who had just defeated top-ranked UConn. Down 5 with under 90 seconds remaining, the Lady Vols hit back-to-back threes pointers to regain the lead, but Rutgers' Carson responded with a jumper to give Rutgers a one-point lead. On the other end, Candace Parker missed a shot with time winding down. Tennessee's Nicky Anosike got the rebound and was fouled, sending her to the free throw line where she made both free throws to give Tennessee a one-point victory. However, the finish proved to be controversial, as replays revealed that the game clock had paused with 0.2 seconds remaining, giving Anosike enough time to be fouled. [27] In the following game, against LSU, Tennessee soared out to a 21–2 lead, but led only 33–30 at halftime. In the second half, the Lady Tigers took a quick lead, and never looked back, winning 78–62. [28] Tennessee won the remainder of its regular season games and finished second in the SEC, giving them a first-round bye in the conference tournament. The Lady Vols went on to win the SEC tournament, defeating LSU.(61–55)

Tennessee advanced to their 18th Final Four, defeating LSU by only one point to advance to a second consecutive NCAA tournament championship Game. The Lady Vols defeated the 2-seeded Stanford Cardinal 64–48 to take home their 8th National Championship.

In 2009 the team had a rebuilding season, due to the departure of the first pick in the 2008 WNBA Draft Candace Parker. They finished the season at 22–11 and entered the NCAA tournament with the lowest seeding in the program's history at #5. In the opening round of the tournament they played a 26–8 Ball State Cardinals team that was making their NCAA tourney debut. Ball State would go on to win the game 71–55 making history. The Lady Volunteers had never lost in the first two rounds of the tournament, going 42–0 through the years. Tennessee also became the first defending champ to lose its opening game in the women's tourney.

2010s

On April 18, 2012, Head Coach Pat Summitt (née Head, she had married Ross Barnes Summitt II in 1980) announced that she would be stepping down as coach but remain with the team as a head coach emeritus following her 38 years with the team and recent diagnosis of dementia. Assistant Coach Holly Warlick was announced to be moving up to fill the head coaching position for the Lady Vols Basketball team. The Lady Vols earned their 17th SEC tournament championship as they defeated Kentucky 71–70 on March 9, 2014. [29]

On March 27, 2019, Warlick was fired. [30] On April 9, Kellie Harper was hired as head coach. [31]

Head coaches

Prior to 1971, records are incomplete. [32]

Retired jerseys

Retired Basketball Jerseys

Holly
Warlick

22

Bridgette
Gordon

30

Daedra
Charles

32

Chamique
Holdsclaw

23

Tamika
Catchings

24

Candace
Parker

3

Player awards

National awards

Shekinna Stricklen – 2009
Tonya Edwards – 1987
Bridgette Gordon – 1989
Michelle M. Marciniak – 1996
Chamique Holdsclaw – 1997, 1998
Candace Parker – 2007, 2008
Chamique Holdsclaw – 1998, 1999
Tamika Catchings – 2000
Candace Parker – 2008
Daedra Charles – 1991
Candace Parker – 2007
Candace Parker – 2007, 2008
Chamique Holdsclaw – 1998, 1999
Tamika Catchings – 2000
Candace Parker – 2007, 2008
Kara Lawson – 2003

SEC Awards

Bridgette Gordon – 1989
Dena Head – 1992
Nikki McCray – 1994, 1995
Chamique Holdsclaw – 1998, 1999
Candace Parker – 2007
Shekinna Stricklen – 2011
Meighan Simmons – 2013

Prominent players

Following the Lady Vols' 7th championship during the 2006–2007 season, Sports Illustrated compiled a list of the 10 greatest Lady Vols basketball players of all time. In the order they were listed, they are: [33]

First team

Second team

Season–by–season results

Statistics overview
SeasonTeamOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
Tennessee Lady Volunteers (AIAW)(1974–1979)
Pat Head (1974–1980)
1974–75Tennessee 16–8
1975–76Tennessee 16–11
1976–77Tennessee 28–5 AIAW Final Four
1977–78Tennessee 27–4 AIAW First Round
1978–79Tennessee 30–9 AIAW Final Four
Tennessee Lady Volunteers (SEC)(1979–2012)
1979–80Tennessee 33–5 AIAW Runner-up
Pat Summitt (née Head) (1980–2012)
1980–81Tennessee 25–6 AIAW Runner-up
1981–82Tennessee 22–10 NCAA Final Four
1982–83Tennessee 25–87–11st (East) NCAA Elite Eight
1983–84Tennessee 23–107–1T–1st (East) NCAA Runner-up
1984–85Tennessee 22–104–4T–2nd (East) NCAA Sweet Sixteen
1985–86Tennessee 24–105–45th NCAA Final Four
1986–87Tennessee 28–66–3T–4th NCAA Champions
1987–88Tennessee 31–38–12nd NCAA Final Four
1988–89†Tennessee 35–28–12nd NCAA Champions
1989–90Tennessee 27–68–11st NCAA Elite Eight
1990–91Tennessee 30–56–33rd NCAA Champions
1991–92Tennessee 28–310–12nd NCAA Sweet Sixteen
1992–93Tennessee 29–311–01st NCAA Elite Eight
1993–94Tennessee 31–211–01st NCAA Sweet Sixteen
1994–95Tennessee 34–311–01st NCAA Runner-up
1995–96†Tennessee 32–49–22nd NCAA Champions
1996–97Tennessee 29–108–45th NCAA Champions
1997–98‡ Tennessee 39–014–01st NCAA Champions
1998–99Tennessee 31–313–11st NCAA Elite Eight
1999–00Tennessee 33–413–1T–1st NCAA Runner-up
2000–01Tennessee 31–314–01st NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2001–02Tennessee 29–513–11st NCAA Final Four
2002–03Tennessee 33–514–01st NCAA Runner-up
2003–04Tennessee 31–414–01st NCAA Runner-up
2004–05Tennessee 30–513–12nd NCAA Final Four
2005–06Tennessee 31–511–32nd NCAA Elite Eight
2006–07#Tennessee 34–314–01st NCAA Champions
2007–08†Tennessee 36–213–12nd NCAA Champions
2008–09Tennessee 22–119–55th NCAA First Round
2009–10Tennessee 32–315–11st NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2010–11Tennessee 34–316–01st NCAA Elite Eight
2011–12Tennessee 27–912–42nd NCAA Elite Eight
Holly Warlick (2012–2019)
2012–13Tennessee 27–814–21st NCAA Elite Eight
2013–14Tennessee 29–613–3T-2nd NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2014–15Tennessee 30–615–1T-1st NCAA Elite Eight
2015–16Tennessee 22–148–8T-7th NCAA Elite Eight
2016–17Tennessee 20–1210–65th NCAA Second Round
2017–18Tennessee 25–811–5T-4th NCAA Second Round
2018–19Tennessee 19–137–9T-8th NCAA First Round
Kellie Harper (2019–present)
2019–20Tennessee 21–1010–6T–3rdNo postseason - COVID-19
2020–21Tennessee 17–89–43rd NCAA Second Round
2021–22Tennessee 25–911–53rd NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2022–23Tennessee 17–68–0
Total:1327–316 (.808)

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Postseason results

NCAA Division I

YearSeedRoundOpponentResult
1982 #2First round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#7 Jackson State
#3 Memphis
#1 Southern Cal
#1 Louisiana Tech
W 72–56
W 78–63
W 91–90 (OT)
L 46–69
1983 #1First round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#8 South Carolina State
#4 Ole Miss
#2 Georgia
W 86–51
W 90–83 (3OT)
L 63–67
1984 #3First round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#6 Middle Tenn
#2 Alabama
#1 Georgia
#3 Cheyney State
#1 Southern Cal
W 70–53
W 65–58
W 73–61
W 80–71
L 61–72
1985 #3First round
Sweet Sixteen
#6 Virginia
#2 Ole Miss
W 65–55
L 60–63
1986 #4Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#5 Iowa
#1 Georgia
#2 LSU
#1 Southern Cal
W 73–68
W 85–82
W 67–65
L 59–83
1987 #2Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#7 Tennessee Tech
#3 Virginia
#1 Auburn
#1 Long Beach State
#1 Louisiana Tech
W 95–59
W 66–58
W 77–61
W 74–64
W 67–44
1988 #1Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#9 Wake Forest
#4 James Madison
#2 Virginia
#2 Louisiana Tech
W 94–66
W 72–52
W 84–76
L 59–68
1989 #1Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#9 La Salle
#4 Virginia
#2 Long Beach State
#1 Maryland
#1 Auburn
W 91–61
W 80–47
W 94–80
W 77–65
W 76–60
1990 #1Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#8 Old Dominion
#5 Clemson
#2 Virginia
W 87–68
W 80–62
L 75–79 (OT)
1991 #1Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#8 Missouri State
#4 Western Kentucky
#3 Auburn
#2 Stanford
#1 Virginia
W 55–47
W 68–61
W 69–65
W 68–60
W 70–67 (OT)
1992 #1Second round
Sweet Sixteen
#8 Rutgers
#4 Western Kentucky
W 97–56
L 70–75
1993 #1Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#8 Northwestern
#4 North Carolina
#2 Iowa
W 89–66
W 74–54
L 56–72
1994 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
#16 NC A&T
#9 Clemson
#4 Louisiana Tech
W 111–37
W 78–66
L 68–71
1995 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#16 Florida A&M
#9 Florida International
#4 Western Kentucky
#2 Texas Tech
#3 Georgia
#1 Connecticut
W 96–59
W 70–44
W 87–65
W 80–59
W 73–51
L 64–70
1996 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#16 Radford
#9 Ohio State
#4 Kansas
#3 Virginia
#1 Connecticut
#2 Georgia
W 97–56
W 97–65
W 92–71
W 52–46
W 88–83 (OT)
W 83–65
1997 #3First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#14 Grambling State
#6 Oregon
#2 Colorado
#1 Connecticut
#6 Notre Dame
#1 Old Dominion
W 91–54
W 76–59
W 75–67
W 91–81
W 80–66
W 68–59
1998 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#16 Liberty
#8 Western Kentucky
#5 Rutgers
#2 North Carolina
#9 Arkansas
#3 Louisiana Tech
W 102–58
W 82–62
W 92–60
W 76–70
W 86–58
W 93–75
1999 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#16 Appalachian State
#8 Boston College
#4 Virginia Tech
#3 Duke
W 113–54
W 89–62
W 68–52
L 63–69
2000 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#16 Furman
#8 Arizona
#4 Virginia
#3 Texas Tech
#2 Rutgers
#1 Connecticut
W 90–38
W 75–60
W 77–56
W 57–44
W 64–54
L 52–71
2001 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
#16 Austin Peay
#9 St. Mary's
#4 Xavier
W 90–38
W 92–75
L 65–80
2002 #2First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#15 Georgia State
#7 Notre Dame
#11 BYU
#1 Vanderbilt
#1 Connecticut
W 98–68
W 89–50
W 68–57
W 68–63
L 56–79
2003 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#16 Alabama State
#8 Virginia
#4 Penn State
#2 Villanova
#1 Duke
#1 Connecticut
W 95–43
W 81–51
W 86–58
W 73–49
W 66–56
L 68–73
2004 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#16 Colgate
#9 DePaul
#4 Baylor
#6 Stanford
#4 LSU
#2 Connecticut
W 77–54
W 79–59
W 71–69
W 62–60
W 52–50
L 61–70
2005 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#16 Western Carolina
#9 Purdue
#4 Texas Tech
#3 Rutgers
#1 Michigan State
W 94–43
W 75–54
W 75–59
W 59–49
L 64–68
2006 #2First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Army
#7 George Washington
#3 Rutgers
#1 North Carolina
W 102–54
W 66–53
W 76–69
L 63–75
2007 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#16 Drake
#8 Pittsburgh
#13 Marist
#7 Ole Miss
#1 North Carolina
#4 Rutgers
W 76–37
W 68–54
W 65–46
W 98–62
W 56–50
W 59–46
2008 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#16 Oral Roberts
#9 Purdue
#5 Notre Dame
#2 Texas A&M
#2 LSU
#2 Stanford
W 94–55
W 78–52
W 74–64
W 53–45
W 47–46
W 64–48
2009 #5First round#12 Ball StateL 55–71
2010 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
#16 Austin Peay
#8 Dayton
#4 Baylor
W 75–42
W 92–64
L 62–77
2011 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#16 Stetson
#8 Marquette
#4 Ohio State
#2 Notre Dame
W 99–34
W 79–70
W 85–75
L 59–73
2012 #2First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 UT Martin
#7 DePaul
#11 Kansas
#1 Baylor
W 72–49
W 63–48
W 84–73
L 58–77
2013 #2First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Oral Roberts
#10 Creighton
#6 Oklahoma
#5 Louisville
W 83–62
W 68–52
W 74–59
L 78–86
2014 #1First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
#16 Northwestern State
#8 St. John's
#4 Maryland
W 70–46
W 67–51
L 62–73
2015 #2First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Boise State
#10 Pittsburgh
#11 Gonzaga
#1 Maryland
W 72–61
W 77–67
W 73–69 (OT)
L 48–58
2016 #7First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#10 Green Bay
#2 Arizona State
#3 Ohio State
#4 Syracuse
W 59–53
W 75–64
W 78–62
L 67–89
2017 #5First round
Second round
#12 Dayton
#4 Louisville
W 66–57
L 64–75
2018 #3First round
Second round
#14 Liberty
#6 Oregon State
W 100–60
L 59–66
2019 #11First round#6 UCLAL 77–89
2021 #3First round
Second round
#14 Middle Tenn
#6 Michigan
W 87–62
L 55–70
2022 #4First round
Second round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Buffalo
#12 Belmont
#1 Louisville
W 80–67
W 70–67
L 64–76

National Championships

YearCoachOpponentScoreRecord
1987 Pat Summitt Louisiana Tech Lady Techsters 67–4428–6
1989 Pat Summitt Auburn Tigers 76–6035–2
1991 Pat Summitt Virginia Cavaliers 70–67 OT30–5
1996 Pat Summitt Georgia Bulldogs 83–6532–4
1997 Pat Summitt Old Dominion Monarchs 68–5929–10
1998 Pat Summitt Louisiana Tech Lady Techsters 93–7539–0
2007 Pat Summitt Rutgers Scarlet Knights 59–4634–3
2008 Pat Summitt Stanford Cardinal 64–4836–2
National Championships8

AIAW Division I

The Lady Volunteers made five appearances in the AIAW National Division I basketball tournament, with a combined record of 12–6.

YearRoundOpponentResult
1977 First round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Third-place game
Michigan State
Kansas State
Delta State
Immaculata
W, 76–62
W, 81–69
L, 58–62
W, 91–71
1978 First round
Consolation Round
Maryland
Valdosta State
L, 69–75
L, 80–83
1979 First round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
Third-place game
Rutgers
Fordham
Louisiana Tech
UCLA
W, 79–68
W, 76–54
L, 84–102
W, 104–86
1980 First round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship
Kansas State
Maryland
South Carolina
Old Dominion
W, 84–64
W, 93–76
W, 75–72
L, 53–68
1981 First round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship
Illinois State
Maryland
Old Dominion
Louisiana Tech
W, 78–63
W, 79–67
W, 68–65
L, 59–79

See also

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