Watson baronets

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Arms of Watson, Marquess of Rockingham: Argent, on a chevron azure between three martlets sable as many crescents or. The arms of the Watson baronets of Fulmer are differenced by a chevron engrailed azure Argent chevron azure three martlets sable crescents Or.svg
Arms of Watson, Marquess of Rockingham: Argent, on a chevron azure between three martlets sable as many crescents or. The arms of the Watson baronets of Fulmer are differenced by a chevron engrailed azure

There have been seven baronetcies created for persons with the surname Watson, one in the Baronetage of England, one in the Baronetage of Great Britain and five in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. One creation is extant as of 2016.

Contents

The Watson Baronetcy, of Rockingham Castle in the County of Northampton was created in the Baronetage of England on 23 June 1621. [2] For more information on this creation, see the Marquess of Rockingham.

Rockingham Castle Grade I listed historic house museum in the United Kingdom

Rockingham Castle is a former royal castle and hunting lodge in Rockingham Forest approximately two miles north from the town centre of Corby, Northamptonshire.

Marquess of Rockingham

Marquess of Rockingham, in the County of Northampton, was a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1746 for Thomas Watson-Wentworth, 1st Earl of Malton. The Watson family descended from Lewis Watson, Member of Parliament for Lincoln. He was created a Baronet, of Rockingham Castle in the County of Northampton, in the Baronetage of England in 1621. In 1645 he was further honoured when he was raised to the Peerage of England as Baron Rockingham. The third Baron served as Lord-Lieutenant of Kent. In 1714 he was created Baron Throwley, Viscount Sondes and Earl of Rockingham in the Peerage of Great Britain. His eldest son Edward Watson, Viscount Sondes, predeceased him and he was succeeded by his grandson, the second Earl. The second Earl was Lord-Lieutenant of Kent before his early death in 1745. He was childless and was succeeded by his younger brother, Thomas. He had previously represented Canterbury in Parliament. He died in 1746, whereupon the barony of Throwley, viscountcy and earldom became extinct.

The Watson Baronetcy, of Fulmer in the County of Buckingham, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 22 March 1760 for Charles Watson (1751–1844), [3] son of Admiral Sir Charles Watson (1714–1757). The monumental inscription above his grave in the Parish Church of St Andrew's West Wratting, Cambridgeshire, reads: To the memory of Sir Charles Watson, Bart. (whose remains are deposited in a vault beneath) Born at Bradfield, Berkshire, May 29th. O.S. or June 9th. N.S. 1751; died at Wratting Park, in this parish, August 26th. 1844. He was created a baronet by His Majesty George the second, March 22nd. 1760, at the early age of 8 years, on account of the eminent services of his father Admiral Watson, who died at Calcutta, August 16th. 1757, in the 44th. year of his age, whilst in command of His Majesty’s Naval Forces in the East Indies; and to whose memory a monument is erected in Westminster Abbey. Also to the memory of Juliana, wife of Sir Charles Watson, Bart., third daughter of Sir Joseph Copley, Bart., of Sprotborough Yorkshire, and Bake Cornwall; who died May 24th. 1834, aged 72 years, and whose remains are deposited in the Church of St Mary-le-bone, London. The 1st Baronet inherited via his mother the lordship of the Devon manor of Combe Martin, which he sold before 1810. [4] The title became extinct on the death of the fourth Baronet in 1904. Robert Godfrey Wolesley Bewicke-Copley, 5th Baron Cromwell, was the son of Selina Frances Bewicke-Copley, daughter of the third Baronet (see the Baron Cromwell).

Fulmer village in the United Kingdom

Fulmer is a village and civil parish in South Buckinghamshire district in Buckinghamshire, England. The village has along most of its northern border a narrow green buffer from Gerrards Cross and is heavily wooded. The village's name is derived from the Old English for "lake frequented by birds". It was recorded in manorial rolls in 1198 as Fugelmere.

Buckinghamshire County of England

Buckinghamshire, abbreviated Bucks, is a ceremonial county in South East England which borders Greater London to the south east, Berkshire to the south, Oxfordshire to the west, Northamptonshire to the north, Bedfordshire to the north east and Hertfordshire to the east.

Charles Watson (Royal Navy officer) Royal Navy admiral

Vice Admiral Charles Watson was an officer of the Royal Navy, who served briefly as colonial governor of Newfoundland, and died at Calcutta, India.

The Watson, later Kay Baronetcy, of East Sheen in the County of Surrey, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 5 December 1803. For more information on this creation, see Kay baronets.

East Sheen suburb of London in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames

East Sheen, also known as Sheen, is an affluent suburb of South London in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames.

Kay baronets

The Watson, later Kay Baronetcy, of East Sheen in the County of Surrey, was a title in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 5 December 1803 for the merchant and soldier Brook Watson, with remainder failing male issue of his own to his great-nephews William Kay and Brook Kay and the male issue of their bodies. Watson died unmarried and was succeeded according to the special remainder by his great-nephew William Kay, the third Baronet. The title became extinct on the death of the sixth Baronet in 1918.

The Watson Baronetcy, of Henrietta Street, Cavendish Square, in the parish of St Marylebone in the County of Middlesex, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 27 June 1866 for the physician Sir Thomas Watson, Bt. [5] He was President of the Royal College of Physicians and Physician-in-Ordinary to Queen Victoria.

Cavendish Square public square in the West End of London, England

Cavendish Square is a public square in the West End of London, very close to Oxford Circus, where the two main shopping thoroughfares of Oxford Street and Regent Street meet. It is located at the eastern end of Wigmore Street, which connects it to Portman Square, part of the Portman Estate, to its west. One side is faced by the rear of the flagship John Lewis shop.

Royal College of Physicians professional body of doctors of general medicine and its subspecialties in the UK

The Royal College of Physicians is a British professional body dedicated to improving the practice of medicine, chiefly through the accreditation of physicians by examination. Founded in 1518, it set the first international standard in the classification of diseases, and its library contains medical texts of great historical interest.

Queen Victoria British monarch who reigned 1837–1901

Victoria was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India.

The Watson Baronetcy, of Earnock in the parish of Hamilton in the County of Lanark, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 15 July 1895 for John Watson. [6] The fourth Baronet assumed by deed poll his Christian name of Inglefield as an additional surname in 1945. This surname was also borne by the fifth Baronet who died in 2007. The sixth Baronet, Sir Simon Watson, was a member of the Executive Committee of the Standing Council of the Baronetage. [7] The baronetcy became extinct on the death of the seventh baronet on 3 May 2016.

Earnock

This article is about the history of the Earnock area. For information on the current housing estate built in the Earnock area see Earnock Estate.

Hamilton, South Lanarkshire town in South Lanarkshire, Scotland

Hamilton is a town in South Lanarkshire, in the central Lowlands of Scotland. It serves as the main administrative centre of the South Lanarkshire council area. It sits 12 miles (19 km) south-east of Glasgow, 35 miles (56 km) south-west of Edinburgh and 74 miles (120 km) north of Carlisle. It is situated on the south bank of the River Clyde at its confluence with the Avon Water. Hamilton is the county town of the historic county of Lanarkshire.

A deed poll is a legal document binding only to a single person or several persons acting jointly to express an active intention. It is, strictly speaking, not a contract because it binds only one party and expresses an intention instead of a promise.

The Watson Baronetcy, of Sulhamstead in the parish of Sulhamstead Abbots in the County of Berkshire, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 11 July 1912 for William George Watson. [8] [9] The title became extinct on the death of the second Baronet in 1983.

The Watson Baronetcy, of Newport in the County of Monmouth, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 13 February 1918 for Thomas Edward Watson. [10] The title became extinct on the death of the third Baronet in 1959.

Watson baronets, of (1623)

Watson baronets, of Fulmer (1760)

Watson, later Kay baronets, of East Sheen (1803)

Watson baronets, of Henrietta Street (1866)

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Ronald Victor Watson (born 1966), eldest son of the 5th Baronet.

Watson baronets, of Earnock (1895)

Watson baronets, of Sulhamstead (1912)

Watson baronets, of Newport (1918)

Related Research Articles

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Pollock baronets

There have been five baronetcies created for people with the surname Pollock, one in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia and four in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. As of 2017 three of the creations are extant. These three creations derive from the same family to which the 1703 baronetcy was granted; the Pollock ancestor of Sir Frederick Pollock, 1st Baronet and Sir George Pollock, 1st Baronet married his cousin, daughter of Sir Robert Pollock, 2nd Baronet.

Lewis baronets

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Williams baronets

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Stewart baronets

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Bowman baronets

There have been two baronetcies created for persons with the surname Bowman, both in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom.

Cooper baronets

There have been nine baronetcies created for persons with the surname Cooper, one in the Baronetage of England, one in the Baronetage of Ireland and seven in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom.

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There have been five baronetcies created for persons with the surname Evans, one in the Baronetage of Ireland and four in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. All of the baronetcies are now extinct.

There have been six baronetcies created for persons with the surname King, one in the Baronetage of Ireland, one in the Baronetage of Great Britain and four in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. Three of the creations are extant as of 2007.

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References

Footnotes

  1. Burke's General & Heraldic Dictionary
  2. George Edward Cokayne Complete Baronetage Vol 1 1900
  3. "No. 9984". The London Gazette . 18 March 1760. p. 2.
  4. Risdon, Tristram, Survey of Devon, 1810 edition, p.431
  5. "No. 23128". The London Gazette . 19 June 1866. p. 3539.
  6. "No. 26644". The London Gazette . 16 July 1895. p. 4023.
  7. "Standing Council of the Baronetage".
  8. "No. 28637". The London Gazette . 20 August 1912. p. 6188.
  9. Somerfield, Ferelith (n.d.). Mission Accomplished: The Life and Times of Florence Nagle, 1894-1988 : the Woman who Took on Both the Jockey Club and the Kennel Club, and Won. Dog World Publications. p. 16. ISBN   978-0-9500418-9-6.Check date values in: |year=, |year= / |date= mismatch (help)
  10. "No. 30781". The London Gazette . 5 July 1918. p. 7940.