Wattie Davies

Last updated

Wharton Peers Davies
Personal information
Full nameWharton Peers Davies
Born10 November 1873 [1]
Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, Wales
Died5 June 1961 (aged 87)
Spen Valley district, England
Playing information
Height5 ft 5 in (165 cm)
Weight11 st 6 lb (73 kg; 160 lb)
Rugby union
Position Fullback
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≤1893–≥93 Cardiff Northern RFC
≤1896–96 Cardiff RFC
Total00000
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≤1893–≥93 Cardiff and District XV
Rugby league
Position Wing, Centre
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1896–12 Batley 44812245621288
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≤1897–≥03 Yorkshire ≥5
Source: [2]

Wharton "Wattie" Peers Davies (10 November 1873 – 5 June 1961 [3] ) was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1890s, 1900s and 1910s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Cardiff and District XV, and at club level for (the now defunct) Cardiff Northern RFC and Cardiff RFC, as a fullback, i.e. number 15, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Yorkshire, and at club level for Batley, as a three-quarter, i.e. wing, or centre. [2] Davies still holds Batley's career appearance, goal, and point records, [4] and is one of less than twenty-five Welshmen to have scored more than 1,000 points in their rugby league careers. [5]

Rugby union Team sport, code of rugby football

Rugby union, commonly known in most of the world simply as rugby, is a contact team sport which originated in England in the first half of the 19th century. One of the two codes of rugby football, it is based on running with the ball in hand. In its most common form, a game is between two teams of 15 players using an oval-shaped ball on a rectangular field with H-shaped goalposts at each end.

Rugby league team sport, code of rugby football

Rugby league football is a full-contact sport played by two teams of thirteen players on a rectangular field. One of the two codes of rugby, it originated in Northern England in 1895 as a split from the Rugby Football Union over the issue of payments to players. Its rules progressively changed with the aim of producing a faster, more entertaining game for spectators.

Cardiff RFC british rugby union football club based in Cardiff

Cardiff Rugby Football Club is a rugby union football club based in Cardiff, the capital city of Wales. The club was founded in 1876 and played their first few matches at Sophia Gardens, shortly after which relocating to Cardiff Arms Park where they have been based ever since.

Wattie Davies made his début for Batley against Huddersfield at Mount Pleasant, Batley on Saturday 10 October 1896.

Batley Bulldogs english rugby league club

The Batley Bulldogs are an English professional rugby league club in Batley, West Yorkshire, who play in the Championship. Batley were one of the original twenty-two rugby football clubs that formed the Northern Rugby Football Union in 1895. They were League Champions in 1924 and have won three Challenge Cups.

Huddersfield Giants Rugby league club in Huddersfield, England

The Huddersfield Giants are an English professional rugby league club from Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, the birthplace of rugby league, who play in the Super League competition. They play their home games at the John Smiths Stadium which is shared with Huddersfield Town F.C.. Huddersfield is also one of the original twenty-two rugby clubs that formed the Northern Rugby Football Union in 1895, making them one of the world's first rugby league teams. The club was founded in 1864 and is the world's oldest professional rugby league club. They have won 7 Championships and 6 Challenge Cups, but have not won a major trophy since 1962, some 53 years ago.

Mount Pleasant, Batley stadium

Mount Pleasant stadium is a rugby league stadium in Batley, West Yorkshire, England. It is the home of Batley Bulldogs.

Davies played right wing, i.e. number 2, and unusually missed two conversions in Batley's 10-3 victory over St. Helens in the final of the 1897 Challenge Cup at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 24 April 1897, in front of a crowd of 13,492, played right wing, and scored a conversions in Batley's 7-0 victory over Bradford F.C. in the final of the 1898 Challenge Cup at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 23 April 1898, in front of a crowd of 27,941, played right wing, and scored a try in the 6-0 victory over Warrington in the final of the 1901 Challenge Cup at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds, in front of a crowd of 29,563. [6] Davies represented Yorkshire while at Batley, and scored five conversions against Durham at Belle Vue, Wakefield during November 1903. [7] and played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 0-21 defeat by Huddersfield in the 1909–10 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1909–10 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 27 November 1909, in front of a crowd of 22,000.

St Helens R.F.C. rugby league club

St Helens R.F.C. is a professional rugby league club in St Helens, Merseyside who compete in the Super League, the top tier of competition for rugby league in Europe.

The 1897 Challenge Cup was the inaugural staging of the Northern Rugby Football Union's Challenge Cup and involved 52 clubs from across England from the 1896-97 Northern Rugby Football Union season. The tournament was played over six rounds in March and April 1897, culminating in the final which was won by Batley.

The Challenge Cup is a knockout rugby league cup competition organised by the Rugby Football League, held annually since 1896, with the exception of 1915–1919 and 1939–1940. It involves amateur, semi-professional and professional clubs.

Davies later worked as an insurance agent. [1] He died aged 87 in Spen Valley district, West Riding of Yorkshire1. [3]

Spen Valley was a parliamentary constituency in the valley of the River Spen in the West Riding of Yorkshire. It returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

West Riding of Yorkshire one of the historic subdivisions of Yorkshire, England

The West Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three historic subdivisions of Yorkshire, England. From 1889 to 1974 the administrative county, County of York, West Riding, was based closely on the historic boundaries. The lieutenancy at that time included the City of York and as such was named West Riding of the County of York and the County of the City of York.

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References

  1. 1 2 1939 England and Wales Register
  2. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  3. 1 2 "Death details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  4. Batley Bulldogs Club Records
  5. Robert Gate (1988). Gone North - Volume 2. ISBN   0-9511190-3-6
  6. Les Hoole (1998). The Rugby League Challenge Cup - An Illustrated History. ISBN   1859830943, ISBN   978-1859830949
  7. C. F. Shaw (7 November 1903). Black & White Illustrated Budget Page-171 - Yorkshire's Champion Goal Kicker. ISBN n/a