Wattle-class crane stores lighter

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RAN-IFR 2013 D3 189.JPG
Crane stores lighter Telopea on Sydney Harbour in October 2013
Class overview
Name:Wattle class
Builders: Cockatoo Island Dockyard
Operators:
Built: 1972
In service: 1972–current
Completed: 3
Active: 2
Retired: 1
General characteristics
Type: Crane stores lighter
Displacement: 147 tons
Length: 24.22 metres (79.5 ft)
Beam: 10 metres (33 ft)
Draft: 1.66 metres (5.4 ft)
Propulsion: 2 × Caterpillar D333C Diesels
Speed: 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph)
Range: 320 nautical miles (590 km; 370 mi) at 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph)
Endurance: 24 hours
Crew: 4
Notes: All data from [1]

The Wattle-class crane stores lighter is class of three Australian-built lighters which have supported the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) since 1972. The vessels were originally operated by the RAN, but were transferred to DMS Maritime after 1997.

Ship class group of ships of a similar design

A ship class is a group of ships of a similar design. This is distinct from a ship type, which might reflect a similarity of tonnage or intended use. For example, USS Carl Vinson is a nuclear aircraft carrier of the Nimitz class.

Lighter (barge) type of flat-bottomed barge

A lighter is a type of flat-bottomed barge used to transfer goods and passengers to and from moored ships. Lighters were traditionally unpowered and were moved and steered using long oars called "sweeps" and the motive power of water currents. They were operated by highly skilled workers called lightermen and were a characteristic sight in London's docks until about the 1960s, when technological changes made this form of lightering largely redundant. Unpowered lighters continue to be moved by powered tugs, however, and lighters may also now themselves be powered. The term is also used in the Lighter Aboard Ship (LASH) system.

Royal Australian Navy naval warfare branch of the Australian Defence Force

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) is the naval branch of the Australian Defence Force. Following the Federation of Australia in 1901, the ships and resources of the separate colonial navies were integrated into a national force, called the Commonwealth Naval Forces. Originally intended for local defence, the navy was granted the title of 'Royal Australian Navy' in 1911, and became increasingly responsible for defence of the region.

Contents

Design and construction

The design of the Wattle-class crane stores lighters was based on that of the Aircraft/Water Lighter AWL 304. The craft have a catamaran hull, a small bridge and a crane with a maximum capacity of 3 tons. As built, each of the lighters was able to carry up to 30 tons of cargo. [2]

Catamaran multi-hulled watercraft featuring two parallel hulls of equal size. It is a geometry-stabilized craft, deriving its stability from its wide beam, rather than from a ballasted keel as with a monohull sailboat

A catamaran is a multi-hulled watercraft featuring two parallel hulls of equal size. It is a geometry-stabilized craft, deriving its stability from its wide beam, rather than from a ballasted keel as with a monohull sailboat. Catamaran is from a Tamil word, kattumaram, which means "logs tied together".

The Wattle-class crane stores lighters were built at Cockatoo Island Dockyard in Sydney. The hulls and bridge sections were built separately in Cockatoo Island's boiler shop, and then joined together at the island's shipyard. [2] Construction of the first craft, CSL 01, began in March 1972 and work on CSL 02 and 03 commenced in May and July of that year respectively. [3]

Cockatoo Island Dockyard Australian dockyard

The Cockatoo Island Dockyard was a major dockyard in Sydney, Australia, based on Cockatoo Island. The dockyard was established in 1857 to maintain Royal Navy warships. It later built and repaired military and civilian ships, and played a key role in sustaining the Royal Australian Navy. The dockyard was closed in 1991, and its remnants are heritage listed as the Cockatoo Island Industrial Conservation Area.

Hull (watercraft) watertight body of a ship or boat

A hull is the watertight body of a ship or boat. The hull may open at the top, or it may be fully or partially covered with a deck. Atop the deck may be a deckhouse and other superstructures, such as a funnel, derrick, or mast. The line where the hull meets the water surface is called the waterline.

Bridge (nautical) room or platform from which a ship can be commanded

The bridge of a ship is the room or platform from which the ship can be commanded. When a ship is under way, the bridge is manned by an officer of the watch aided usually by an able seaman acting as lookout. During critical maneuvers the captain will be on the bridge, often supported by an officer of the watch, an able seaman on the wheel and sometimes a pilot, if required.

Service

All three Wattle-class craft entered service with the RAN in 1972; CSL 01 was accepted on 15 August, followed by CSL 02 on 25 September and CSL 03 on 31 October. [1] They were named Wattle, Boronia and Telopea respectively in 1983. [4]

While the Wattle-class craft were scheduled to be disposed of in 1997, they were transferred to DMS Maritime instead. Telopea was retired in 2011 according to Combat Fleets, 16th Edition. As of 2011, two remained in service, with Wattle being located at Darwin and the other two craft at Sydney. Their main role is to transport ammunition and other stores for the RAN, though they can also be used to control oil spills or tow other lighters. [1]

DMS Maritime Australian company

DMS Maritime, formerly Defence Maritime Services, is an Australian company providing port services to the Australian Defence Force and Australian Customs Service National Marine Unit. DMS was founded in 1997 and currently operates 8 oceangoing vessels and over 100 harbour craft and has around 350 staff. The services DMS is contracted to provide to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) include operating tug boats and lighters at RAN bases, training members of the RAN, and maintaining the RAN warships.

Darwin, Northern Territory City in the Northern Territory, Australia

Darwin is the capital city of the Northern Territory of Australia, situated on the Timor Sea. It is the largest city in the sparsely populated Northern Territory, with a population of 145,916. It is the smallest, wettest and most northerly of the Australian capital cities, and acts as the Top End's regional centre.

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References

Citations

  1. 1 2 3 Wertheim (2007), p. 29
  2. 1 2 Gillett (1988), p. 96
  3. Gillett (1988), p. 97
  4. Gillett (1988), pp. 96–97

Works consulted

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