Waverly Group

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Waverly Group
Stratigraphic range: Carboniferous
Type Group
Sub-units Bedford Shale
Berea Sandstone
Sunbury Shale
Cuyahoga Formation
Logan Formation
Maxville Limestone
Location
RegionFlag of Michigan.svg  Michigan
CountryFlag of the United States.svg  United States

The Waverly Group is a geologic group in Michigan. It preserves fossils dating back to the Carboniferous period.

Michigan State of the United States of America

Michigan is a state in the Great Lakes and Midwestern regions of the United States. The state's name, Michigan, originates from the Ojibwe word mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake". With a population of about 10 million, Michigan is the tenth most populous of the 50 United States, with the 11th most extensive total area, and is the largest state by total area east of the Mississippi River. Its capital is Lansing, and its largest city is Detroit. Metro Detroit is among the nation's most populous and largest metropolitan economies.

The Carboniferous is a geologic period and system that spans 60 million years from the end of the Devonian Period 358.9 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Permian Period, 298.9 Mya. The name Carboniferous means "coal-bearing" and derives from the Latin words carbō ("coal") and ferō, and was coined by geologists William Conybeare and William Phillips in 1822.

Contents

The groups consists of the following formations: [1]

Bedford Shale

The Bedford Shale is a shale geologic formation in the states of Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia in the United States.

Berea Sandstone

Berea Sandstone, also known as Berea Grit, is a sandstone formation in the U.S. states of Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Kentucky. It is named after Berea, Ohio. The sandstone has been used as a building stone and is a source of oil and gas.

The Sunbury Shale is a geologic formation in Michigan. It preserves fossils dating back to the Mississippian period.

Related Research Articles

The Fort Payne Formation, or Fort Payne Chert, is a geologic formation found in the southeastern region of the United States. It is a Mississippian Period cherty limestone, that overlies the Chattanooga Shale, and underlies the St. Louis Limestone. To the north, it grades into the siltstone Borden Formation. It preserves fossils dating back to the Carboniferous period.

Pottsville Formation

The Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation is a mapped bedrock unit in Pennsylvania, western Maryland, West Virginia, and Ohio. The formation is also recognized in Alabama. It is a major ridge-former in the Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians of the eastern United States. The Pottsville Formation is conspicuous at many sites along the Allegheny Front, the eastern escarpment of the Allegheny or Appalachian Plateau.

The Freda Sandstone is a geologic formation in Michigan. It dates back to the Proterozoic. Lithologically, the Freda Sandstone is a lithic, red-brown, cyclic sequence of sandstones, mudstones and shales.

The Saginaw Group is a geologic group in Michigan composed of sedimentary rock deposited during the Pennsylvanian Period (circa 323.2 million years ago to 298.9 million years ago. Saginaw group rocks include sandstone, shale, coal, and limestone of fresh water, brackish, and marine origin. Fossils dating back to the Penssylvanian Period can be found in Saginaw Group formations.

The Waverly Sandstone is a geologic formation in Michigan. It preserves fossils dating back to the Carboniferous period.

Hinton Formation

The Hinton Formation is a geologic formation in West Virginia. It preserves fossils dating back to the Carboniferous period. It is mainly made up of limestone, sandstone, and shale.

Cleveland Shale

The Cleveland Shale, also referred to as the Cleveland Member, is a shale geologic formation in the states of Kentucky and Ohio in the United States.

Chagrin Shale

The Chagrin Shale is a shale geologic formation in the states of Ohio and Pennsylvania in the United States that is approximately 365 million years old. The Chagrin Shale is a greyish shale that begins thin and deep underground in north-central Ohio. As it proceeds east, the formation thickens, rises to the surface, and contains greater amounts of siltstone.

Cuyahoga Formation geologic formation in Ohio

The Cuyahoga Formation is a geologic formation in Ohio. The age of the formation is difficult to determine, because of a lack of diagnostic fossils. Roughly, the formation dates from the Late Kinderhookian to the Middle Osagean. Eight members are recognized, among them the Orangeville Shale, Sharpsville Sandstone, and Meadville Shale.

The Harrodsburg Limestone is a geologic formation, a member of the Sanders Group of Indiana Limestone, of Mississippian age. It was named for Harrodsburg, Indiana in southern Monroe County, Indiana by T. C. Hopkins and C. E. Siebenthal. It is made up primarily of calcarenite and calcirudite. It also may include some beds of dolomite and shale.

The Moorefield Formation, or Moorefield Shale, is a geologic formation in northern Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma that dates to the Meramecian Series of the middle Mississippian. In Arkansas, this formation is generally recognized to have one member, the Ruddell Shale, in the upper Moorefield Formation.

The Bloyd Formation, or Bloyd Shale, is a geologic formation in Arkansas. It preserves fossils dating back to the Carboniferous period.

The Witts Springs Formation is a sandstone geologic formation in Arkansas with thin layers of limestone, shale, and siltstone. It preserves fossils dating back to the Carboniferous period.

The Stanton Formation is a geologic formation of limestone in Iowa. It preserves fossils dating back to the Carboniferous period. It is in the Upper Pennsylvanian series, forming the top of the Lansing Group.

Tunnel Mountain Formation

The Tunnel Mountain Formation is a geologic formation that is present on the western edge of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin in the Canadian Rockies of western Alberta. Named after Tunnel Mountain near Banff, it was deposited during the Early Pennsylvanian sub-period of the Carboniferous period.

The Marshall Sandstone is a geologic formation in Michigan. It preserves fossils dating back to the Mississippian period.

The Parma Sandstone is a geologic formation in Michigan. It preserves fossils dating back to the Carboniferous period.

References

  1. Collins 1979, p. E4–E5.

Bibliography