Wawalag

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In Australian Aboriginal mythology, the Wawalag were a pair of sisters who were daughters of Djanggawul. They lived in a whirlpool and were eaten by Yurlungur, who was later forced to regurgitate them. Their rebirth is used as a symbol in boy-to-man ceremonies.

In Yolngu mythology, the Djanggawul are three siblings, two female and one male, who created the landscape of Australia and covered it with flora. They came from the island of Baralku, and were eventually eaten by Galeru. The two female Djanggawul made the world's sacred talismans by breaking off pieces of their vulvas. They included Bunbulama, a rain goddess.

Whirlpool Body of rotating water produced by the meeting of opposing currents

A whirlpool is a body of rotating water produced by opposing currents or a current running into an obstacle. Small whirlpools form when a bath or a sink is draining. More powerful ones in seas or oceans may be termed maelstroms. Vortex is the proper term for a whirlpool that has a downdraft.

In Australian Aboriginal mythology, Yurlungur is a copper snake who was awakened from a deep sleep by the odor of a woman's menstrual blood. The woman and her sisters, the Wawalag, were eaten by Yurlungur, who was told at a later snake meeting to regurgitate the women. In Australian Aborigine ceremonies, the vomiting symbolizes boys entering manhood.


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