Wings Over Africa

Last updated

Wings Over Africa
Wings Over Africa.jpg
Directed by Ladislao Vajda
Written by Ákos Tolnay
Marjorie Deans
Reginald Long
Patrick Kirwan
Produced by John Stafford
Starring
Cinematography James Wilson
Edited by Julian Wintle
Music by Jack Beaver
Production
company
Distributed by RKO Pictures
Release date
23 September 1936
Running time
63 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Wings Over Africa is a 1936 British adventure film directed by Ladislao Vajda and starring Joan Gardner, Ian Colin, James Harcourt and James Carew. [1]

Contents

The film is a quota quickie produced for released by RKO. [2] It was shot at Shepperton Studios with sets designed by the art director Duncan Sutherland. The film score was created by composer Jack Beaver.

Plot

Explorer Tony Cooper and homesick trader Norton find a skeleton in the African jungle with a package intended to be delivered to Victor Wilkins in London. Cooper takes it there and it proves to be from Wilkins' brother - the skeleton was his - with a map showing where he left £100,000 in diamonds for Victor. Cooper agrees to accompany him to Africa and they hire pilots John Trevor and Carol Reed, who all agree to a cut of the profits. On arrival in Africa, they're challenged by three men - Redfern, Collins and Quincey - who claim to have the mineral rights to all gems found in the area, and by Norton, who also wants a share. But Norton is stabbed to death and Trevor fatally wounded: suspicion falls on Cooper, who's in love with Carol. Carol investigates and finds the weapon in the possession of Wilkins, who wanted the diamonds all for himself. He tries to flee in one of the planes but crashes and is killed.

Cast

Related Research Articles

All at Sea is a 1935 British comedy film directed by Anthony Kimmins and starring Googie Withers, Tyrell Davis and Rex Harrison. Its plot follows a young man who falls in love during a cruise, and takes up a false identity as a famous writer to impress her.

<i>Lord Edgware Dies</i> (film) 1934 British film

Lord Edgware Dies is a 1934 British mystery film directed by Henry Edwards and starring Austin Trevor, Jane Carr, and Richard Cooper. The film was based on the 1933 Agatha Christie novel Lord Edgware Dies.

The House of the Arrow is a 1930 British mystery film directed by Leslie S. Hiscott and starring Dennis Neilson-Terry, Benita Hume and Richard Cooper. It was based on the 1924 book The House of the Arrow, and its subsequent stage play adaptation by A.E.W. Mason, part of his Inspector Hanaud series. It was one of four film adaptations of the story. It was made at Twickenham Studios. A quota quickie, it was distributed by the American company Warner Brothers. A separate French-language version La Maison de la Fléche was also produced at Twickenham directed by Henri Fescourt.

The Crooked Lady is a 1932 British drama film directed by Leslie S. Hiscott and starring George Graves, Isobel Elsom, Ursula Jeans and Austin Trevor. A quota quickie, it was filmed at Twickenham Studios.

Return of a Stranger is a 1937 British drama film directed by Victor Hanbury and starring Griffith Jones, Rosalyn Boulter, Ellis Jeffries and Athole Stewart. The film was made at Shepperton Studios as a Quota quickie, and was distributed by RKO Pictures to meet the company's annual requirement under the Quota.

Guilt is a 1931 British romance film directed by Reginald Fogwell and starring James Carew, Anne Grey, Harold Huth and James Fenton. In the film, the wife of a playwright has an affair with an actor.

Menace is a 1934 British crime film directed by Adrian Brunel and starring Victor Varconi, Joan Maude and D. A. Clarke-Smith. The film was made at Shepperton Studios by the Sound City production company. It was also known by the alternative title When London Sleeps. An abridged 60-minute edit has been released on DVD under the title Without Warning.

Love's Option is a 1928 British silent adventure film directed by George Pearson and starring Dorothy Boyd, Patrick Aherne and James Carew. It was made at Cricklewood Studios based on the novel The Riddle by Douglas Newton. The film was distributed by Paramount Pictures' British subsidiary, enabling the company to meet its yearly quota set down by the British government. The film follows several rivals attempting to gain control of a valuable Spanish copper mine. It was known by the alternative title A Girl of Today.

Song of the Plough, later re-released with the alternative title Country Fair, is a 1933 British drama film directed by John Baxter and starring Stewart Rome, Rosalinde Fuller and Allan Jeayes. The screenplay concerns an English farmer who is saved from financial ruin when his dog wins at a sheepdog trials.

Key to Harmony is a 1935 British drama film directed by Norman Walker and starring Belle Chrystall, Fred Conyngham and Reginald Purdell. The film is a quota quickie made at British and Dominions Elstree Studios for release by Paramount Pictures. It was based on the novel Suburban Retreat by John B. Wilson. The film's art direction was by Hylton R. Oxley.

Whispering Tongues is a 1934 British crime film directed by George Pearson and starring Reginald Tate, Jane Welsh and Russell Thorndike. The screenplay concerns a son who seeks revenge by stealing valuables from the men who drove his father to suicide.

A Voice Said Goodnight is a 1932 British crime film directed by William C. McGann and starring Nora Swinburne, Jack Trevor and D. A. Clarke-Smith. It was made at Teddington Studios by Warner Brothers. A scene was also shot at nearby Teddington Lock.

The Man Without a Face is a 1935 British drama film directed by George King and starring Carol Coombe, Cyril Chosack and Moore Marriott. It was made as a quota quickie at Walton Studios.

School for Stars is a 1935 British romance film directed by Donovan Pedelty and starring Fred Conyngham, Jean Gillie and Torin Thatcher. It was made at British and Dominions Elstree Studios as a quota quickie.

The Way of Youth is a 1934 British crime film directed by Norman Walker and starring Irene Vanbrugh, Aileen Marson and Sebastian Shaw. It was made at British and Dominions Elstree Studios as a quota quickie.

Lucky Blaze is a 1933 British sports film directed by Widgey R. Newman and starring William Freshman, Vera Sherborne and Moore Marriott. It was made as a quota quickie.

Little Fella is a 1933 British comedy film directed by William C. McGann and starring John Stuart, Joan Marion and Hal Walters. It was made at Teddington Studios as a quota quickie.

My Lucky Star is a 1933 British comedy film directed by Louis Blattner and John Harlow and starring Florence Desmond, Oscar Asche and Harry Tate. It was made at Elstree Studios as a quota quickie. A young woman working in a shop poses as a film star.

The Right Age to Marry is a 1935 British comedy film directed by Maclean Rogers and starring Frank Pettingell, Joyce Bland and Tom Helmore. It was made at Walton Studios as a quota quickie.

<i>The Dark Light</i> (film) 1951 British film

The Dark Light is a 1951 British thriller film directed by Vernon Sewell and starring Albert Lieven, David Greene, Norman Macowan. It was filmed at a rented country estate in Gilston and on location around Portsmouth.

References

  1. BFI.org
  2. Chibnall p.292

Bibliography