2003 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

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The qualification process for the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup saw 99 teams from the six FIFA confederations compete for the 16 places in the tournament's finals. The places were divided as follows:

2003 FIFA Womens World Cup 2003 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fourth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in the United States and won by Germany. They won their first women's world title and became the first country to win both men's and women's World Cup. The men's team had won the World Cup three times at the time.

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is an organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and eFootball. FIFA is responsible for the organization of football's major international tournaments, notably the World Cup which commenced in 1930 and the Women's World Cup which commenced in 1991.

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Africa The second largest and second most-populous continent, mostly in the Northern and Eastern Hemispheres

Africa is the world's second largest and second most-populous continent, being behind Asia in both categories. At about 30.3 million km2 including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of Earth's total surface area and 20% of its land area. With 1.2 billion people as of 2016, it accounts for about 16% of the world's human population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, the Isthmus of Suez and the Red Sea to the northeast, the Indian Ocean to the southeast and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. The continent includes Madagascar and various archipelagos. It contains 54 fully recognised sovereign states (countries), nine territories and two de facto independent states with limited or no recognition. The majority of the continent and its countries are in the Northern Hemisphere, with a substantial portion and number of countries in the Southern Hemisphere.

Confederation of African Football governing body of association football in Africa

The Confederation of African Football or CAF is the administrative and controlling body for African association football.

Asia Earths largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres

Asia is Earth's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres. It shares the continental landmass of Eurasia with the continent of Europe and the continental landmass of Afro-Eurasia with both Europe and Africa. Asia covers an area of 44,579,000 square kilometres (17,212,000 sq mi), about 30% of Earth's total land area and 8.7% of the Earth's total surface area. The continent, which has long been home to the majority of the human population, was the site of many of the first civilizations. Asia is notable for not only its overall large size and population, but also dense and large settlements, as well as vast barely populated regions. Its 4.5 billion people constitute roughly 60% of the world's population.

Qualified teams

  • Africa (CAF)
  • Asia (AFC)
    North Korea womens national football team womens national football team representing North Korea

    The North Korea women's national football team represents North Korea in international women's football. North Korea won the AFC Women's Asian Cup in 2001, 2003, and 2008.

    China womens national football team womens national association football team representing the Peoples Republic of China

    The Chinese women's national football team, recognized as China PR by FIFA, is governed by the Chinese Football Association. The team is colloquially referred to as "Zhōngguó Nǚzú".

    South Korea womens national football team womens national association football team representing South Korea

    The South Korea women's national football team represents South Korea in international women's football competitions. The team is referred to as the Korea Republic by FIFA. Its first game was a match against Japan in 1990, which it lost 13–1. Since then, it has qualified for two FIFA World Cups, in 2003 and 2015.

  • South America (CONMEBOL)
  • Oceania (OFC)
Nigeria womens national football team womens national association football team representing Nigeria

The Nigeria national women's football team, nicknamed the Super Falcons, is the national team of Nigeria and is controlled by the Nigeria Football Federation. They won the first seven African championships and through their first twenty years lost only five games to African competition: December 12, 2002 to Ghana in Warri, June 3, 2007 at Algeria, August 12, 2007 to Ghana in an Olympic qualifier, November 25, 2008 at Equatorial Guinea in the semis of the 2008 Women's African Football Championship and May 2011 at Ghana in an All Africa Games qualification match.

Ghana womens national football team womens national association football team representing Ghana

The Ghana women's national football team is the national team of Ghana and is controlled by the Ghana Football Association. They are nicknamed the Black Queens.

Asian Football Confederation governing body of association football in Asia

The Asian Football Confederation (AFC) is the governing body of association football in Asia and Australia. It has 47 member countries, mostly located on the Asian and Australian continent, but excludes the transcontinental countries with territory in both Europe and Asia – Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Turkey – which are instead members of UEFA. Three other states located geographically along the western fringe of Asia – Cyprus, Armenia and Israel – are also UEFA members. On the other hand, Australia, formerly in the OFC, joined the Asian Football Confederation in 2006, and the Oceanian island of Guam, a territory of the United States, is also a member of AFC, in addition to Northern Mariana Islands, one of the Two Commonwealths of the United States. Hong Kong and Macau, although not independent countries, are also members of the AFC.

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

France womens national football team womens national association football team representing France

The French women's national football team is directed by the French Football Federation (FFF). The team competes as a member of UEFA in various international football tournaments such as the FIFA Women's World Cup, UEFA Women's Euro, the Summer Olympics, and the Algarve Cup.

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

Qualification groups

Africa (CAF)

Qualified:Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria -- Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana

The two African teams to qualify to the World Cup were the two finalists of the 2002 CAF Women's Championship, Nigeria and Ghana.

Asia (AFC)

Qualified:Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR -- Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea -- Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea -- Flag of Japan.svg  Japan

The first three places - China, Korea DPR and Korea Republic - were directly qualified. The fourth-placed Japan qualified in two playoff-matches against Mexico.

Europe (UEFA)

Qualified:Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden -- Flag of Russia.svg  Russia -- Flag of Germany.svg  Germany -- Flag of Norway.svg  Norway -- Flag of France.svg  France

The 16 teams belonging to Class A of European women's football were drawn into four groups, from which the group winners qualify for the World Cup. The four runners-up were played in playoff-matches for the 5th berth.

North, Central America & the Caribbean (CONCACAF)

Qualified:Flag of the United States.svg  United States -- Flag of Canada.svg  Canada

The 2002 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup second-placed Canada qualified for the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. The winner USA qualified as host. The third-placed Mexico played against Japan in two play-off matches for qualification.

Oceania (OFC)

Qualified:Flag of Australia.svg  Australia

The 2003 OFC Women's Championship determined the OFC's one qualifier for the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup — the winner Australia.

South America (CONMEBOL)

Qualified:Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil -- Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina

The fourth edition of the Sudamericano Femenino (Women's South American Championship) in 2003 determined the CONMEBOL's qualifiers Brazil and Argentina.

Play-offs

Mexico  Flag of Mexico.svg 2 2 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Mora 60'
Sandoval 76'
report (Japanese) Kobayashi 51'
Miyamoto 74'
Estadio Azteca, Mexico City
Attendance: 75,000
Referee: Toro Pardo (Colombia)

Japan  Flag of Japan.svg 2 0 Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Sawa 56'
Maruyama 83'
report (Japanese)
National Stadium, Tokyo
Attendance: 12,743
Referee: Elovirta (Finland)

Japan won 4-2 on aggregate and qualified for 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup.

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Oceania Football Confederation body for association football in Oceania

The Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) is one of the six continental confederations of international association football, consisting of New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, and other Pacific Island countries. It promotes the game in Oceania and allows the member nations to qualify for the FIFA World Cup.

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