2010 Women's Rugby World Cup

Last updated

2010 Women's Rugby World Cup
Tournament details
Host nationFlag of England.svg  England
DatesFriday 20 August 2010 – Sunday 5 September 2010
No. of nations12
Champions  Gold medal blank.svg Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand (4th title)
Tournament statistics
Matches played30
Top scorer(s) Flag of New Zealand.svg Kelly Brazier (48)
Most tries Flag of New Zealand.svg Carla Hohepa (7)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Heather Moyse (7)
2006
2014

The 2010 Women's Rugby World Cup was the sixth edition of the Women's Rugby World Cup and was held in England. [1] The International Rugby Board Executive Committee selected the host union following a recommendation from the Rugby World Cup Limited board after considering bids from the Rugby Football Union and the German Rugby Union – it had been England's third successive bid after being rejected in 2002 and 2006. The tournament was again being organised by the International Rugby Board (IRB) as opposed to the host union, and included five matches for all teams played on 20, 24, 28 August and 1 and 5 September. In May 2009 it was announced that the semi final, 3rd place play off and final would take place at The Stoop and not Twickenham as had previously been suggested. Pool games were held at the Surrey Sports Park in Guildford.

Contents

Interest in the tournament was far higher than had been anticipated. It was broadcast to 127 countries and all 2,500 seats at the opening two days of pool games were sold out, as was the third day despite the capacity being raised to 3,200. The semi-finals attracted over 6,000 spectators, while the final drew a crowd of 13,253 [2] – a world record for a women's rugby international – and well as a worldwide TV audience of (according to IRB figures [3] ) half a million.

The competition was won by New Zealand who beat England 13–10 in the final. [4]

Three tries from the tournament were shortlisted for the IRB's "Try of the Year" award. [5]

Qualification process

When the winning bid to host the World Cup was announced in September 2008, Bernard Lapasset (Rugby World Cup Limited Board Chairman) promised that:

"These two tournaments [the Sevens and XVs World Cups], in conjunction with a global qualification process and existing tournament structures, will guarantee an unprecedented level of elite Women's competition for around 90 Unions over the next two years. This expanded competition pathway underpinned by the Women's Strategic Plan point to what promises to be the most competitive Women's Rugby World Cup ever in 2010". [6]

However, when details of the qualification process were released in March 2009 it was revealed that most IRB members would not be given an opportunity to compete for a place. Qualification tournaments took place in two regions – Europe and Asia – while in Oceania two nations played off in a single game for one place. Elsewhere the IRB nominated the "qualifying" nation, all other nations in these regions were excluded. Even where qualification tournaments took place the majority of rugby playing countries did not take part.

No official explanation was given by the IRB, but at the time of the Oceania qualifier it was reported that the non-participation of some nations – including Fiji and Papua New Guinea – was due to financial difficulties.

The process was:

Europe: 6 representatives

Americas: 2 representatives

Africa: 1 representative

Asia: 1 representative

Semi-finals

[773]
4 November 2009 Singapore  Flag of Singapore.svg11–35 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Republic Polytechnic, Singapore[10/24/3]
[774]
4 November 2009 Hong Kong  Flag of Hong Kong.svg14–58 Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan Republic Polytechnic, Singapore[13/42/1]

Third place final

[775]
6 November 2009 Singapore  Flag of Singapore.svg3–16 Flag of Hong Kong.svg  Hong Kong Padang, Singapore [11/13/5]

Final

[776]
6 November 2009 Japan  Flag of Japan.svg5–43 Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan Padang, Singapore [25/43/4]

Oceania: 2 representatives

[760]
8 August 2009 Samoa  Flag of Samoa.svg0–87 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Samoa[14/27/1]

Nations

Pool A Pool B Pool C

Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales

Flag of England.svg  England
IRFU flag.svg  Ireland
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan
Flag of the United States.svg  United States

Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Flag of France.svg  France
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden

Tickets and sponsorship

Tickets had been available since 22 March 2010 and they could be purchased online at Ticketmaster or by phone, with an innovative ticketing structure based on some tournament passes and individual match day tickets. [8]
Thirteen matches were broadcast live through a platform provided by host broadcaster Sky Sports in 127 territories to a potential audience of 227 million homes, smashing the 2006 World Cup benchmark in Canada (75 territories and a potential reach of 97 million homes). The programming hours was increased from 60 in 2006 to 220 in this edition. [9]
The commercial partners of the tournament were Nike, Heineken, the Coca-Cola Company's sports drink Powerade, Holiday Inn, British rugby equipment supplier Rhino Rugby, University of Surrey and UK National Lottery.

Squads

Match officials

In December 2009, the IRB announced a panel of 14 match officials for the tournament, including seven world's leading female referees and three specialist assistant referees with previous Women's Rugby World Cup experience. [10]
England's Clare Daniels officiated the opening match between Canada and Scotland, while Australian Sarah Corrigan refereed the final between England and New Zealand. [11] [12]

Format

The competition was contested over 16 days and 30 matches between 12 nations, divided into three pools of four teams. The tournament began on 20 August at Surrey Sports Park with a match between Canada and Scotland and ended with the final held at Twickenham Stoop on 5 September between England and New Zealand.

Pool stage

Women's Rugby World Cup - Guildford 2010 Womens Rugby World Cup - Guildford 2010.jpg
Women's Rugby World Cup – Guildford 2010

Defending champions New Zealand, hosts and 2006 runners-up England and 2006 bronze winners France all ranked top seeds in their pool. [13] Teams played each other in each pool on a round robin basis, while match points were awarded according to the international standards: 4 points for a win, 2 points for a draw, 1 point for scoring 4 or more tries or for losing by 7 or less than 7 points.
At the end of the pool stage, the teams in a pool were ranked according to their cumulative match points. If two or more teams had been level, the following criteria would have been used in this order until one of the teams could be determined as the higher ranked:

Ranking finals

The teams were seeded based on the position in which they finished in their respective pools and the points scored during the pool stage. The three pool winners and the best runner-up went through to the semi-finals. The other two runners-up and the best two 3rd-place finishers went into a sort of a competition for 5th place, whilst the bottom three teams competed for 9th place.
The ranking finals were set as it follows:

Finals

If teams had been tied at full-time, the winner would have been determined through a 10-minutes extra time (the first team to score any points would have been declared the winner) or eventually a kicking competition (five players from each team would have kicked from three different points on the 22-metre line). [14]

World Cup tournament

Pool stage

Qualified for rankings 1–4 semi-finals
Qualified for rankings 5–8 semi-finals
Qualified for rankings 9–12 semi-finals

Pool A

PoNationPlWoDrLoPfPaPdTfTaBpTp
1Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 330012816+112222315
2Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 32019344+49148210
3Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 310218127−10931904
4Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 30033082−5241411
Test no. 835
20 August 2010
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg26–12Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Javier Mancuso (Argentina)
Tries: Nicole Beck 6'
Sharni Williams 16'
Cobie-Jane Morgan 23'
Tricia Brown 79'
Cons: Nicole Beck 6', 16', 23'
Report Tries: Penalty try 4'
Lowri Harries 70'
Con: Non Evans 4'
Test no. 837
20 August 2010
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg55–3Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Andrew McMenemy (Scotland)
Tries: Carla Hohepa 4', 17', 54'
Fiao'o Fa'amausili 7'
Kelly Brazier 12'
Huriana Manuel 22', 32'
Renee Wickliffe 44'
Casey Robertson 68'
Cons: Kelly Brazier 5', 8', 13', 23', 69'
Report Pen: Zandile Nojoko 65'
Test no. 841
24 August 2010
South Africa  Flag of South Africa.svg15–10Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Joyce Henry (Canada)
Tries: Namhla Siyolo 30'
Charmaine Kayser 40'
Zandile Nojoko 65'
Report Try: Ceri Redman 78'
Con: Non Evans 79'
Pen: Non Evans 71'
Test no. 844
24 August 2010
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg5–32Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Dana Teagarden (USA)
Try: Lindsay Morgan 48' Report Tries: Fiao'o Fa'amausili 14'
Carla Hohepa 20'
Justine Lavea 22', 29'
Victoria Blackledge 41'
Huriana Manuel 62'
Con: Rebecca Hull 21'
Test no. 848
28 August 2010
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg41–8Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Clare Daniels (England)
Tries: Kelly Brazier 6', 20', 45'
Rebecca Hull 23'
Victoria Grant 49'
Halie Hurring 51'
Cons: Rebecca Hull 24'
Kelly Brazier 50'
Kendra Cocksedge 70'
Report Try: Caryl James 38'
Pen: Non Evans 12'
Test no. 850
28 August 2010
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg62–0Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: David Keane (Ireland)
Tries: Kristy Giteau 5'
Tricia Brown 18'
Debby Hodgkinson 26'
Lindsay Morgan 29', 53'
Alexandra Hargreaves 43'
Sharni Williams 48', 80'
Cobie-Jane Morgan 62'
Cons: Nicole Beck 6', 19', 27', 30',
44', 49', 80'
Pen: Nicole Beck 15'
Report

Pool B

PoNationPlWoDrLoPfPaPdTfTaBpTp
1Flag of England.svg  England 330014610+136222315
2IRFU flag.svg  Ireland 32015942+17116210
3Flag of the United States.svg  United States 31027359+14111015
4Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 30033170−16702600
Test no. 836
20 August 2010
Kazakhstan  Flag of Kazakhstan.svg0–51Flag of the United States.svg  United States Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Nicky Inwood (New Zealand)
Report Tries: Nathalie Marchino 5', 73'
Christy Ringgenberg 44', 68'
Ashley Kmiecik 51'
Phaidra Knight 59'
Amy Daniels 70'
Cons: Christy Ringgenberg 6', 45', 52',
69', 74'
Pens: Christy Ringgenberg 4', 35'
Test no. 839
20 August 2010
England  Flag of England.svg27–0IRFU flag.svg  Ireland Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Sarah Corrigan (Australia)
Tries: Fiona Pocock 9'
Katherine Merchant 37'
Amy Turner 56'
Margaret Alphonsi 79'
Cons: Katy McLean 10', 80'
Pen: Katy McLean 75'
Report
Test no. 845
24 August 2010
Ireland  IRFU flag.svg22–12Flag of the United States.svg  United States Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Sébastien Minery (France)
Tries: Joy Neville 6', 45'
Niamh Briggs 35'
Tania Rosser 53'
Con: Niamh Briggs 54'
Report Tries: Jamie Burke 17'
Venesha McGee 73'
Con: Melissa Kanuk 18'
Test no. 846
24 August 2010
England  Flag of England.svg82–0Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Javier Mancuso (Argentina)
Tries: Fiona Pocock 4', 54', 63'
Charlotte Barras 10', 22', 79'
Sarah Beale 25'
Katherine Merchant 34'
Rachael Burford 38'
La Toya Mason 44'
Rosemarie Crowley 67'
Amber Penrith 74'
Cons: Katy McLean 5', 11', 22', 26',
35', 39', 45'
La Toya Mason 55', 64', 67', 75'
Report
Test no. 851
28 August 2010
Ireland  IRFU flag.svg37–3Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Andrew McMenemy (Scotland)
Tries: Niamh Briggs 2'
Joy Neville 16', 68'
Louise Beamish 24'
Orla Brennan 32'
Eliza Downey 42'
Kate O'Loughlin 63'
Con: Niamh Briggs 17'
Report Pen: Aigerym Daurembayeva 49'
Test no. 852
28 August 2010
England  Flag of England.svg37–10Flag of the United States.svg  United States Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Nicky Inwood (New Zealand)
Tries: Danielle Waterman 4', 38'
Katherine Merchant 30'
Emily Scarratt 51'
Amber Penrith 68'
Margaret Alphonsi 76'
Cons: Katy McLean 39', 77'
Pen: Katy McLean 9'
Report Tries: Nathalie Marchino 18'
Kim Magrini 24'

Pool C

PoNationPlWoDrLoPfPaPdTfTaBpTp
1Flag of France.svg  France 33005524+31102113
2Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 32018543+42127210
3Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 31024959−108915
4Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 30032487−6321411
Test no. 834
20 August 2010
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg37–10Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Clare Daniels (England)
Tries: Barbara Mervin 10'
Mandy Marchak 21', 41'
Maria Gallo 38'
Heather Moyse 51'
Cons: Anna Schnell 22', 39', 52'
Pens: Anna Schnell 7', 18'
Report Tries: Lucy Millard 49'
Lindsay Wheeler 64'
Test no. 838
20 August 2010
France  Flag of France.svg15–9Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Sherry Trumbull (Canada)
Tries: Sandra Rabier 8'
Claire Canal 31', 68'
Report Pens: Ulrika Anderson Hall 21', 27', 40'
Test no. 842
24 August 2010
France  Flag of France.svg17–7Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: David Keane (Ireland)
Tries: Élodie Poublan 4'
Marie-Charlotte Hebel 14'
Sandrine Agricole 36'
Con: Aurélie Bailon 37'
Report Try: Lucy Millard 41'
Con: Nicola Halfpenny 42'
Test no. 843
24 August 2010
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg40–10Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Gabriel Lee (Hong Kong)
Tries: Mandy Marchak 1'
Patzer 11', 41'
Heather Moyse 16', 23', 72'
Cons: Anna Schnell 2', 12', 17', 42', 73'
Report Try: Charlotta Westin Vines 34'
Con: Ulrika Andersson Hall 35'
Pen: Ulrika Andersson Hall 21'
Test no. 847
28 August 2010
Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg32–5Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Sarah Corrigan (Australia)
Tries: Lindsay Wheeler 2'
Lucy Millard 13', 55'
Donna Kennedy 21'
Katy Green 47'
Cons: Nicola Halfpenny 14', 56'
Pen: Nicola Halfpenny 27'
Report Try: Johanna Norberg 72'
Test no. 849
28 August 2010
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg8–23Flag of France.svg  France Surrey Sports Park, Guildford, South East England
Referee: Dana Teagarden (USA)
Try: Kelly Russell 36'
Pen: Anna Schnell 14'
Report Tries: Lucille Godiveau 9', 70'
Cyrielle Bouisset 29'
Claire Canal 45'
Pen: Aurélie Bailon 20'

Ranking finals

9th–12th place

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
1 September - Guildford
 
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 25
 
5 September - Guildford
 
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 10
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 17
 
1 September - Guildford
 
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 29
 
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 32
 
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 10
 
Third place
 
 
5 September - Guildford
 
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 8
 
 
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 12
Semi-finals
Test no. 853
1 September 2010
South Africa  Flag of South Africa.svg25–10Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan Surrey Sports Park, Guildford
Referee: David Keane (Ireland)
Tries: Phumeza Gadu 39'
Zenay Jordaan 76'
Cherne Roberts 80'
Pens: Zandile Nojoko 14', 64'
Cons: Zandile Nojoko 40', 77'
Report Tries: Irina Amossova 33'
Alfiya Mustafina 50'
Test no. 854
1 September 2010
Wales  Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg32–10Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Surrey Sports Park, Guildford
Referee: Sherry Trumbull (Canada)
Tries: Caryl James 17'
Sioned Harries 25', 44'
Mellissa Berry 38'
Laura Prosser 71'
Jamie Kift 77'
Con: Awen Thomas 26'
Report Try: Charlotta Westin-Vines 13'
Pen: Lina Norman 34'
Con: Lina Norman 54'
11th place match
Test no. 859
5 September 2010
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 8–12 Kazakhstan  Flag of Kazakhstan.svg Surrey Sports Park, Guildford
Referee: Gabriel Lee (Hong Kong)
Try: Frida Ryberg 31'
Pen: Ulrika Andersson-Hall 39'
Report Tries: Lyudmila Sherer 6'
Anna Yakovleva 19'
Con: Aigerym Daurembayeva 20'
9th place match
Test no. 860
5 September 2010
South Africa  Flag of South Africa.svg17–29Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales Surrey Sports Park, Guildford
Referee: Andrew McMenemy (Scotland)
Tries: Zenay Jordaan 51'
Charmaine Kayser 69'
Phumeza Gadu 80+4'
Con: Yolanda Meiring 80+5'
Report Tries: Naomi Thomas 5', 38'
Mared Evans 40', 41'
Rhian Bowden 61'
Cons: Awen Thomas 40+1', 42'

5th–8th place

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
1 September - Guildford
 
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 41
 
5 September - Guildford
 
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 0
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 20
 
1 September - Guildford
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 23
 
IRFU flag.svg  Ireland 3
 
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 40
 
Third place
 
 
5 September - Guildford
 
 
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 8
 
 
IRFU flag.svg  Ireland 32
Semi-finals
Test no. 855
1 September 2010
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg41–0Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland Surrey Sports Park, Guildford
Referee: Javier Mancuso (Argentina)
Tries: Heather Moyse 4', 6'
Maria Gallo 18'
Mandy Marchak 61'
Cheryl Phillips 62', 72'
Pen: Anna Schnell 43'
Cons: Anna Schnell 4', 7', 61', 63'
Report
Test no. 856
1 September 2010
Ireland  IRFU flag.svg3–40Flag of the United States.svg  United States Surrey Sports Park, Guildford
Referee: Sébastien Minery (France)
Pen: Niamh Briggs 29' Report Tries: Victoria Folayan 11', 72'
Amy Daniels 36', 56'
Vanesha McGee 75'
Cons: Christy Ringgenberg 12', 21', 37', 57', 76'
7th place match
Test no. 861
5 September 2010
Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg8–32IRFU flag.svg  Ireland Surrey Sports Park, Guildford
Referee: Joyce Henry (Canada)
Try: Donna Kennedy 19'
Pen: Nicola Halfpenny 36'
Report Tries: Eliza Downey 9', 44'
Niamh Briggs 12', 65'
Orla Brennan 53'
Pen: Niamh Briggs 3'
Cons: Niamh Briggs 13', 54'
5th place match
Test no. 862
5 September 2010
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg20–23Flag of the United States.svg  United States Surrey Sports Park, Guildford
Referee: Sébastien Minery (France)
Tries: Heather Moyse 7'
Megan Gibbs 35'
Pens: Anna Schnell 3', 66'
Cons: Anna Schnell 8', 36'
Report Tries: Ashley English 30'
Lynelle Kugler 42'
Vanesha McGee 47'
Pens: Christy Ringgenberg 16', 20'
Con: Christy Ringgenberg 43'

Semi-finals and Final

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
1 September - London
 
 
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 45
 
5 September - London
 
Flag of France.svg  France 7
 
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 13
 
1 September - London
 
Flag of England.svg  England 10
 
Flag of England.svg  England 15
 
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 0
 
Third place
 
 
5 September - London
 
 
Flag of France.svg  France 8
 
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 22
Semi-finals
Test no. 857
1 September 2010
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg45–7Flag of France.svg  France Twickenham Stoop
Referee: Claire Daniels (England)
Tries: Carla Hohepa 9', 37'
Victoria Grant 23'
Huriana Manuel 27'
Renee Wickliffe 35'
Anna Richards 43'
Joan Sione 66'
Cons: Kelly Brazier 28', 36', 38', 44'
Emma Jensen 67'
Report Try: Laetitia Salles 41', 72'
Con: Aurélie Bailon 42'
Test no. 858
1 September 2010
England  Flag of England.svg15–0Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Twickenham Stoop
Referee: Nicky Inwood (New Zealand)
Tries: Catherine Spencer 6'
Danielle Waterman 22'
Pen: Alice Richardson 78'
Con: Katy McLean 7'
Report
3rd place match
Test no. 863
5 September 2010
France  Flag of France.svg8–22Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Twickenham Stoop
Referee: Dana Teagarden (USA)
Try: Laetitia Salles 74'
Pen: Aurélie Bailon 7'
Report Tries: Cobie-Jane Morgan 14', 31'
Rebecca Trethowan 27'
Tricia Brown 37'
Con: Nicole Beck 33'
Final
Test no. 864
5 September 2010
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg13–10Flag of England.svg  England Twickenham Stoop
Referee: Sarah Corrigan (Australia)
Try: Carla Hohepa 33'
Pens: Kelly Brazier 56', 66'
Con: Kelly Brazier 34'
Report Try: Charlotte Barras 61'
Pen: Katy McLean 43'
Con: Katy McLean 62'

Statistics

Teams

PointsTeamMatchesTriesConversionsPenaltiesDrops Yellow card.svg Red card.svg
186Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 530152060
171Flag of England.svg  England 525174010
146Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 520146070
136Flag of the United States.svg  United States 520124050
115Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 518111070
94IRFU flag.svg  Ireland 51642040
91Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 51552030
70Flag of France.svg  France 51222060
60Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 5933090
57Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 5932010
42Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 5426050
25Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 54110101

Individual leading point scorers

PointsNameTeamPositionAppearancesTriesConversionsPenaltiesDrops
48Kelly BrazierFlag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Centre/Wing541110
46Anna SchnellFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Fly-half501460
44Christy RinggenbergFlag of the United States.svg  United States Full back521140
35Carla HohepaFlag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Wing57000
35Heather MoyseFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Wing57000
34Niamh BriggsIRFU flag.svg  Ireland Full back54430
30Nichole BeckFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Fly-half411110
28Katy McLeanFlag of England.svg  England Fly-half401120
20Charlotte BarrasFlag of England.svg  England Centre44000
20Huriana ManuelFlag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Centre54000
20Mandy MarchakFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Centre54000
20Lucy MillardFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland Centre54000
20Cobie-Jane MorganFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Centre54000
20Joy NevilleIRFU flag.svg  Ireland No 844000
20Fiona PocockFlag of England.svg  England Wing44000
18Zandile NojokoFlag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Full back51320
17Ulrika Anderson-HallFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Fly-half40150

See also

Related Research Articles

Rugby World Cup International rugby union competition

The Rugby World Cup is a men's rugby union tournament contested every four years between the top international teams. The tournament was first held in 1987, when the tournament was co-hosted by New Zealand and Australia.

2007 Rugby World Cup 6th Rugby World Cup

The 2007 Rugby World Cup was the sixth Rugby World Cup, a quadrennial international rugby union competition inaugurated in 1987. Twenty nations competed for the Webb Ellis Cup in the tournament, which was hosted by France from 7 September to 20 October. France won the hosting rights in 2003, beating a bid from England. The competition consisted of 48 matches over 44 days; 42 matches were played in ten cities throughout France, as well as four in Cardiff, Wales, and two in Edinburgh, Scotland.

The 1991 Rugby World Cup was the second edition of the Rugby World Cup, and was jointly hosted by England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland and France: at the time, the five European countries who participated in the Five Nations Championship. This was the first Rugby World Cup to be staged in the northern hemisphere, with England the hosts of the final. Also for the first time, qualifying competitions were introduced as the number of entrants had increased from 16 nations four years before to a total of 33 countries. The eight quarter-finalists from 1987 qualified automatically with the remaining eight spots contested through qualifiers by 25 countries. This resulted in only one new side qualifying for the tournament, Western Samoa replacing Tonga. The same 16-team pool/knock-out format was used with just minor changes to the points system. South Africa was again not included because of sanctions imposed on the country by the IRB, due to the government's apartheid policies.

The United States men's national rugby union team, represents United States in men's international rugby union, nicknamed the Eagles it is controlled by USA Rugby. USA Rugby is a member of Rugby Americas North, one of six regional governing bodies under World Rugby. Until rugby returned to Olympic competition, with sevens at the 2016 Rio Games, the United States was the reigning Olympic rugby champion, having defeated the one other competitor in 1920 and the two other competitors at the 1924 Summer Olympics.

Rugby World Cup Sevens

The Rugby World Cup Sevens is the premier stand-alone international rugby sevens competition outside the Olympic Games. The event is contested every four years, with tournaments for men's and women's national teams co-hosted at the same venues. It is organised by World Rugby, the sport's governing body.

2011 Rugby World Cup 7th Rugby World Cup

The 2011 Rugby World Cup was the seventh Rugby World Cup, a quadrennial international rugby union competition inaugurated in 1987. The International Rugby Board (IRB) selected New Zealand as the host country in preference to Japan and South Africa at a meeting in Dublin on 17 November 2005. The tournament was won by New Zealand, who defeated France 8–7 in the final. The defending champions, South Africa, were eliminated by Australia 11–9 in the quarter-finals. The result marked the third time that the tournament was won by the country that hosted the event.

Canada national rugby union team

The Canada national rugby union team represents Canada in men's international rugby union and it is governed by Rugby Canada, and play in red and white. Canada is classified by World Rugby as a tier two rugby nation. Canada competes in competitions such as the Americas Rugby Championship and the Rugby World Cup.

2006 Womens Rugby World Cup

The 2006 Women's Rugby World Cup took place in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The tournament began on 31 August and ended on 17 September 2006. The 2006 tournament was the third World Cup approved by the IRB, the previous two being held 2002 in Spain and in the Netherlands, in 1998. The Black Ferns of New Zealand won the 2006 World Cup, defeating England in the final, as they had in 2002. It was New Zealand's third successive title.

2015 Rugby World Cup 8th Rugby World Cup

The 2015 Rugby World Cup was the eighth Rugby World Cup, the quadrennial rugby union world championship. The tournament was hosted by England from 18 September to 31 October. Of the 20 countries competing in the World Cup in 2011, there was only one change: Uruguay replaced Russia. This was the first World Cup with no new teams to the tournament.

The 2005–06 World Sevens Series was the seventh in an annual IRB Sevens World Series of rugby sevens tournaments run by the International Rugby Board since 1999-2000. The participating teams in each World Sevens Series are full national sides.

The first Rugby World Cup was held in 1987, hosted by Australia and New Zealand who pushed for the tournament to be approved. Since the first tournament, 8 others have been held at four-year intervals.

The Rugby World Cup host nation is selected by World Rugby at a meeting six years before each tournament. Each of the Rugby World Cups from 1987 to 2015 were hosted by countries that are considered the traditional powers in World Rugby. The first non Rugby Championship or Six Nations country to host a Rugby World Cup was Japan in 2019, after failed bids for the 2011 and 2015 tournaments.

Rugby World Cup (womens)

The Rugby World Cup for women, historically known as the Women's Rugby World Cup, is the premier international competition in rugby union for women. The tournament is organised by the sport's governing body, World Rugby. The championships are currently held every four years; the event was most recently held in Ireland in 2017. World Rugby has reset the tournament on a new four-year cycle to avoid conflict with the Commonwealth Games and Women's World Cup Sevens; World Cups will thus be held every four years after 2017.

The 2002 Women's Rugby World Cup was the second World Cup fully sanctioned by the sports governing body the International Rugby Board (IRB). The tournament was held in Barcelona, Spain. The format was the same as the previous tournament and again 16 nations competed.

2007 Under 19 Rugby World Championship

The International Rugby Board (IRB) awarded the 2007 Under 19 Rugby World Championship to the Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU) and the Ulster branch hosted it. The Tournament, which took place in Belfast, Northern Ireland from 4–21 April, was split into two divisions of twelve teams. Division A games took place in Belfast at Belfast Harlequins' Deramore Park, Ulster Rugby's Ravenhill Stadium, and Cooke RFC/Instonians' Shaw's Bridge complex. Division B games were held in Queen's University of Belfast's The Dub complex and Malone RFC's Gibson Park in Belfast, and Bangor RFC's Upritchard Park in Bangor.

2011 Rugby World Cup qualifying

2011 Rugby World Cup qualifying began at the 2007 tournament in France, where twelve teams earned a place in the finals of the tournament, this automatically qualified them for the 2011 Rugby World Cup in New Zealand.

2019 Rugby World Cup ninth edition of the Rugby World Cup

The 2019 Rugby World Cup was the ninth edition of the Rugby World Cup, the quadrennial world championship for men's rugby union teams. It was hosted in Japan from 20 September to 2 November in 12 venues all across the country. The opening match was played at Ajinomoto Stadium in Chōfu, Tokyo, with the final match being held at International Stadium Yokohama in Yokohama. This was the first time that the tournament had taken place in Asia and outside the traditional Tier 1 rugby nations.

2014 Womens Rugby World Cup

The 2014 Women's Rugby World Cup was the seventh edition of the Women's Rugby World Cup, and the sixth held in Europe. The World Cup Final took place on 17 August.

The women's 2013 Rugby World Cup Sevens tournament was held at Luzhniki stadium and nearby Gorodok Stadium, both in Moscow. The tournament was held from 29 June to 30 June, with New Zealand beating Canada 29−12 at the final. The eight quarter-finalists qualified as core teams for the 2013–14 IRB Women's Sevens World Series.

The 2021 Rugby World Cup is scheduled to be the ninth Rugby World Cup for women, to be held in New Zealand between 18 September and 16 October 2021 in the cities of Auckland and Whangārei. This will be the first women's Rugby World Cup to be held in the southern hemisphere. The eighth World Cup was played in 2017 in Dublin and Belfast, setting record attendances and viewership numbers.

References

  1. Richards, Huw (19 August 2010). "Rugby – Women's Rugby World Cup Set to Kick Off". New Zealand: NYTimes.com. Retrieved 30 October 2012.
  2. IRB Statistics Archived 27 February 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  3. "France to host Women's RWC 2014". 30 June 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2012 via YouTube.
  4. New Zealand beat England in women's World Cup final BBC Sport, 5 September 2010
  5. Archived 16 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  6. England to host Women's RWC 2010 Archived 19 August 2009 at the Wayback Machine International Rugby Board, 23 September 2008
  7. [ dead link ]
  8. "Tickets go on sale for Women's RWC 2010". 22 March 2010. Archived from the original on 23 August 2010. Retrieved 19 December 2010.
  9. "Record broadcast coverage to showcase WRWC". 20 August 2010. Archived from the original on 23 November 2010. Retrieved 19 December 2010.
  10. "Female match officials to make history". 16 December 2009. Archived from the original on 21 December 2010. Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  11. "WRWC 2010: match official appointments". 18 August 2010. Archived from the original on 19 July 2011. Retrieved 16 November 2010.
  12. "Sarah Corrigan to referee World Cup final". 2 September 2010. Archived from the original on 5 November 2010. Retrieved 16 November 2010.
  13. "Pools set for Women's Rugby World Cup 2010". 18 November 2009. Archived from the original on 28 November 2009. Retrieved 30 August 2010.
  14. 1 2 3 "Rules of the tournament". Archived from the original on 27 August 2010. Retrieved 30 August 2010.
External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Rugby World Cup 2010: Semi-Final - England v Australia on YouTube