2015 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA play-offs

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The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA play-offs decided the eighth and final UEFA qualifier for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.

The European qualifying for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was a women's football tournament organized by UEFA. A record 46 entrants were competing for eight spots. For the first time Albania and Montenegro entered a senior competitive tournament. The first matches were held on 4 April 2013.

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

Contents

Format

After conclusion of the group stage the four runners-up with the best record against the sides first, third, fourth and fifth in their groups played home and away matches, to determine the last participant in the FIFA World Cup.

For each play-off tie, the team that scored more goals on aggregate over the two legs qualified for the final tournament. If the aggregate score was level, the away goals rule applied, i.e., the team that scored more goals away from home over the two legs advanced. If away goals were also equal, then thirty minutes of extra time would be played, divided into two fifteen-minutes halves. The away goals rule was again applied after extra time, i.e., if there are goals scored during extra time and the aggregate score was still level, the visiting team advanced by virtue of more away goals scored. If no goals were scored during extra time, the tie would be decided by penalty shoot-out. [1]

The away goals rule is a method of breaking ties in association football and other sports when teams play each other twice, once at each team's home ground. By the away goals rule, the team that has scored more goals "away from home" will win if scores are otherwise equal. This is sometimes expressed by saying that away goals "count double" in the event of a tie.

A penalty shoot-out is a method of determining which team is awarded victory in an association football match that cannot end in a draw, when the score is tied after the regulation playing time as well as extra time have expired. In a penalty shoot-out, each team takes turns shooting at goal from the penalty mark, with the goal only defended by the opposing team's goalkeeper. Each team has five shots which must be taken by different kickers; the team that makes more successful kicks is declared the victor. Shoot-outs finish as soon as one team has an insurmountable lead. If scores are level after five pairs of shots, the shootout progresses into additional "sudden-death" rounds. Balls successfully kicked into the goal during a shoot-out do not count as goals for the individual kickers or the team, and are tallied separately from the goals scored during normal play. Although the procedure for each individual kick in the shoot-out resembles that of a penalty kick, there are some differences. Most notably, neither the kicker nor any player other than the goalkeeper may play the ball again once it has been kicked.

Ranking of second-placed teams

Matches against the sixth-placed team in each group are not included in this ranking. As a result, eight matches played by each team counted for the purposes of the second-placed table.

The ranking of the runners-up is determined by the following parameters in this order: [1]

  1. Highest number of points
  2. Goal difference
  3. Highest number of goals scored
  4. Highest number of away goals scored
  5. Position in the UEFA national team coefficient ranking system;
PosGrpTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1 5 Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 8611295+24 19 Play-offs
2 2 Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 8611225+17 19
3 4 Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 8602216+15 18
4 6 Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 8512238+15 16
5 1 Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 851214173 16
6 7 Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 85032113+8 15
7 3 Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 8413169+7 13
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Goals scored; 4) Away goals scored; 5) National team coefficient.

Draw

The draw was held on 23 September 2014 at 14:00 local time at Nyon, Switzerland. [2]

Nyon Place in Vaud, Switzerland

Nyon[njɔ̃] is a municipality in the district of Nyon in the canton of Vaud in Switzerland. It is located some 25 kilometers north east of Geneva's city centre, and since the 1970s it has become part of the Geneva metropolitan area. It lies on the shores of Lake Geneva and is the seat of the district of Nyon. The town has a population of 20,533 and is famous in the sporting world for being the headquarters of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) and the European Club Association (ECA). It is connected to the rest of Switzerland by way of the Route Suisse, the A1 Motorway and the railways of the Arc Lémanique.

Seeding

In the play-off draw, teams were seeded according to their UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Ranking (shown in brackets). [3]

SeededUnseeded

Flag of Italy.svg  Italy (6)
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands (8)

Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland (12)
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine (15)

Bracket

 SemifinalsFinal
             
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1 0 1 
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 2 2 4 
  Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1 2 3
 Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1 1 2
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 2 2 4
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 1 2 3 

All times are CEST (UTC+02:00) during summer and CET (UTC+01:00) during winter.

Central European Summer Time daylight savings time in the central european time zone

Central European Summer Time (CEST), sometime referred also as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time (UTC+01:00) during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+02:00, which makes it the same as Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.

UTC+02:00 identifier for a time offset from UTC of +2

UTC+02:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of +02. In ISO 8601 the associated time would be written as 2019-02-07T23:28:34+02:00. This time is used in:

Central European Time standard time (UTC+01:00)

Central European Time (CET), used in most parts of Europe and a few North African countries, is a standard time which is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The time offset from UTC can be written as UTC+01:00. The same standard time, UTC+01:00, is also known as Middle European Time and under other names like Berlin Time, Warsaw Time and Romance Standard Time (RST), Paris Time or Rome Time.

Semifinals

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg1–4Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1–20–2
Italy  Flag of Italy.svg4–3Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 2–12–2
Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg 1–2 Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Little Soccerball shade.svg 49' (pen.) Report Martens Soccerball shade.svg 10'
Melis Soccerball shade.svg 23' (pen.)
Attendance: 2,098
Referee: Kateryna Monzul (Ukraine)
Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2–0 Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
Martens Soccerball shade.svg 51'
Melis Soccerball shade.svg 77'
Report
Attendance: 7,600
Referee: Esther Staubli (Switzerland)

Netherlands won 4–1 on aggregate and advanced to final.


Italy  Flag of Italy.svg 2–1 Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
Cernoia Soccerball shade.svg 1'
Gabbiadini Soccerball shade.svg 45+1'
Report Apanaschenko Soccerball shade.svg 34'
Attendance: 5,000
Referee: Jana Adámková (Czech Republic)
Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg 2–2 Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Dyatel Soccerball shade.svg 26', 47' Report Gabbiadini Soccerball shade.svg 55'
Panico Soccerball shade.svg 79'
Attendance: 1,936
Referee: Efthalia Mitsi (Greece)

Italy won 4–3 on aggregate and advanced to final.

Final

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg3–2Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1–12–1
Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg 1–1 Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Miedema Soccerball shade.svg 54' Report Gabbiadini Soccerball shade.svg 19'
Attendance: 13,109
Italy  Flag of Italy.svg 1–2 Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Van der Gragt Soccerball shade.svg 53' (o.g.) Report Miedema Soccerball shade.svg 9', 43'

Netherlands won 3–2 on aggregate and qualified for 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Goalscorers

3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
Own goal

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