2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

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2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification
Tournament details
Dates3 April 2017 – 1 December 2018
Teams144 (from 6 confederations)
Tournament statistics
Matches played392
Goals scored1,562 (3.98 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Jamaica.svg Khadija Shaw (19 goals)
2015
2023

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process decided all 24 teams which played in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the hosts France qualifying automatically. [1] It is the eighth FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament is the third to be hosted in Europe, after the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden and the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup in Germany.

2019 FIFA Womens World Cup 2019 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

France womens national football team womens national association football team representing France

The French women's national football team is directed by the French Football Federation (FFF). The team competes as a member of UEFA in various international football tournaments such as the FIFA Women's World Cup, UEFA Women's Euro, the Summer Olympics, and the Algarve Cup.

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

Contents

Qualified teams

Teams qualified for World Cup
Teams failed to qualify for World Cup
Teams expelled from the tournament by FIFA
Teams did not enter qualification 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification.png
  Teams qualified for World Cup
  Teams failed to qualify for World Cup
  Teams expelled from the tournament by FIFA
  Teams did not enter qualification
TeamQualified asQualification dateAppearance
in finals
Last
appearance
Consecutive
streak
Previous best performance
Flag of France.svg  France Hosts19 March 20154th 2015 3Fourth place (2011)
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup 3rd place9 April 20187th 2015 2Runners-up (1999)
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup 4th place12 April 20182nd 2015 2Group stage (2015)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup runners-up13 April 20187th 2015 7Quarter-finals (2007, 2011, 2015)
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup champions13 April 20188th 2015 8Champions (2011)
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup 5th place16 April 20183rd 2015 2Round of 16 (2015)
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 2018 Copa América Femenina champions19 April 20188th 2015 8Runners-up (2007)
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 2018 Copa América Femenina runners-up22 April 20181st1Debut
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain UEFA qualification Group 7 winners8 June 20182nd 2015 2Group stage (2015)
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy UEFA qualification Group 6 winners8 June 20183rd 1999 1Quarter-finals (1991)
Flag of England.svg  England UEFA qualification Group 1 winners31 August 20185th 2015 4Third place (2015)
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland UEFA qualification Group 2 winners4 September 20181st1Debut
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway UEFA qualification Group 3 winners4 September 20188th 2015 8Champions (1995)
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden UEFA qualification Group 4 winners4 September 20188th 2015 8Runners-up (2003)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany UEFA qualification Group 5 winners4 September 20188th 2015 8Champions (2003, 2007)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship runners-up14 October 20187th 2015 7Fourth place (2003)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship champions14 October 20188th 2015 8Champions (1991, 1999, 2015)
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship 3rd place17 October 20181st1Debut
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands UEFA qualification play-off winners13 November 20182nd 2015 2Round of 16 (2015)
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off winners13 November 20183rd 2007 1Group stage (2003, 2007)
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations champions27 November 20188th 2015 8Quarter-finals (1999)
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations runners-up27 November 20181st1Debut
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations 3rd place30 November 20182nd 2015 2Round of 16 (2015)
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 2018 OFC Women's Nations Cup champions1 December 20185th 2015 4Group stage (1991, 2007, 2011, 2015)

Qualification process

The slot allocation was approved by the F IFA Council on 13–14 October 2016. [2] The slots for each confederation are unchanged from that of the previous tournament except the slot for the hosts is moved from CONCACAF (wCanada) to UEFA (France). [3]

2015 FIFA Womens World Cup qualification

The qualification for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup determined which 23 teams joined Canada, the hosts of the 2015 tournament, to play for the Women's World Cup.

Summary of qualification

Qualifying matches started on 3 April 2017, and ended on 1 December 2018.

Apart from the host France, 207 of the 210 remaining FIFA member associations could qualify through their own confederation's qualifying process if they choose to enter. The exceptions were Guatemala [4] and Kuwait, [5] whose football associations were suspended by FIFA, and Equatorial Guinea, which were banned from the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. [6] Guam, Lebanon, Sierra Leone, and Turks and Caicos Islands were initially drawn into qualifying stages but they withdrew from their qualifying tournaments.

FIFA Women's World Cup qualification is the process a national women's association football team goes through to qualify for the FIFA Women's World Cup.

The Guatemala women's national football team is controlled by the Federación Nacional de Fútbol de Guatemala. They are one of the top women's national football teams in the Central American region along with Costa Rica, having won the 1999 UNCAF championship.

Kuwait womens national football team national association football team

The Kuwait women's national football team, represents Kuwait in international women's association football and is governed by Kuwait Football Association (KFA).

More than 30 countries, mostly in Asia and Africa, did not enter qualification, including Saudi Arabia, Tunisia and Egypt, which qualified teams for the 2018 FIFA World Cup. [7]

2018 FIFA World Cup 21st FIFA World Cup, held in Russia in 2018

The 2018 FIFA World Cup was the 21st FIFA World Cup, an international football tournament contested by the men's national teams of the member associations of FIFA once every four years. It took place in Russia from 14 June to 15 July 2018. It was the first World Cup to be held in Eastern Europe, and the 11th time that it had been held in Europe. At an estimated cost of over $14.2 billion, it was the most expensive World Cup. It was also the first World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

ConfederationTournamentAvailable slotsNations startedNations eliminatedNations qualifiedQualification startQualification end
AFC 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup 5241953 April 201720 April 2018
CAF 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations 324 [1] 2134 April 20181 December 2018
CONCACAF 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship 3.528 [2] 2535 May 201817 October 2018 [3]
CONMEBOL 2018 Copa América Femenina 2.510734 April 201822 April 2018 [3]
OFC 2018 OFC Women's Nations Cup 11110124 August 20181 December 2018
UEFA 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA) 8+H46+H388+H6 April 201713 November 2018
Total2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification23+H143+H12023+H3 April 20171 December 2018
1 25 teams participate in the CAF qualification, however Equatorial Guinea cannot qualify for the World Cup regardless of their performance in the Africa Cup of Nations.
2 Although 30 teams participated in the CONCACAF qualification, Guadeloupe and Martinique are not FIFA members and thus were ineligible to qualify for the World Cup.
3 A team each from CONCACAF (Panama) and CONMEBOL (Argentina) competed in a play-off on 8 and 13 November 2018 for a place in the World Cup.

Confederation qualification

AFC

As in the previous World Cup cycle, the AFC Women's Asian Cup served as the World Cup qualifying tournament for AFC members. The World Cup qualifying process was as follows: [8]

AFC Womens Asian Cup

The AFC Women's Asian Cup is a quadrennial competition in women's football for national teams which belong to the Asian Football Confederation (AFC). It is the premier women's football competition in the AFC region for national teams. The competition is also known as the Asian Women's Football Championship and the Asian Women's Championship. 19 tournaments have been held, with the current champions being Japan. The competition also serves as a qualifying tournament for the FIFA Women's World Cup.

Asian Football Confederation governing body of association football in Asia

The Asian Football Confederation (AFC) is the governing body of association football in Asia and Australia. It has 47 member countries, mostly located on the Asian and Australian continent, but excludes the transcontinental countries with territory in both Europe and Asia – Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Turkey – which are instead members of UEFA. Three other states located geographically along the western fringe of Asia – Cyprus, Armenia and Israel – are also UEFA members. On the other hand, Australia, formerly in the OFC, joined the Asian Football Confederation in 2006, and the Oceanian island of Guam, a territory of the United States, is also a member of AFC, in addition to Northern Mariana Islands, one of the Two Commonwealths of the United States. Hong Kong and Macau, although not independent countries, are also members of the AFC.

The 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification was the qualification tournament for the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup.

Japan womens national football team womens national association football team representing Japan

The Japan women's national football team, or Nadeshiko Japan (なでしこジャパン), represents Japan in women's association football and is run by the Japan Football Association (JFA). It is the most successful women's national team from the Asian Football Confederation. Its highest ranking in the FIFA Women's World Rankings is 3rd, achieved in December 2011.

Australia womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Australia

The Australian women's national soccer team is overseen by the governing body for soccer in Australia, Football Federation Australia (FFA), which is currently a member of the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) and the regional ASEAN Football Federation (AFF) since leaving the Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) in 2006. The team's official nickname is the Matildas, having been known as the Female Socceroos before 1995. Under a naming rights deal with Scentre Group and its predecessor, Westfield Group, the team has been branded as Westfield Matildas since 2008.

Qualifying stage

Four teams advanced from the qualifying stage: Philippines (who qualified as Group A runners-up to Jordan who had already automatically qualified for the final tournament as hosts) South Korea (Group B winners), Thailand (Group C winners), and Vietnam (Group D winners).

Final tournament

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 3300151+149 Knockout stage and
2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 320196+36
3Flag of the Philippines.svg  Philippines 31023743 Fifth place match
4Flag of Jordan.svg  Jordan (H)3003316130
Source: AFC
(H) Host.

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 312091+85 [lower-alpha 1] Knockout stage and
2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 312051+45 [lower-alpha 1]
3Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 312040+45 [lower-alpha 1] Fifth place match
4Flag of Vietnam.svg  Vietnam 3003016160
Source: AFC
Notes:
  1. 1 2 3 Head-to-head results: Australia 0–0 South Korea, South Korea 0–0 Japan, Japan 1–1 Australia. Head-to-head standings:
    • Australia: 2 pts, 0 GD, 1 GF
    • Japan: 2 pts, 0 GD, 1 GF
    • South Korea: 2 pts, 0 GD, 0 GF
    South Korea are ranked third on head-to-head goals scored. Australia and Japan are tied on their own head-to-head result, and are ranked on total goal difference.

Knockout stage (top five teams qualify for World Cup)

 
Semi-finals Final
 
      
 
17 April – King Abdullah II
 
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 1
 
20 April – Amman International
 
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 3
 
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 1
 
17 April – King Abdullah II
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 0
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia (p)2 (3)
 
 
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 2 (1)
 
Third place match
 
 
20 April – Amman International
 
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 3
 
 
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 1
 
Fifth place match
 
  
 
16 April – Amman International
 
 
Flag of the Philippines.svg  Philippines 0
 
 
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 5
 

CAF

As in the previous World Cup cycle, the Africa Women Cup of Nations served as the World Cup qualifying tournament for CAF members. The World Cup qualifying process was as follows:

FIFA banned Equatorial Guinea from qualifying for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, meaning they could not qualify for the World Cup regardless of their performance in the Africa Women Cup of Nations. [6]

Qualifying stage

The seven winners of the second qualifying round advanced to the final tournament: Algeria, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Mali, Nigeria, South Africa, and Zambia.

Final tournament

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 321062+47 Knockout stage
2Flag of Mali.svg  Mali 320165+16
3Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana (H)31113304
4Flag of Algeria.svg  Algeria 30032750
Source: CAF
(H) Host.

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 321092+77 Knockout stage
2Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 3201101+96
3Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia 311165+14
4Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea 3003118170
Source: CAF

Knockout stage (top three teams qualify for World Cup)

 
Semi-finals Final
 
      
 
27 November – Accra
 
 
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 0 (2)
 
1 December – Accra
 
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria (p)0 (4)
 
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria (p)0 (4)
 
27 November – Cape Coast
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 0 (3)
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 2
 
 
Flag of Mali.svg  Mali 0
 
Third place match
 
 
30 November – Cape Coast
 
 
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 4
 
 
Flag of Mali.svg  Mali 2

CONCACAF

As in the previous World Cup cycle, the CONCACAF Women's Championship served as the World Cup qualifying tournament for CONCACAF members. The World Cup qualifying process was as follows:

Guadeloupe and Martinique entered Caribbean qualifying for the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship. However, as they are not FIFA members, they were ineligible to qualify for the World Cup.

Qualifying stage

Costa Rica and Panama qualified from the Central American Zone, while Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and Cuba qualified from the Caribbean Zone.

Final tournament

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States (H)3300180+189 Knockout stage
2Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 32015506
3Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 31024953
4Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 3003114130
Source: CONCACAF
(H) Host.

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3300171+169 Knockout stage
2Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 3201102+86
3Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 310294+53
4Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 3003029290
Source: CONCACAF

Knockout stage (top three teams qualify for World Cup, fourth place advance to CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off)

 
Semi-finals Final
 
      
 
14 October – Frisco
 
 
Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 0
 
17 October – Frisco
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 7
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 0
 
14 October – Frisco
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 6
 
 
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0
 
Third place play-off
 
 
17 October – Frisco
 
 
Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 2 (2)
 
 
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica (p)2 (4)

CONMEBOL

As in the previous World Cup cycle, the Copa América Femenina served as the World Cup qualifying tournament for CONMEBOL members. The World Cup qualifying process was as follows:

Final tournament

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 4310162+1410 Final stage
2Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 422082+68
3Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay 42117707
4Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 401321191
5Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru 4013112111
Source: CONMEBOL

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 4400221+2112 Final stage
2Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 4301126+69
3Flag of Venezuela (state).svg  Venezuela 420296+36
4Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia 4103118173
5Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 4004316130
Source: CONMEBOL

Final stage (top two teams qualify for World Cup, third place advance to CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off)

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 330091+89 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 311153+24
3Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 31023853 CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off
4Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 30121651
Source: CONMEBOL

OFC

As in the previous World Cup cycle, the OFC Women's Nations Cup served as the World Cup qualifying tournament for OFC members. The World Cup qualifying process was as follows:

Qualifying stage

Fiji won the qualifying stage and qualified for the final tournament.

Final tournament

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 3300143+119 Knockout stage
2New Caledonia flags merged (2017).svg  New Caledonia (H)32018806
3Flag of French Polynesia.svg  Tahiti 301281241
4Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 301251271
Source: OFC
(H) Host.

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 3300270+279 Knockout stage
2Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 32011510+56
3Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 3102123223
4Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 3003010100
Source: OFC

Knockout stage (winner qualifies for World Cup)

 
Semi-finals Final
 
      
 
28 November – Maré
 
 
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 1
 
1 December – Nouméa
 
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 5
 
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 0
 
28 November – Lifou
 
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 8
 
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 8
 
 
New Caledonia flags merged (2017).svg  New Caledonia 0
 
Third place match
 
 
1 December – Nouméa
 
 
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 7
 
 
New Caledonia flags merged (2017).svg  New Caledonia 1

UEFA

As in the previous World Cup cycle, UEFA organised a tournament for its members designed only for World Cup qualifying. The World Cup qualifying process was as follows: [20]

Preliminary round

Five teams advanced from the preliminary round: Kazakhstan (Group 1), Albania (Group 2), Israel (Group 3) and the Faroe Islands (Group 4) advanced as group winners, and Moldova advanced as the best runner-up.

Qualifying group stage

  The seven group winners qualify directly for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.
  The four best group runners-up (not counting results against fifth-placed team) advance to the play-offs.

Group 1

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of England.svg  England 8710291+2822 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 852173+417
3Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 84131613+313
4Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 8107319163 [lower-alpha 1]
5Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 8107221193 [lower-alpha 1]
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. 1 2 Head-to-head results: Kazakhstan 0–2 Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina 0–2 Kazakhstan (tied on head-to-head results, ranked on total goal difference).

Group 2

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 8701197+1221 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 8611215+1619 Play-offs
3Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 83231612+411
4Flag of Albania.svg  Albania 8116622164
5Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 8107521163
Source: UEFA

Group 3

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 8701224+1821 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 8611222+2019 Play-offs
3Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 8413106+413
4Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 8107427233 [lower-alpha 1]
5Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 8107423193 [lower-alpha 1]
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. 1 2 Head-to-head results: Slovakia 1–3 Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland 0–1 Slovakia.

Group 4

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 8701222+2021 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 8512228+1416 Play-offs
3Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 8413910113
4Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 8116826184
5Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 8035520153
Source: UEFA

Group 5

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 8701383+3521 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 8521226+1617
3Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 8422208+1214
4Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 8206920116
5Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg  Faroe Islands 8008153520
Source: UEFA

Group 6

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 8701194+1521 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 8611286+2219 Play-offs
3Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 8323228+1411
4Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 812571585
5Flag of Moldova.svg  Moldova 8017245431
Source: UEFA

Group 7

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 8800252+2324 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 8512197+1216
3Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 8314913410
4Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 821551387
5Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 8017023231
Source: UEFA

Ranking of second-placed teams (only results against first, third and fourth-placed teams taken into account)

PosGrpTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1 3 Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 6411162+1413 Play-offs
2 2 Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 6411135+813
3 6 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 641196+313
4 4 Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 6402177+1012
5 5 Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 632196+311
6 1 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 632153+211
7 7 Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 6312117+410
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) goals scored; 4) away goals scored; 5) disciplinary points; 6) coefficient.

Play-offs

The play-off final winner qualifies for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

  Play-off semi-finals Play-off final
             
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 224 
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 011 
  Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 314
 Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 011
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 213
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland (a)213 

CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off

The inter-confederation play-off was contested between CONCACAF's fourth-placed team Panama and CONMEBOL's third-placed team Argentina. The winners qualified for the World Cup. The draw for the order of legs was held on 9 June 2018 in Zürich during a meeting between the secretary generals of CONCACAF and CONMEBOL. Argentina were drawn to host the first leg, while Panama (the identity of the team from CONCACAF was not known at time of draw) were drawn to host the second leg. [22]

The matches took place on 8 and 13 November 2018, [23] [24] [25] during the women's international match calendar period.

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Argentina  Flag of Argentina.svg5–1Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 4–0 1–1

Top goalscorers

There were 1562 goals scored in 392 matches, for an average of 3.98 goals per match.

19 goals

14 goals

10 goals

9 goals

8 goals

7 goals

6 goals

References and notes

  1. "France to host the FIFA Women's World Cup in 2019". FIFA.com. 19 March 2015.
  2. Template:Cite iweb
  3. "FIFA leaves berths unchanged for 2019 Women's World Cup". The Big Story. Associated Press. 15 October 2016. Retrieved 29 October 2016.
  4. "Suspension of the Guatemala Football Association". FIFA.com. 28 October 2016.
  5. "Suspension of the Kuwait Football Association". FIFA.com. 16 October 2015.
  6. 1 2 "Equatorial Guinea expelled from FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019". FIFA.com. 5 October 2017.
  7. Kolasa, Matthew (24 July 2018). "The Beautiful Game Fails Women". Fair Observer.
  8. "AFC Women's Asian Cup 2018 Competition Regulations" (PDF). AFC.
  9. "AFC Competitions Calendar 2017" (PDF). AFC. 12 April 2016.
  10. "Teams set to find out path to AFC Women's Asian Cup Jordan 2018". AFC. 20 January 2017.
  11. "AFC Competitions Calendar 2018" (PDF). AFC. 12 April 2016.
  12. "Jordan to host AFC Women's Asian Cup 2018 finals". AFC. 4 September 2016.
  13. "Nigeria draw bye in 2018 Women's AFCON qualifiers". busybuddiesng.com. 4 October 2017. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  14. "GHANA TO HOST 2018 AFRICA WOMEN CUP OF NATIONS". dhakaba.com. 28 September 2016. Archived from the original on 11 April 2018. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  15. "Decisions of the CAF Executive Committee of 14 March 2017". CAFonline.com. 14 March 2017.
  16. "United States Set to Host 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship in October". CONCACAF.com. 23 March 2018.
  17. "Paraguay, Chile, Ecuador y Argentina realizarán torneos sudamericanos femeninos". CONMEBOL.com. 25 April 2017.
  18. "La Copa América Femenina se celebrará del 4 al 22 de abril". CONMEBOL.com. 21 July 2017.
  19. 1 2 "OFC Women's Nations Cup confirmed". Oceania Football Confederation. 12 March 2018.
  20. "Regulations of the UEFA European qualifying competition for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 2017-19" (PDF). UEFA.
  21. "Coefficient Ranking of the Teams Participating in the Qualifying Competition" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  22. "Argentina to host intercontinental play-off first leg on road to France 2019". FIFA.com. 9 June 2018.
  23. "Fecha y sede para el repechaje" (in Spanish). Argentine Football Association. Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 24 October 2018.
  24. "Repechaje intercontinental femenino será el 8 y 13 de noviembre" (in Spanish). Panamanian Football Federation. 19 October 2018. Retrieved 24 October 2018.
  25. "El juego Argentina ante Panamá cambió de sede" (in Spanish). Panamanian Football Federation. 23 October 2018. Retrieved 24 October 2018.

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The Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) is one of the six continental confederations of international association football, consisting of New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, and other Pacific Island countries. It promotes the game in Oceania and allows the member nations to qualify for the FIFA World Cup.

The 2006 FIFA World Cup qualification competition was a series of tournaments organised by the six FIFA confederations. Each confederation — the AFC (Asia), CAF (Africa), CONCACAF, CONMEBOL, OFC (Oceania), and UEFA (Europe) — was allocated a certain number of the 32 places at the tournament. A total of 197 teams entered the qualification process for the 2006 FIFA World Cup. In 2001 FIFA ended automatic qualification of the reigning champion, so that 2002 champions Brazil became first to participate in the qualifying tournament. The hosts (Germany) retained their automatic spot.

The 1966 FIFA World Cup qualification was a series of tournaments organised by the five FIFA confederations. The 1966 FIFA World Cup featured 16 teams with one place reserved for the host nation, England, and one reserved for defending champions, Brazil. The remaining 14 places were determined by a qualification process in which the other 72 teams, from the five FIFA confederations, competed. UEFA, CONCACAF and CONMEBOL qualification was determined within the confederations, whilst AFC and CAF teams competed for one place at the tournament.

99 teams entered the 1974 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, competing for 16 spots in the final tournament. West Germany, as the hosts, and Brazil, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 14 spots open for competition.

The 2002 FIFA World Cup qualification competition was a series of tournaments organised by the six FIFA confederations. Each confederation — the AFC (Asia), CAF (Africa), CONCACAF, CONMEBOL, OFC (Oceania), and UEFA (Europe) — was allocated a certain number of the 32 places at the tournament. 199 teams entered the tournament qualification rounds, competing for 32 spots in the final tournament. South Korea and Japan, as the co-hosts, and France, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 29 spots open for competition.

A total of 107 teams entered the 1978 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, which began with the preliminary qualification draw on 20 November 1975 at Guatemala City, competing for a total of 16 spots in the final tournament. Argentina, as the hosts, and West Germany, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 14 spots open for competition.

The 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification was a series of tournaments organised by the six FIFA confederations. The 1994 FIFA World Cup featured 24 teams with one place reserved for the host nation, United States, and one place for the defending champions, Germany. The remaining 22 places were determined by a qualification process, in which 147 teams, from the six FIFA confederations, competed. Most of the successful teams were determined within these confederations, with a limited number of inter-confederation play-offs occurring at the end of the process.

The 1998 FIFA World Cup qualification competition was a series of tournaments organised by the six FIFA confederations. Each confederation — the AFC (Asia), CAF (Africa), CONCACAF, CONMEBOL, OFC (Oceania), and UEFA (Europe) — was allocated a certain number of the 32 places at the tournament. A total of 174 teams entered the 1998 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, competing for a total of 32 spots in the final tournament. The 1998 FIFA World Cup featured 32 teams, with two places reserved for France and Brazil as host nation and defending champions, respectively. The remaining 30 places were determined by a qualification process, in which the other 174 teams, from the six FIFA confederations, competed.

The 2010 FIFA World Cup qualification competition was a series of tournaments organised by the six FIFA confederations. Each confederation — the AFC (Asia), CAF (Africa), CONCACAF, CONMEBOL, OFC (Oceania), and UEFA (Europe) — was allocated a certain number of the 32 places at the tournament. A total of 205 teams entered the qualification competition, with South Africa, as the host, qualifying for the World Cup automatically. The first qualification matches were played on 25 August 2007 and qualification concluded on 18 November 2009. Overall, 2341 goals were scored over 852 matches, scoring on average 2.74 per match.

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process saw 48 teams from the six FIFA confederations compete for the 12 places in the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup finals. The places were divided as follows:

The qualification process for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup saw 67 teams from the six FIFA confederations compete for the 16 places in the tournament's finals. The places were divided as follows:

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process decided the 15 teams which played at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the host China qualifying automatically as the host nation. The qualification process for the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup saw 99 teams from the six FIFA confederations compete for the 16 places in the tournament's finals. The places were divided as follows:

Qualification for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup determines which 15 teams join Germany, the hosts of the 2011 tournament, to play for the Women's World Cup. Europe has 5.5 qualifying berths, Asia 3 berths, North and Central America 2.5 berths, Africa 2 berths, South America 2 berths and Oceania 1 berth. The 16th spot was determined through a play-off match between the third-placed team in North/Central America and the winner of repechage play-offs in Europe.

The 2014 FIFA World Cup qualification was a series of tournaments organised by the six FIFA confederations. The 2014 FIFA World Cup featured 32 teams, with one place reserved for the host nation, Brazil. The remaining 31 places were determined by a qualification process, in which the other 207 teams, from the six FIFA confederations, competed. Most of the successful teams were determined within these confederations, with a limited number of inter-confederation play-offs occurring at the end of the process.

The 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification process was a series of tournaments organised by the six FIFA confederations to decide 31 of the 32 teams which would play in the 2018 FIFA World Cup, with Russia qualifying automatically as hosts. All 210 remaining FIFA member associations were eligible to enter the qualifying process, and for the first time in World Cup history, all eligible national teams registered for the preliminary competition, but Zimbabwe and Indonesia were disqualified before playing their first matches. Bhutan, South Sudan, Gibraltar and Kosovo made their FIFA World Cup qualification debuts.

The 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification process is a series of tournaments organised by the six FIFA confederations to decide 31 of the 32 teams which would play in the 2022 FIFA World Cup, with Qatar qualifying automatically as hosts. All 210 remaining FIFA member associations are eligible to enter the qualifying process.

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics association football played during the 2016 Olympic Summer Games

The association football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was held from 3 to 20 August in Brazil.

The association football tournament at the 2020 Summer Olympics will be held from 22 July to 8 August 2020 in Japan.

The European qualifying competition for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was a women's football competition that determined the eight UEFA teams joining the automatically qualified hosts France in the final tournament.