2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA play-offs

Last updated

The UEFA play-offs of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition involve the four runners-up with the best records among all seven groups in the qualifying group stage.

The European qualifying competition for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was a women's football competition that determined the eight UEFA teams joining the automatically qualified hosts France in the final tournament.

Contents

Ranking of second-placed teams

To determine the four best second-placed teams from the qualifying group stage which advance to the play-offs, only the results of the second-placed teams against the first, third and fourth-placed teams in their group are taken into account, while results against the fifth-placed team are not included. As a result, six matches played by each second-placed team will count for the purposes of determining the ranking.

PosGrpTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1 3 Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 6411162+1413 Play-offs
2 2 Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 6411135+813
3 6 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 641196+313
4 4 Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 6402177+1012
5 5 Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 632196+311
6 1 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 632153+211
7 7 Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 6312117+410
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) goals scored; 4) away goals scored; 5) disciplinary points; 6) coefficient.

Draw

The draw for the play-offs was held on 7 September 2018, 14:00 CEST (UTC+2), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland. [1] The four teams were drawn into two knockout rounds (semi-finals and final) of home-and-away two-legged format.

Central European Summer Time daylight savings time in the central european time zone

Central European Summer Time (CEST), sometime referred also as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time (UTC+01:00) during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+02:00, which makes it the same as Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.

UTC+02:00 Identifier for a time offset from UTC of +2

UTC+02:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of +02. In ISO 8601 the associated time would be written as 2019-02-07T23:28:34+02:00. This time is used in:

Nyon Place in Vaud, Switzerland

Nyon[njɔ̃] is a municipality in the district of Nyon in the canton of Vaud in Switzerland. It is located some 25 kilometers north east of Geneva's city centre, and since the 1970s it has become part of the Geneva metropolitan area. It lies on the shores of Lake Geneva and is the seat of the district of Nyon. The town has a population of 20,533 and is famous in the sporting world for being the headquarters of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) and the European Club Association (ECA). It is connected to the rest of Switzerland by way of the Route Suisse, the A1 Motorway and the railways of the Arc Lémanique.

For the semi-finals, two teams were seeded and two teams were unseeded, based on their latest coefficient ranking after the completion of the qualifying group stage, calculated based on the following: [2]

2015 FIFA Womens World Cup 2015 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was the seventh FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament was hosted by Canada for the first time and by a North American country for the third time. Matches were played in six cities across Canada in five time zones. The tournament began on 6 June 2015, and finished with the final on 5 July 2015 with a United States victory over Japan.

The European qualifying for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was a women's football tournament organized by UEFA. A record 46 entrants were competing for eight spots. For the first time Albania and Montenegro entered a senior competitive tournament. The first matches were held on 4 April 2013.

The UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying competition was a women's football competition that determined the 15 teams joining the automatically qualified hosts Netherlands in the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 final tournament.

Seeded
TeamCoeffRank
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 39,4304
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 37,0316
Unseeded
TeamCoeffRank
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 34,18511
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 32,73813

For each semi-final, a seeded team was drawn against an unseeded team, with the order of legs decided by draw. A draw was also held for the final between the two winners of the semi-finals to decide the order of legs.

Bracket

The play-off final winner qualifies for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

  Play-off semi-finals Play-off final
             
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 224 
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 011 
  Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 314
 Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 011
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 213
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland (a)213 

Play-off semi-finals

Overview

All times are CEST (UTC+2), as listed by UEFA.

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg4–1Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 2–0 2–1
Belgium  Flag of Belgium (civil).svg3–3 (a)Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 2–2 1–1

Matches

Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg2–0Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Report
Rat Verlegh Stadion, Breda
Attendance: 17,000
Referee: Kateryna Monzul (Ukraine)
Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg1–2Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Report
Viborg Stadium, Viborg
Attendance: 5,374
Referee: Sara Persson (Sweden)

Netherlands won 4–1 on aggregate.


Belgium  Flag of Belgium (civil).svg2–2Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Report
Den Dreef, Leuven
Attendance: 7,300
Referee: Anastasia Pustovoitova (Russia)
Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg1–1Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
Report
Tissot Arena, Biel/Bienne
Attendance: 2,650
Referee: Jana Adámková (Czech Republic)

3–3 on aggregate. Switzerland won on away goals.

Play-off final

Overview

The winner Netherlands qualifies for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. All times are CET (UTC+1), as listed by UEFA.

Central European Time standard time (UTC+01:00)

Central European Time (CET), used in most parts of Europe and a few North African countries, is a standard time which is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The time offset from UTC can be written as UTC+01:00. The same standard time, UTC+01:00, is also known as Middle European Time and under other names like Berlin Time, Warsaw Time and Romance Standard Time (RST), Paris Time or Rome Time.

UTC+01:00 Identifier for a time offset from UTC of +01:00

UTC+01:00, known simply as UTC+1, is a time offset that adds 1 hour to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). This time is used in:

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg4–1Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 3–0 1–1

Matches

Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg3–0Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Report
Stadion Galgenwaard, Utrecht
Attendance: 23,750
Referee: Pernilla Larsson (Sweden)
Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg1–1Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Report
LIPO Park, Schaffhausen
Attendance: 5,148
Referee: Stéphanie Frappart (France)

Netherlands won 4–1 on aggregate.

Goalscorers

There were 16 goals scored in 6 matches, for an average of 2.67 goals per match.

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

Related Research Articles

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA play-offs were a series of two-legged ties determining qualification for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. They involved the eight group winners from the first stage of European qualification.

UEFA Euro 2012 qualifying play-offs

The UEFA Euro 2012 qualifying play-off ties were played over two legs, with the first legs on 11 November and the second legs on 15 November 2011. The four winners are found according to the standard rules for the knockout phase in European competitions, and the winners qualified for the Euro 2012 tournament. Qualifying play-offs was a second stage (round) of UEFA Euro 2012 qualifying.

The play-offs of the UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying tournament decided the final four teams which qualified for the UEFA Euro 2016 final tournament. Eight teams, each of which finished third in their qualifying group were paired and contested in four ties, with the winner of each pair qualifying for the final tournament. Each of the four ties were played over two home-and-away legs with the four winners found according to the standard rules for the knockout phase in European competitions. The matches took place between 12 and 17 November 2015.

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA play-offs decided the eighth and final UEFA qualifier for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.

2017 UEFA Womens Under-19 Championship

The 2017 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship was the 16th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship, the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the women's under-19 national teams of Europe. Northern Ireland was selected by UEFA on 26 January 2015 as the host country for the tournament.

The UEFA Second Round was contested by the best eight runners-up from the nine first round groups from the UEFA segment of the qualification tournament for the 2018 FIFA World Cup final tournament. The winners — Croatia, Denmark, Sweden, and Switzerland — of each of four home and away ties joined the group winners in the World Cup in Russia. These pairs of matches, also commonly known as the playoffs, were held in November 2017. The losers were Greece, Italy, Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland.

UEFA Group 2 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Switzerland, Scotland, Poland, Belarus, and Albania. The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

UEFA Group 1 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: England, Russia, Wales, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Kazakhstan. The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

UEFA Group 3 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Norway, the Netherlands, the Republic of Ireland, Slovakia, and Northern Ireland. The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

UEFA Group 4 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Sweden, Denmark, Ukraine, Hungary, and Croatia. The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

UEFA Group 5 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Germany, Iceland, the Czech Republic, Slovenia, and the Faroe Islands. The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

UEFA Group 6 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Italy, Belgium, Romania, Portugal, and Moldova. The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

UEFA Group 7 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Spain, Austria, Finland, Serbia, and Israel. The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

The 2017–18 UEFA Champions League qualifying phase and play-off round began on 27 June and ended on 23 August 2017. A total of 57 teams competed in the qualifying phase and play-off round to decide 10 of the 32 places in the group stage of the 2017–18 UEFA Champions League.

The 2018–19 UEFA Nations League A is the top division of the 2018–19 edition of the UEFA Nations League, the inaugural season of the international football competition involving the men's national teams of the 55 member associations of UEFA. League A will culminate with the Nations League Finals in June 2019 to crown the inaugural champions of the UEFA Nations League.

The 2018–19 UEFA Nations League B was the second division of the 2018–19 edition of the UEFA Nations League, the inaugural season of the international football competition involving the men's national teams of the 55 member associations of UEFA.

The play-offs of the 2019 UEFA European Under-21 Championship qualifying competition involve the four runners-up with the best records among all nine groups in the qualifying group stage.

The 2018–19 UEFA Champions League qualifying phase and play-off round began on 26 June and ended on 29 August 2018.

The 2018–19 UEFA Women's Champions League knockout phase is scheduled to begin on 12 September 2018 and end on 18 May 2019 with the final at Groupama Arena in Budapest, Hungary, to decide the champions of the 2018–19 UEFA Women's Champions League. A total of 32 teams compete in the knockout phase.

References

  1. "Women's World Cup play-off draw". UEFA.com.
  2. "Women's national team coefficients: September 2018" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 5 September 2018. Retrieved 5 September 2018.