Alan Borg

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Alan Charles Nelson Borg CBE FSA KStJ FRHistS (born 21 January 1942) is a former director of the Victoria and Albert Museum and Librarian of the Order of St John.

Victoria and Albert Museum Art museum in London

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London is the world's largest museum of applied and decorative arts and design, as well as sculpture, housing a permanent collection of over 2.27 million objects. It was founded in 1852 and named after Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

Order of Saint John (chartered 1888) British royal order of chivalry constituted in 1888

The Order of St John, formally The Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem and also known as St John International, is a British royal order of chivalry first constituted in 1888 by royal charter from Queen Victoria.

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He was educated at Westminster School before Brasenose College, Oxford (MA) and the Courtauld Institute of Art (PhD).

Westminster School School in Westminster, UK

Westminster School is a Public School in London, England, located within the precincts of Westminster Abbey. Westminster’s origins can be traced to a charity school established by the Benedictine monks of Westminster Abbey. Its continuous existence is certain from the early fourteenth century. Boys are admitted to the Under School at age seven and to the senior school at age thirteen; girls are admitted at age sixteen into the Sixth Form. The school has around 750 pupils; around a quarter are boarders, most of whom go home at weekends, after Saturday morning school. The school motto, Dat Deus Incrementum, is taken from the New Testament, specifically 1 Corinthians 3:6.

Brasenose College, Oxford college of the University of Oxford

Brasenose College (BNC), officially The King's Hall and College of Brasenose, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. It was founded in 1509, with the library and chapel added in the mid-17th century and the new quadrangle in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

A Master of Arts is a person who was admitted to a type of master's degree awarded by universities in many countries, and the degree is also named Master of Arts in colloquial speech. The degree is usually contrasted with the Master of Science. Those admitted to the degree typically study linguistics, history, communication studies, diplomacy, public administration, political science, or other subjects within the scope of the humanities and social sciences; however, different universities have different conventions and may also offer the degree for fields typically considered within the natural sciences and mathematics. The degree can be conferred in respect of completing courses and passing examinations, research, or a combination of the two.

Having begun his career at the Tower of London's Royal Armouries, in 1978, he became the first Director of the University of East Anglia's Sainsbury Centre for the Visual Arts. He was then appointed Director-General of the Imperial War Museum, [1] before being Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum from 1995 to 2001. [2]

Tower of London A historic castle on the north bank of the River Thames in central London

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 until 1952, although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under kings Richard I, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site.

Royal Armouries national museum of arms and armour of the United Kingdom, located at the Tower of London

The Royal Armouries is the United Kingdom's National Museum of Arms and Armour. It is the United Kingdom's oldest museum, originally housed in the Tower of London from the 15th century, and one of the oldest museums in the world. It is also one of the oldest and largest collections of arms and armour in the world, comprising the UK's National Collection of Arms and Armour, National Artillery Collection, and National Firearms Collection. Its historic base is in the Tower of London, but today the collection is split across three sites:

University of East Anglia Public research university in Norwich, England

The University of East Anglia (UEA) is a public research university in Norwich, England. Established in 1963 on a 320 acres campus west of the city centre, the university has four faculties and 26 schools of study. The annual income of the institution for 2016–17 was £273.7 million of which £35.6 million was from research grants and contracts, with an expenditure of £262.6 million.

Borg is currently the Order of St John Librarian and a Vice-President of the Foundling Museum. [1]

Foundling Museum Art gallery, Museum in London

The Foundling Museum in Brunswick Square, London tells the story of the Foundling Hospital, Britain's first home for children at risk of abandonment. The museum houses the nationally important Foundling Hospital Collection as well as the Gerald Coke Handel Collection, an internationally important collection of material relating to Handel and his contemporaries. After a major building refurbishment the museum opened to the public in June 2004.

Works

Leonard (Leo) Cooper worked for numerous distinguished publishing houses before setting up his own independent publishing house, Leo Cooper Ltd, in 1968.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

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Osterley Park park and historic house museum in London

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Art Fund organization

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References

  1. 1 2 "Dr Alan Borg". Swanhellenic.com. Archived from the original on 26 July 2014. Retrieved 24 July 2014.
  2. "V&A directors past and present" . Retrieved 23 July 2014.