Andy Ashby

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Andy Ashby
Andy Ashby.jpg
Pitcher
Born: (1967-07-11) July 11, 1967 (age 51)
Kansas City, Missouri
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
June 10, 1991, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
September 14, 2004, for the San Diego Padres
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 98–110
Earned run average 4.12
Strikeouts 1,173
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Andrew Jason Ashby (born July 11, 1967) is a former Major League Baseball starting pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Phillies, Colorado Rockies, San Diego Padres, Atlanta Braves, and Los Angeles Dodgers. Listed at 6' 1", 180 lb., Ashby batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Kansas City, Missouri.

Major League Baseball Professional baseball league

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization, the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901 respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

Starting pitcher baseball or softball pitcher who throws the first pitch for their team in a game

In baseball, a starting pitcher or starter is the first pitcher in the game for each team. A pitcher is credited with a game started if they throw the first pitch to the opponent's first batter of a game. A pitcher who enters the game after the first pitch of the game is a relief pitcher. Starting pitchers are expected to pitch for a significant portion of the game, although their ability to do this depends on many factors, including effectiveness, stamina, health, and strategy.

Philadelphia Phillies Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

The Philadelphia Phillies are an American professional baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Phillies compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) East division. Since 2004, the team's home has been Citizens Bank Park, located in South Philadelphia.

Contents

Career

Ashby attended Park Hill High School in Kansas City and played baseball with the Crowder Roughriders at Crowder College. He was signed as an undrafted free agent in 1986 by the Phillies, with whom he made his Major League debut in 1991.

Park Hill High School is one of two high schools in the Park Hill School District, in Kansas City. The school is located in northern Kansas City, in Platte County.

Crowder College is a two-year community college serving the Community College District of Newton and McDonald counties in southwestern Missouri and other outlying areas. Established in 1963 on the grounds of the former Fort Crowder, the college grants certificates, diplomas, and associate's degrees. The name honors General Enoch Crowder, a prominent Missourian, soldier, and statesman, as well as the veterans of World War I, who received their training at Fort Crowder. The Longwell Museum, located in the Crowder College Elsie Plaster Community Center, has many displays and artifacts from the Fort Crowder days, when over 50,000 soldiers were stationed there.

In professional sports, a free agent is a player who is eligible to freely sign with any club or franchise; i.e., not under contract to any specific team. The term is also used in reference to a player who is under contract at present but who is allowed to solicit offers from other teams. In some circumstances, the free agent's options are limited by league rules.

On June 15, 1991, Ashby struck out three batters on nine pitches in the fourth inning of a 3–1 loss to the Cincinnati Reds; [1] Ashby became the 15th National League pitcher and the 24th pitcher in Major League history to accomplish the nine-strike/three-strikeout half-inning. He was acquired by the Colorado Rockies in the 1993 expansion draft, but after compiling an 0–4 record with an 8.50 ERA, he was dealt to the San Diego Padres at the end of the season. [2]

Cincinnati Reds Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

The Cincinnati Reds are an American professional baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Reds compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. They were a charter member of the American Association in 1882 and joined the NL in 1890.

National League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, known simply as the National League (NL), is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada, and the world's oldest current professional team sports league. Founded on February 2, 1876, to replace the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players (NAPBBP) of 1871–1875,, the NL is sometimes called the Senior Circuit, in contrast to MLB's other league, the American League, which was founded 25 years later.

Earned run average

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors are recorded as unearned runs and omitted from ERA calculations.

Despite injuries to his shoulder, elbow and back, Ashby saw the greatest success of his career with the Padres. His most productive season came in 1998, when he helped the Padres reach the World Series with a 17–9 record and a 3.34 ERA. He was also a member of the 1998 and 1999 National League All-Star team. In eight seasons with the Padres, Ashby compiled a 70–62 record with a 3.59 ERA.

1998 World Series 1998 Major League Baseball championship series

The 1998 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 1998 season. The 94th edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the American League (AL) champion New York Yankees and the National League (NL) champion San Diego Padres. The Yankees swept the Series in four games to win their second World Series championship in three years and their 24th overall. Yankees third baseman Scott Brosius was named the World Series Most Valuable Player.

Prior to the 2000 season, the Padres dealt him to the Phillies, the team with whom his career began. Ashby had been touted as a potential ace for the struggling Phillies pitching staff. However, he pitched poorly, going 4–7 with a 5.68 ERA. He was sent to the Atlanta Braves midseason, where he helped the team reach the playoffs with an 8–6 record and a 4.13 ERA. [2]

Ashby spent the next three years with the Los Angeles Dodgers, going 14–23 while posting a 4.31 ERA. At the end of 2003, he underwent Tommy John surgery. He made a brief two game return stint as a reliever with San Diego in 2004 and was signed by the team before the 2006 season, but retired. [2]

Relief pitcher baseball or softball pitcher who relieves a previous pitcher

In baseball and softball, a relief pitcher or reliever is a pitcher who enters the game after the starting pitcher is removed due to injury, ineffectiveness, fatigue, ejection, or for other strategic reasons, such as inclement weather delays or pinch hitter substitutions. Relief pitchers are further divided informally into various roles, such as closers, setup men, middle relief pitchers, left/right-handed specialists, and long relievers. Whereas starting pitchers usually rest several days before pitching in a game again due to the number of pitches thrown, relief pitchers are expected to be more flexible and typically pitch more games but with fewer innings pitched. A team's staff of relievers is normally referred to metonymically as a team's bullpen, which refers to the area where the relievers sit during games, and where they warm-up prior to entering the game.

In a 14-season career, Ashby posted a 98–110 record with 1173 strikeouts and a 4.12 ERA in 1810 innings pitched.

Since 2013, Ashby has done work as a TV Analyst for Fox Sports San Diego on Padres games. [3] He and his family maintain homes in San Diego and Pennsylvania. [3]

Personal life

Ashby married Tracy Tigue on February 6, 1993 and the couple have four daughters.[ citation needed ] His nephew, Aaron, is also a baseball player and was taken in the 4th round of the 2018 MLB draft the Milwaukee Brewers. [4]

See also

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