Baron Rodney

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Arms of the Barons Rodney. Baron Rodney coa.png
Arms of the Barons Rodney.

Baron Rodney, of Rodney Stoke in the County of Somerset, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1782 for the naval commander Sir George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baronet. He had previously been created a Baronet, of Alresford in the County of Southampton, in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 22 January 1764. His son, the second Baron, represented Northampton in Parliament. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the third Baron. He served as Lord Lieutenant of Radnorshire. His younger brother, the fourth Baron, assumed by Royal licence the additional surname of Harley in 1804. On his death the titles passed to his younger brother, the fifth Baron. He was Rector of Elmley in Kent. He was succeeded by his nephew, the sixth Baron. He was the son of Captain the Hon. Robert Rodney, fourth son of the second Baron. The sixth Baron's great-grandson, the ninth Baron, was an active member of the House of Lords and served as a Delegate to the Council of Europe and the Western European Union. As of 2011 the titles are held by the latter's grandson, the eleventh Baron, who succeeded in 2011.

Contents

Barons Rodney (1782)

The present heir presumptive to the barony is Nicholas Simon Harley Rodney (b. 1947), a great-great-grandson of the 6th Baron
The heir presumptive's heir is his brother Christopher Lossie Charles Rodney (b. 1957)
The next in line is the heir presumptive's first cousin David James Rodney (b. 1965). His heir is his elder son Harry John Melville Rodney (b. 1992)

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