Peerage of Great Britain

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The Peerage of Great Britain comprises all extant peerages created in the Kingdom of Great Britain after the Acts of Union 1707 but before the Acts of Union 1800. It replaced the Peerage of England and the Peerage of Scotland until it was itself replaced by the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1801.

A peerage is a legal system historically comprising hereditary titles in various countries, comprising various noble ranks.

Kingdom of Great Britain Constitutional monarchy in Western Europe between 1707–1801

The Kingdom of Great Britain, officially called simply Great Britain, was a sovereign state in western Europe from 1 May 1707 to 31 December 1800. The state came into being following the Treaty of Union in 1706, ratified by the Acts of Union 1707, which united the kingdoms of England and Scotland to form a single kingdom encompassing the whole island of Great Britain and its outlying islands, with the exception of the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. The unitary state was governed by a single parliament and government that was based in Westminster. The former kingdoms had been in personal union since James VI of Scotland became King of England and King of Ireland in 1603 following the death of Elizabeth I, bringing about the "Union of the Crowns". After the accession of George I to the throne of Great Britain in 1714, the kingdom was in a personal union with the Electorate of Hanover.

Acts of Union 1707 Acts of Parliament creating the United Kingdom of Great Britain

The Acts of Union were two Acts of Parliament: the Union with Scotland Act 1706 passed by the Parliament of England, and the Union with England Act passed in 1707 by the Parliament of Scotland. They put into effect the terms of the Treaty of Union that had been agreed on 22 July 1706, following negotiation between commissioners representing the parliaments of the two countries. By the two Acts, the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland—which at the time were separate states with separate legislatures, but with the same monarch—were, in the words of the Treaty, "United into One Kingdom by the Name of Great Britain".

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The ranks of the Peerage of Great Britain are Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount and Baron. Until the passage of the House of Lords Act 1999, all Peers of Great Britain could sit in the House of Lords.

A duke (male) or duchess (female) can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of royalty or nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch. The title comes from French duc, itself from the Latin dux, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank, and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province.

A marquess is a nobleman of high hereditary rank in various European peerages and in those of some of their former colonies. The term is also used to translate equivalent Asian styles, as in Imperial China and Imperial Japan.

An earl is a member of the nobility. The title is Anglo-Saxon in origin, akin to the Scandinavian form jarl, and meant "chieftain", particularly a chieftain set to rule a territory in a king's stead. In Scandinavia, it became obsolete in the Middle Ages and was replaced by duke (hertig/hertug/hertog). In later medieval Britain, it became the equivalent of the continental count. However, earlier in Scandinavia, jarl could also mean a sovereign prince. For example, the rulers of several of the petty kingdoms of Norway had the title of jarl and in many cases they had no less power than their neighbours who had the title of king. Alternative names for the rank equivalent to "earl/count" in the nobility structure are used in other countries, such as the hakushaku of the post-restoration Japanese Imperial era.

In the following table of peers of Great Britain, higher or equal titles in the other peerages are listed. Those peers who are known by a higher title in one of the other peerages are listed in italics.

Dukes in the Peerage of Great Britain

TitleCreationOther Dukedom or higher titlesMonarch
The Duke of Brandon 10 September 1711Created for the Duke of Hamilton in the Peerage of Scotland to sit in the House of Lords . Queen Anne
The Duke of Manchester 28 April 1719 King George I
The Duke of Northumberland 22 October 1766 King George III

Marquesses in the Peerage of Great Britain

TitleCreationOther Marquisette or higher titlesMonarch
The Marquess of Lansdowne 6 December 1784 King George III
The Marquess of Stafford 1 March 1786 Duke of Sutherland in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Marquess Townshend 31 October 1787
The Marquess of Salisbury 18 August 1789 Lord Gascoyne-Cecil for Life in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The Marquess of Bath 24 August 1789
The Marquess of Abercorn 15 October 1790 Duke of Abercorn in the Peerage of Ireland .
The Marquess of Hertford 5 July 1793
The Marquess of Bute 21 March 1796

Earls in the Peerage of Great Britain

TitleCreationOther Earldom or higher titlesMonarch
The Earl Ferrers 3 September 1711 Queen Anne
The Earl of Dartmouth 5 September 1711
The Earl of Tankerville 19 October 1714 King George I
The Earl of Aylesford 19 October 1714
The Earl of Bristol 19 October 1714 Marquess of Bristol in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Earl of Macclesfield 15 November 1721
The Earl Graham of Belford 23 May 1722Held by the Duke of Montrose in the Peerage of Scotland since 1742.
The Earl Waldegrave 13 September 1729 King George II
The Earl of Harrington 9 February 1742
The Earl of Portsmouth 11 April 1743
The Earl Brooke 7 July 1746
The Earl Gower 8 July 1746 Duke of Sutherland in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Earl of Buckinghamshire 5 September 1746
The Earl of Northumberland 2 October 1749Held by the Duke of Northumberland in the Peerage of the Great Britain since 1766.
The Earl of Hertford 3 August 1750 Marquess of Hertford in the Peerage of the Great Britain.
The Earl of Guilford 8 April 1752
The Earl of Hardwicke 2 April 1754
The Earl of Ilchester 17 June 1756
The Earl of Warwick 30 November 1759Held with the Earl Brooke in the Peerage of Great Britain since 1759.
The Earl De La Warr 18 March 1761 King George III
The Earl of Radnor 31 October 1765
The Earl Spencer 1 November 1765
The Earl Bathurst 27 August 1772
The Earl of Hillsborough 28 August 1772 Marquess of Downshire in the Peerage of Ireland .
The Earl of Ailesbury 10 June 1776 Marquess of Ailesbury in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Earl of Clarendon 14 June 1776
The Earl of Mansfield 31 October 1776 Earl of Mansfield in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Earl of Uxbridge 19 April 1784 Marquess of Anglesey in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Earl of Abergavenny 17 May 1784 Marquess of Abergavenny in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Earl Talbot 3 July 1784Held by the Earl of Shrewsbury in the Peerage of England since 1858.
The Earl Grosvenor 5 July 1784 Duke of Westminster in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Earl Camden 13 May 1786 Marquess Camden in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Earl of Mount Edgcumbe 31 August 1789
The Earl Fortescue 1 September 1789
The Earl of Beverley 2 November 1790Held by the Duke of Northumberland in the Peerage of the Great Britain since 1865.
The Earl of Mansfield 1 August 1792Held with the Earl of Mansfield in the Peerage of Great Britain since 1843.
The Earl of Carnarvon 3 July 1793
The Earl Cadogan 27 December 1800
The Earl of Malmesbury 29 December 1800

Viscounts in the Peerage of Great Britain

TitleCreationOther Viscountcy or higher titlesMonarch
The Viscount Bolingbroke 7 July 1712 Viscount St John in the Peerage of Great Britain. Queen Anne
The Viscount St John 2 July 1716Held with Viscount Bolingbroke in the Peerage of Great Britain since 1751. King George I
The Viscount Stanhope 2 July 1717Held by the Earl of Harrington in the Peerage of Great Britain since 1967.
The Viscount Cobham 23 May 1718
The Viscount Falmouth 9 June 1720
The Viscount Torrington 21 September 1721
The Viscount Folkestone 29 June 1747 Earl of Radnor in the Peerage of Great Britain. King George II
The Viscount Leinster 21 September 1747 Duke of Leinster in the Peerage of Ireland .
The Viscount Spencer 3 April 1761 Earl Spencer in the Peerage of the Great Britain. King George III
The Viscount Mount Edgcumbe and Valletort 5 March 1781 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe in the Peerage of the Great Britain.
The Viscount Hamilton 8 August 1786 Duke of Abercorn in the Peerage of Ireland .
The Viscount Hood 1 June 1796
The Viscount Lowther 26 October 1796 Earl of Lonsdale in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .

Barons in the Peerage of Great Britain

TitleCreationOther Barony or higher titlesMonarch
The Lord Boyle of Marston 5 September 1711Created for the Earl of Orrery in the Peerage of Ireland to sit in the House of Lords . Queen Anne
The Lord Hay of Penwardine 31 December 1711Held by the Earl of Kinnoull in the Peerage of Scotland since 1719.
The Lord Bathurst 1 January 1712 Earl Bathurst in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Middleton 1 January 1712
The Lord Parker 10 March 1716 Earl of Macclesfield in the Peerage of Great Britain. King George I
The Lord Onslow 19 June 1716 Earl of Onslow in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Romney 22 June 1716 Earl of Romney in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Newburgh 10 July 1716 Marquess of Cholmondeley in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Cadogan 8 May 1718 Earl Cadogan in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Percy 21 January 1722Held by the Duke of Northumberland in the Peerage of Great Britain since 1957.
The Lord Walpole 1 June 1723 Lord Walpole in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Hobart 28 May 1728 Earl of Buckinghamshire in the Peerage of Great Britain. King George II
The Lord Monson 28 May 1728
The Lord Harrington 6 January 1730 Earl of Harrington in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Hardwicke 23 November 1733 Earl of Hardwicke in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Talbot of Hensol 17 December 1733 Earl of Shrewsbury in the Peerage of England .
The Lord Ilchester 11 May 1741 Earl of Ilchester in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Strangways 11 May 1741 Earl of Ilchester in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Edgcumbe 20 April 1742 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe in the Peerage of the Great Britain.
The Lord Bruce of Tottenham 17 April 1746 Marquess of Ailesbury in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Fortescue 17 April 1746 Earl Fortescue in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Ilchester and Stavordale 12 January 1747 Earl of Ilchester in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Ponsonby of Sysonby 12 June 1749Created for the Earl of Bessborough in the Peerage of Ireland to sit in the House of Lords .
The Lord Vere of Hanworth 28 March 1750Held by the Duke of St Albans in the Peerage of England since 1787.
The Lord Hyde 3 June 1756 Earl of Clarendon in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Walpole 4 June 1756Held by the Lord Walpole in the Peerage of Great Britain since 1931.
The Lord Harwich 17 November 1756 Marquess of Downshire in the Peerage of Ireland .
The Lord Wycombe 17 May 1760 Marquess of Lansdowne in the Peerage of Great Britian.
The Lord Mount Stuart of Wortley 3 April 1761 Marquess of Bute in the Peerage of Great Britain. King George III
The Lord Spencer of Althorp 3 April 1761 Earl Spencer in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Grosvenor 8 April 1761 Duke of Westminster in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Scarsdale 9 April 1761Held with Viscount Scarsdale in the Peerage of the United Kingdom since 1911.
The Lord Boston 10 April 1761
The Lord Pelham of Stanmer 4 May 1762 Earl of Chichester in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Vernon 12 May 1762
The Lord Ducie 17 April 1763 Earl of Ducie in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Camden 17 July 1765 Marquess Camden in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Digby 19 August 1765Created for the Lord Digby in the Peerage of Ireland to sit in the House of Lords .
The Lord Sundridge 22 December 1766Held by the Duke of Argyll in the Peerage of Scotland since 1770.
The Lord Apsley 24 January 1771Held by the Earl Bathurst in the Peerage of Great Britain since 1775.
The Lord Brownlow 20 May 1776
The Lord Cranley 20 May 1776 Earl of Onslow in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Cardiff 20 May 1776 Marquess of Bute in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Foley 20 May 1776
The Lord Hamilton of Hameldon 20 May 1776Held by the Duke of Argyll in the Peerage of Scotland since 1806.
The Lord Harrowby 20 May 1776 Earl of Harrowby in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Hawke 20 May 1776
The Lord Bagot 12 October 1780
The Lord Dynevor 17 October 1780
The Lord Porchester 17 October 1780 Earl of Carnarvon in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Southampton 17 September 1780
The Lord Walsingham 17 October 1780
The Lord Grantley 9 April 1782
The Lord Rodney 19 June 1782
The Lord Lovaine 28 January 1784 Duke of Northumberland in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Somers 17 May 1784
The Lord Boringdon 18 May 1784 Earl of Morley in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Eliot 13 June 1784 Earl of St Germans in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Carleton 21 August 1786Created for the Earl of Shannon in the Peerage of Ireland to sit in the House of Lords .
The Lord Suffield 21 August 1786
The Lord Tyrone 21 August 1786 Marquess of Waterford in the Peerage of Ireland .
The Lord Kenyon 9 June 1788
The Lord Howe 19 August 1788 Earl Howe in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Braybrooke 5 September 1788
The Lord Howe 19 September 1788 Earl of Malmesbury in the Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Fisherwick 3 July 1790 Marquess of Donegall in the Peerage of Ireland .
The Lord Verulam 6 July 1790 Earl of Verulam in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Gage 1 November 1790Created for the Viscount Gage in the Peerage of Ireland to sit in the House of Lords .
The Lord Thurlow 11 June 1792
The Lord Auckland 22 May 1793Created for the Lord Auckland in the Peerage of Ireland to sit in the House of Lords.
The Lord Bradford 13 August 1794 Earl of Bradford in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Clive 13 August 1794 Earl of Powis in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Curzon 13 August 1794 Earl Howe in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Dundas 13 August 1794 Marquess of Zetland in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Lyttelton 13 August 1794Held by the Viscount Cobham in the Peerage of Great Britain since 1889.
The Lord Mendip 13 August 1794Held by the Earl of Normanton in the Peerage of Ireland since 1974.
The Lord Mulgrave 13 August 1794 Marquess of Normanby in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Yarborough 13 August 1794 Earl of Yarborough in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Hood 27 May 1795 Viscount Hood in Peerage of Great Britain.
The Lord Loughborough 31 October 1795 Earl of Rosslyn in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Rous 28 May 1796 Earl of Stradbroke in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Brodrick 1 June 1796Created for the Viscount Midleton in the Peerage of Ireland to sit in the House of Lords .
The Lord Stuart 4 June 1796Created for the Earl of Moray in the Peerage of Scotland to sit in the House of Lords .
The Lord Stewart of Garlies 6 June 1796Created for the Earl of Galloway in the Peerage of Scotland to sit in the House of Lords .
The Lord Saltersford 7 June 1796Created for the Earl of Courtown in the Peerage of Ireland to sit in the House of Lords .
The Lord Harewood 18 June 1796 Earl of Harewood in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Cawdor 21 June 1796 Earl Cawdor in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Bolton 20 October 1797
The Lord Carrington 20 October 1797Created for the Baron Carrington in the Peerage of Ireland to sit in the House of Lords.
The Lord Minto 20 October 1797 Earl of Minto in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Lilford 26 October 1797
The Lord Wodehouse 26 October 1797 Earl of Kimberley in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .
The Lord Eldon 18 July 1799 Earl of Eldon in the Peerage of the United Kingdom .

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