Nottinghamshire (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Nottinghamshire
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
County Nottinghamshire
1290–1832
Number of membersTwo
Replaced by North Nottinghamshire and South Nottinghamshire

Nottinghamshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Members of Parliament (MPs), traditionally known as Knights of the Shire.

House of Commons of the United Kingdom Lower house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Commons, officially the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Owing to shortage of space, its office accommodation extends into Portcullis House.

Parliament of England historic legislature of the Kingdom of England

The Parliament of England was the legislature of the Kingdom of England, existing from the early 13th century until 1707, when it united with the Parliament of Scotland to become the Parliament of Great Britain after the political union of England and Scotland created the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Parliament of Great Britain parliament from 1714 to 1800

The Parliament of Great Britain was formed in 1707 following the ratification of the Acts of Union by both the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. The Acts created a new unified Kingdom of Great Britain and dissolved the separate English and Scottish parliaments in favour of a single parliament, located in the former home of the English parliament in the Palace of Westminster, near the City of London. This lasted nearly a century, until the Acts of Union 1800 merged the separate British and Irish Parliaments into a single Parliament of the United Kingdom with effect from 1 January 1801.

Contents

The constituency was split into two two-member divisions, for Parliamentary purposes, by the Reform Act 1832. The county was then represented by the North Nottinghamshire and South Nottinghamshire constituencies.

Reform Act 1832 United Kingdom legislation

The Representation of the People Act 1832 was an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom that introduced wide-ranging changes to the electoral system of England and Wales. According to its preamble, the Act was designed to "take effectual Measures for correcting divers Abuses that have long prevailed in the Choice of Members to serve in the Commons House of Parliament". Before the reform, most members nominally represented boroughs. The number of electors in a borough varied widely, from a dozen or so up to 12,000. Frequently the selection of MPs was effectively controlled by one powerful patron: for example Charles Howard, 11th Duke of Norfolk, controlled eleven boroughs. Criteria for qualification for the franchise varied greatly among boroughs, from the requirement to own land, to merely living in a house with a hearth sufficient to boil a pot.

North Nottinghamshire, formally the "Northern Division of Nottinghamshire" was a county constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) by the block vote system of election.

South Nottinghamshire, formally the "Southern Division of Nottinghamshire" was a county constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) by the bloc vote system of election.

Boundaries

The county of Nottinghamshire is located in the East Midlands of England. The county is known to have been represented in Parliament from 1290, although it probably sent knights of the shire to earlier meetings.

Nottinghamshire County of England

Nottinghamshire is a county in the East Midlands region of England, bordering South Yorkshire to the north-west, Lincolnshire to the east, Leicestershire to the south, and Derbyshire to the west. The traditional county town is Nottingham, though the county council is based at County Hall in West Bridgford in the borough of Rushcliffe, at a site facing Nottingham over the River Trent.

East Midlands region of England in United Kingdom

The East Midlands is one of nine official regions of England at the first level of NUTS for statistical purposes. It consists of Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire and Rutland. The region has an area of 15,627 km2 (6,034 sq mi), with a population over 4.5 million in 2011. There are six main urban centres, Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Mansfield, Northampton and Nottingham. Others include Boston, Skegness, Chesterfield, Corby, Grantham, Hinckley, Kettering, Loughborough, Newark-on-Trent and Wellingborough.

From 1295 the county and the town of Nottingham each returned two members to parliament. In 1572 East Retford was represented by two members, and in 1672 Newark-upon-Trent also. Under the Reform Act of 1832 the county returned four members in two divisions. By the act of 1885 it returned four members in four divisions; Newark and East Retford were disfranchised, and Nottingham returned three members in three divisions.

Nottingham was a parliamentary borough in Nottinghamshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1295. In 1885 the constituency was abolished and the city of Nottingham divided into three single-member constituencies.

East Retford was a parliamentary constituency in Nottinghamshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons for the first time in 1316, and continuously from 1571 until 1885, when the constituency was abolished. Although East Retford was technically a parliamentary borough for the whole of its existence, in 1830 its franchise had been widened and its boundaries had been extended to include the whole Wapentake of Bassetlaw as a remedy for corruption among the voters, and from that point onward it resembled a county constituency in most respects.

Newark (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885 onwards

Newark is a constituency in Nottinghamshire, England. It is currently represented by Robert Jenrick of the Conservative Party who won the seat in a by-election on 5 June 2014, following the resignation of Patrick Mercer in April 2014.

Members of Parliament

1290–1640

1305 Sir Hugh de Hercy and Thomas Malet

1316 Sir Hugh de Hercy and Lawrence Chaworth

ParliamentFirst memberSecond member
1297 Sir John de Vilers
1307 Sir Walter Goushill of Hoveringham
1311 Sir Walter Goushill of Hoveringham
1312 John de Lisours
1313 Laurencius de Cadurcis
1318 Sir Richard II Willoughby [1] Peter Foun [1]
1320 John Darcy
1324 Robert de Jorce [1] Sir Richard III Willoughby [1]
1361–1393 Robert Morton
1373 John Gateford
1376–1390 Sir John Burton (5 times)
1377–1388 John Annesley
1378 Sir John Leake
1378 William Neville
1379 Sir John Birmingham
1380 (Nov) John Gateford
1381 Sir Thomas Rempston
1383 Sir Thomas Rempston
1386 Sir John Annesley Sir John Leake [2]
1388 (Feb) Sir John Annesley Sir John Leake [2]
1388 (Sep) Sir John Annesley Sir Robert Cockfield [2]
1390 (Jan) John Gateford Sir John Leake [2]
1390 (Nov) Sir John Burton Hugh Cressy [2]
1391 Sir Thomas Hercy Sir Robert Cockfield [2]
1393 Sir Thomas Rempston John Gateford [2]
1394 Sir William Neville Nicholas Strelley [2]
1395 Sir Thomas Rempston Nicholas Burdon [2]
1397 (Jan) Sir Thomas Rempston Hugh Cressy [2]
1397 (Sep) Sir Thomas Rempston Robert Morton [2]
1399 William Leek John Gateford [2]
1401 Sir John Burton (son of Sir John, 1376) John Kniveton [2]
1402 Sir John Clifton Sir Richard Stanhope [2]
1404 (Jan) John Leek Sir Richard Stanhope [2]
1404 (Oct) Simon Leek Sir Richard Stanhope [2]
1406 Sir Thomas Chaworth Sir Richard Stanhope [2]
1407 Sir John Zouche Sir Hugh Hussey [2]
1410
1411 William Rigmaiden Thomas Staunton [2]
1413 (Feb)
1413 (May) Sir John Zouche Sir Thomas Rempston II [2]
1413 (Apr) Sir Robert Plumpton Henry Sutton [2]
1414 (Nov) Ralph Mackerell Sir Hugh Hussey [2]
1415
1416 (Mar) William Compton Sir Thomas Rempston II [2]
1416 (Oct)
1417 Sir Thomas Chaworth Sir Henry Pierrepont [2]
1419 Sir John Zouche Ralph Hussey [2]
1420 Sir Thomas Chaworth Ralph Mackerell [2]
1421 (May) Sir Thomas Chaworth Sir William Mering [2]
1421 (Dec) Sir Henry Pierrepont Sir Richard Stanhope [2]
1422 Sir John Zouche
1423 Sir Henry Pierrepont Sir Thomas Chaworth
1425 Sir Henry Pierrepont Sir William Mering
1427 Ralph Mackerell [3]
1429 John Bowes
1432 John Bowes
1435 John Bowes
1436 William Plumpton
1437 Sir Thomas Chaworth
1439 John Bowes
1442 Sir William Mering Sir John Zouche
1445 Sir Thomas Chaworth
1510–1523No names known [4]
1529 Sir John Markham Sir John Byron [4]
1536
1539 Gervase Clifton John Hercy [4]
1542
1545 Sir Anthony Neville Michael Stanhope [4]
1547 Sir Michael Stanhope Sir John Markham [4]
1553 (Mar) William Mering George Lascelles [4]
1553 (Oct) Sir John Hercy Sir William Holles [4]
1554 (Apr) Sir John Constable Ellis Markham [4]
1554 (Nov) Richard Whalley Ellis Markham [4]
1555 Richard Whalley Anthony Forster [4]
1558 Sir John Markham Hugh Thornhill [4]
1559 (Jan)(writ) Sir John Markham John Manners [5]
1562–1563 John Manners John Molyneux [5]
1571 Robert Markham Edward Stanhope [5]
1572 Henry Pierrepont Edward Stanhope [5]
1584 (Nov) Sir Thomas Manners Sir Robert Constable [5]
1586 Sir Thomas Manners Sir Thomas Stanhope [5]
1588 (Oct) Robert Markham Brian Lascelles [5]
1593 (Jan) Sir Charles Cavendish Philip Strelley [5]
1597 (Oct) John Byron Richard Whalley [5]
1601 (Oct) Sir Charles Cavendish Robert Pierrepont [5]
1604–1611 Sir John Holles Percival Willoughby
Addled Parliament (1614) Sir Gervase Clifton
1621–1622 George Chaworth, 1st Viscount Chaworth
Happy Parliament (1624) Robert Sutton
Useless Parliament (1625) Sir Henry Stanhope
1626 Sir Henry Stanhope Sir Thomas Hutchinson
1628 Sir John Byron Sir Gervase Clifton
No Parliament summoned 1629–1640

1640–1832

YearFirst memberFirst partySecond memberSecond party
April 1640 Sir Thomas Hutchinson Parliamentarian Robert Sutton Royalist
November 1640 Sir Thomas Hutchinson Parliamentarian Robert Sutton Royalist
August 1643Hutchinson died – seat vacant
December 1643Sutton disabled to sit – seat vacant
1645 John Hutchinson Gervase Pigot
1653 John Oddingsels Edward Cludd
1654Representation increased to four members in First and Second Parliaments of the Protectorate
1654 Hon. William Pierrepont, Major-General Edward Whalley, Colonel Edward Neville, Charles White
1656 Edward Cludd, Major-General Edward Whalley, Colonel Edward Neville, Peniston Whalley
1659Representation reverted to two members in Third Parliaments of the Protectorate
January 1659 Colonel Edward Neville Martin Bristow
May 1659 Colonel John Hutchinson One seat vacant
March 1660 Lord Houghton Hon. William Pierrepont
1661 Anthony Eyre Sir Gervase Clifton
1666 Sir Francis Leke
1673 Sir Scrope Howe
1679 John White
1685 Sir William Clifton, 3rd Baronet Reason Mellish
January 1689 Sir Scrope Howe Lord Houghton
May 1689 John White
1690 William Sacheverell
1691 John White
1698 Sir Thomas Willoughby Gervase Eyre
1701 Sir Francis Molyneux
1702 Gervase Eyre
1704 John Thornhagh
1705 Sir Thomas Willoughby
1710 The Viscount Howe William Levinz Tory
1713 Hon. Francis Willoughby Tory
1722 The Viscount Howe Whig Sir Robert Sutton Whig
1732 William Levinz Tory Thomas Bennett Non Partisan
1734 William Levinz (junior) Non Partisan
1739 Hon. John Mordaunt Non Partisan
1747 Colonel Lord Robert Sutton
(Lord Robert Manners-Sutton)
Non Partisan John Thornhagh
(John Hewett)
[6]
Non Partisan
1762 Hon. Thomas Willoughby Non Partisan
1774 Earl of Lincoln Non Partisan
1775 Lord Edward Bentinck Non Partisan
1778 Charles Medows
(Charles Pierrepont)
[7]
Non Partisan
1796 Lord William Bentinck [8] Whig Hon. Evelyn Pierrepont Non Partisan
1801 Hon. Charles Pierrepont
(Viscount Newark)
[9]
Non Partisan
1803 Anthony Hardolph Eyre Non Partisan
1812 Lord William Bentinck Whig
1814 Frank Frank
(Frank Sotheron)
Tory
1816 Lord William Bentinck Whig
1826 John Lumley [10] Whig
1831 Evelyn Denison Whig
1832 Constituency abolished: see Northern Nottinghamshire, Southern Nottinghamshire

Notes

The use of the term 'Non Partisan' in the list does not necessarily mean that the MP was not associated with a particular party or faction in Parliament. Stooks Smith only gives Nottinghamshire candidates party labels for the contested 1722 election and not again until well into the 19th century.

  1. 1 2 3 4 Members of Parliament 1213-1702. London: House of Commons. 1878.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 "History of Parliament" . Retrieved 5 September 2011.
  3. "MACKERELL, Ralph (d.1436), of Wilsthorpe, Derbys. and Clifton, Notts". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 22 March 2013.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 "History of Parliament" . Retrieved 5 September 2011.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "History of Parliament" . Retrieved 5 September 2011.
  6. Adopted the surname Hewett in 1756
  7. Adopted the surname Pierrepont in 1788
  8. Stooks Smith incorrectly lists Lord Edward Bentinck as re-elected in 1796. In fact he was elected MP for Clitheroe.
  9. Styled Viscount Newark from 1806
  10. Styled Viscount Lumley from June 1832.

Election notes

The county franchise, from 1430, was held by the adult male owners of freehold land valued at 40 shillings or more. Each elector had as many votes as there were seats to be filled. Votes had to be cast by a spoken declaration, in public, at the hustings, which took place in Nottingham. The expense and difficulty of voting at only one location in the county, together with the lack of a secret ballot contributed to the corruption and intimidation of electors, which was widespread in the unreformed British political system.

The expense, to candidates and their supporters, of contested elections encouraged the leading families of the county to agree on the candidates to be returned unopposed whenever possible. Contested county elections were therefore unusual. Three families; the Duke of Newcastle, the Duke of Portland and the Pierreponts, all Whigs, dominated the county until well into the 19th century, which was why there was no contest after 1722.

Duke of Newcastle upon Tyne is a title that has been created three times. The related title Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyme has been created once to provide a slightly more remote special remainder. The title first was conferred in 1665 when William Cavendish was made Duke of Newcastle upon Tyne. He was a prominent Royalist commander in the Civil War. He had already been elevated as Viscount Mansfield in 1620, Baron Cavendish of Bolsover and Earl of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1621 and Marquess of the latter in 1643, and was created Earl of Ogle as main subsidiary title to the dukedom to be used as a courtesy style for his heir presumptive.

The bloc vote electoral system was used in two seat elections and first past the post for single member by-elections. Each voter had up to as many votes as there were seats to be filled. Votes had to be cast by a spoken declaration, in public, at the hustings.

Note on percentage change calculations: Where there was only one candidate of a party in successive elections, for the same number of seats, change is calculated on the party percentage vote. Where there was more than one candidate, in one or both successive elections for the same number of seats, then change is calculated on the individual percentage vote.

Note on sources: The information for the election results given below is taken from Stooks Smith 1715–1754, Namier and Brooke 1754–1790 and Stooks Smith 1790–1832.

Election results 1715–1832

1710s

1720s1730s1740s1750s1760s1770s1780s1790s1790s1800s1810s1820s1830s

Elections in the 1710s

General election 1715: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Francis Willoughby UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan William Levinz UnopposedN/AN/A

Elections in the 1720s

General election 1722: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Robert Sutton 1,34925.89N/A
Whig Emanuel Howe 1,33925.70N/A
Tory William Levinz 1,26524.28N/A
Tory Francis Willoughby 1,25724.13N/A
General election 1727: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Robert Sutton UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Emanuel Howe UnopposedN/AN/A

Elections in the 1730s

By-Election May 1732: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan William Levinz UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Thomas Bennet UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
General election 1734: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan William Levinz (junior) UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Thomas Bennet UnopposedN/AN/A
By-Election February 1739: Nottinghamshire
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan John Mordaunt UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1740s

General election 1741: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan William Levinz (junior) UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan John Mordaunt UnopposedN/AN/A
General election 1747: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Robert Manners-Sutton UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan John Thornhagh UnopposedN/AN/A

Elections in the 1750s

General election 1 May 1754: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Robert Manners-Sutton UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan John Thornhagh UnopposedN/AN/A

Elections in the 1760s

General election 8 April 1761: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Robert Manners-Sutton UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan John Hewett UnopposedN/AN/A
By-Election 13 December 1762: Nottinghamshire
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Thomas Willoughby UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
General election 28 March 1768: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Thomas Willoughby UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan John Hewett UnopposedN/AN/A

Elections in the 1770s

General election 19 October 1774: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Henry Pelham-Clifton UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Thomas Willoughby UnopposedN/AN/A
By-Election 11 January 1775: Nottinghamshire
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Edward Bentinck UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
By-Election 9 December 1778: Nottinghamshire
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Charles Medows UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1780s

General election 13 September 1780: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Edward Bentinck UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Charles Medows UnopposedN/AN/A
General election 21 April 1784: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Edward Bentinck UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Charles Medows UnopposedN/AN/A

Elections in the 1790s

General election 1790: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Edward Bentinck UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Charles Pierrepont UnopposedN/AN/A
General election 1796: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan William Bentinck UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Evelyn Pierrepont UnopposedN/AN/A

Elections in the 1800s

By-Election November 1801: Nottinghamshire
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Charles Pierrepont UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
General election 1802: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan William Bentinck UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Charles Pierrepont UnopposedN/AN/A
By-Election April 1803: Nottinghamshire
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Anthony Eyre UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
General election 1806: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Charles Pierrepont UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Anthony Eyre UnopposedN/AN/A
General election 1807: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Charles Pierrepont UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan Anthony Eyre UnopposedN/AN/A

Elections in the 1810s

General election 1812: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan Charles Pierrepont UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan William Bentinck UnopposedN/AN/A
By-Election April 1814: Nottinghamshire
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Tory Frank Sotheron UnopposedN/AN/A
Tory gain from Non Partisan Swing N/A
By-Election June 1816: Nottinghamshire
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Non Partisan William Bentinck UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
General election 1818: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Tory Frank Sotheron UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan William Bentinck UnopposedN/AN/A

Elections in the 1820s

General election 1818: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Tory Frank Sotheron UnopposedN/AN/A
Non Partisan William Bentinck UnopposedN/AN/A
General election 1826: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Tory Frank Sotheron UnopposedN/AN/A
Whig John Saville Lumley UnopposedN/AN/A

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1830: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Tory Frank Sotheron UnopposedN/AN/A
Whig John Saville Lumley UnopposedN/AN/A
General election 1831: Nottinghamshire (2 seats)
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig John Saville Lumley UnopposedN/AN/A
Whig Evelyn Denison UnopposedN/AN/A

See also

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References