Queen Anne style architecture

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Winslow Hall in Buckinghamshire (1700), possibly by Christopher Wren, has most of the typical features of the original English style Winslow Hall, Sheep Street, Winslow - geograph.org.uk - 2230591.jpg
Winslow Hall in Buckinghamshire (1700), possibly by Christopher Wren, has most of the typical features of the original English style
Hanbury Hall in Worcestershire (c. 1706) is about as large a building as is found in the English Queen Anne style Hanbury Hall 2016.jpg
Hanbury Hall in Worcestershire (c. 1706) is about as large a building as is found in the English Queen Anne style
Douglas House, Petersham, early 18th century Douglas House - geograph.org.uk - 1176148.jpg
Douglas House, Petersham, early 18th century
Bluecoat Chambers in Liverpool (1717), in a version of the original Queen Anne style Bluecoat Chambers - Liverpool.jpg
Bluecoat Chambers in Liverpool (1717), in a version of the original Queen Anne style

The Queen Anne style of British architecture refers to either the English Baroque architecture of the time of Queen Anne (who reigned from 1702 to 1714) or the British Queen Anne Revival form that became popular during the last quarter of the 19th century and the early decades of the 20th century. [1] In other English-speaking parts of the world, New World Queen Anne Revival architecture embodies entirely different styles.

Contents

Overview

With respect to British architecture, the term is mostly used for domestic buildings up to the size of a manor house, and usually designed elegantly but simply by local builders or architects, rather than the grand palaces of noble magnates. The term is not often used for churches. Contrary to the American usage of the term, it is characterised by strongly bilateral symmetry, with an Italianate or Palladian-derived pediment on the front formal elevation.

Colours were made to contrast with the use of carefully chosen red brick for the walls, with details in a lighter stone that is often rather richly carved. Christopher Wren used this technique, which achieved a rich effect for a considerably lower cost than using stone as a facing throughout, in his rebuilding of Hampton Court Palace, commissioned by William and Mary. Here it harmonized well with the remaining Tudor parts of the palace. This highly visible example probably influenced many others.

The architectural historian Marcus Binney, writing in The Times in 2006, describes Poulton House in Poulton, Wiltshire (built in 1706, during the reign of Queen Anne) [2] [3] as "...Queen Anne at its most delightful". Binney lists what he describes as the typical features of the Queen Anne style: [4]

When used of revived "Queen Anne style" of the 19th and 20th centuries, the historic reference in the name should not be taken at all literally, as buildings said to be in the "Queen Anne style" in other parts of the English-speaking world normally bear even less resemblance to English buildings of the early 18th century than those of any style of revival architecture to the original. In particular, Queen Anne style architecture in the United States is a wholly different style, as is that in Australia, and normally includes no elements very typical of the actual architecture of Queen Anne's reign, the names having been devised for marketing purposes.

British Queen Anne Revival

Norman Shaw Buildings, London New Scotland Yard, Victoria Embankment (geograph 5650866).jpg
Norman Shaw Buildings, London

George Devey (1820–1886) and the better-known Norman Shaw (1831–1912) popularized the Queen Anne style of British architecture of the industrial age in the 1870s. Norman Shaw published a book of architectural sketches as early as 1858, and his evocative pen-and-ink drawings began to appear in trade journals and artistic magazines in the 1870s. (American commercial builders quickly adopted the style.)

Shaw's eclectic designs often included Tudor elements, and this "Old English" style also became popular in the United States, where it became known (inaccurately) as the Queen Anne style. Confusion between buildings constructed during the reign of Queen Anne and the "Queen Anne" style still persists, especially in England.

British Victorian Queen Anne architecture empathises more closely with the Arts and Crafts movement than does its American counterpart. A good example is Severalls Hospital in Colchester, Essex (1913–1997), now defunct.

The historic precedents of the architectural style were broad and several:

In the 20th century, Edwin Lutyens and others used an elegant version of the style, usually with red-brick walls contrasting with pale stone details.

New World Queen Anne Revival

The Carson Mansion, located in Eureka, California, is widely considered to be one of the most extreme examples of American Queen Anne style. Carson mansion.jpg
The Carson Mansion, located in Eureka, California, is widely considered to be one of the most extreme examples of American Queen Anne style.

United States

House in the Old West End District (Toledo, Ohio), a district with many more simple examples 2268 Robinwood Avenue, exterior views, 2019 - DPLA - 116a9525a03964a7074977558bfa0464 (page 3) (cropped).jpg
House in the Old West End District (Toledo, Ohio), a district with many more simple examples

In the United States, "Queen Anne" is used to describe a wide range of picturesque buildings with "free Renaissance" (non-Gothic Revival architecture) details and as an alternative both to the French-derived Second Empire and the less "domestic" Beaux-Arts architecture, is broadly applied to architecture, furniture, and decorative arts of the period 1880 to 1910; some "Queen Anne" architectural elements, such as the wraparound front porch, continued to be found into the 1920s.

The gabled and domestically scaled style arrived in New York City with the new housing for the New York House and School of Industry Sidney V. Stratton, architect, 1878). Distinctive features of American Queen Anne architecture may include an asymmetrical façade; dominant front-facing gable, often cantilevered out beyond the plane of the wall below; overhanging eaves; round, square, or polygonal tower(s); shaped and Dutch gables; a porch covering part or all of the front facade, including the primary entrance area; a second-story porch or balconies; pedimented porches; differing wall textures, such as patterned wood shingles shaped into varying designs, including resembling fish scales, terra cotta tiles, relief panels, or wooden shingles over brickwork, etc.; dentils; classical columns; spindle work; oriel and bay windows; horizontal bands of leaded windows; monumental chimneys; painted balustrades; and wooden or slate roofs. Front gardens often had wooden fences. [5]

Australia

The APA Building in Melbourne, circa 1900. It was Australia's tallest building from its completion in 1889 to 1912 and was demolished in 1980. The Australia (APA) Building, Melbourne.jpg
The APA Building in Melbourne, circa 1900. It was Australia's tallest building from its completion in 1889 to 1912 and was demolished in 1980.

In Australia the influence of Richard Norman Shaw [6] contributed to the development of the Federation style, of which the heyday lasted from 1890 to 1915, and which is subdivided into twelve phases, Federation Queen Anne being one and the most popular style for houses built between 1890 and 1910. [7] The style often utilised Tudor-style woodwork and elaborate fretwork that replaced the Victorian taste for wrought iron. Verandahs were usually a feature, as were the image of the rising sun and Australian wildlife; plus circular windows, turrets and towers with conical or pyramid-shaped roofs.

Amesbury a Queen Anne Style house in the Sydney suburb of Ashfield (1)Amesbury 033.jpg
Amesbury a Queen Anne Style house in the Sydney suburb of Ashfield
Queen Anne styled mansion located in South Yarra, Victoria. Federation style mansion in domain street south yarra.jpg
Queen Anne styled mansion located in South Yarra, Victoria.

The first Queen Anne house in Australia was Caerleon in the suburb of Bellevue Hill, New South Wales. [8] Caerleon was designed initially by a Sydney architect, Harry Kent, but was then substantially reworked in London by Maurice Adams. [9] This led to some controversy over who deserved the credit. The house was built in 1885 and was the precursor for the Federation Queen Anne house that was to become so popular. The APA Building in the Melbourne city centre was an example of the Queen Anne style being used for non-residential purposes, though at some stage the building may have been apartments. It was demolished in 1981 after the modernism boom in Melbourne took off–factors that sealed its demolition included rapacious development, lax heritage attitudes in Australian cities, and the owner's own decision to argue for a demolition permit which was granted.

Caerleon was followed soon after by West Maling, in the suburb of Penshurst, New South Wales, [10] and Annesbury, in the suburb of Ashfield, New South Wales, both built circa 1888. These houses, although built around the same time, had distinct styles, West Maling displaying a robust Tudor influence that was not present in Annesbury. The style soon became increasingly popular, appealing predominantly to reasonably well-off people with an "Establishment" leaning. [11]

The style as it developed in Australia was highly eclectic, blending Queen Anne elements with various Australian influences. Old English characteristics like ribbed chimneys and gabled roofs were combined with Australian aspects like encircling verandahs, designed to keep the sun out. One outstanding example of this eclectic approach is Urrbrae House, in the Adelaide suburb of Urrbrae, South Australia, part of the Waite Institute. Another variation with connections to the Federation Queen Anne style was the Federation Bungalow, featuring extended verandahs. This style generally incorporated familiar Queen Anne elements, but usually in simplified form.

Some prominent examples are: [12]

See also

Related Research Articles

Victorian architecture Series of architectural revival styles

Victorian architecture is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. Victorian refers to the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901), called the Victorian era, during which period the styles known as Victorian were used in construction. However, many elements of what is typically termed "Victorian" architecture did not become popular until later in Victoria's reign, roughly from 1850 and later. The styles often included interpretations and eclectic revivals of historic styles. The name represents the British and French custom of naming architectural styles for a reigning monarch. Within this naming and classification scheme, it followed Georgian architecture and later Regency architecture, and was succeeded by Edwardian architecture.

Veranda Roofed, open-air gallery or porch

A veranda or verandah is a roofed, open-air gallery or porch, attached to the outside of a building. A veranda is often partly enclosed by a railing and frequently extends across the front and sides of the structure.

Victorian house

In Great Britain and former British colonies, a Victorian house generally means any house built during the reign of Queen Victoria. During the Industrial Revolution, successive housing booms resulted in the building of many millions of Victorian houses which are now a defining feature of most British towns and cities.

Tudor Revival architecture Architectural style

Tudor Revival architecture first manifested itself in domestic architecture in the United Kingdom in the latter half of the 19th century. Based on revival of aspects that were perceived as Tudor architecture, in reality it usually took the style of English vernacular architecture of the Middle Ages that had survived into the Tudor period. The style later became an influence elsewhere, especially the British colonies. For example, in New Zealand, the architect Francis Petre adapted the style for the local climate. In Singapore, then a British colony, architects such as R. A. J. Bidwell pioneered what became known as the Black and White House. The earliest examples of the style originate with the works of such eminent architects as Norman Shaw and George Devey, in what at the time was considered Neo-Tudor design.

Architecture of Sydney Overview of the architecture in Sydney

The architecture of Sydney, Australia’s oldest city, is not characterised by any one architectural style, but by an extensive juxtaposition of old and new architecture over the city's 200-year history, from its modest beginnings with local materials and lack of international funding to its present-day modernity with an expansive skyline of high rises and skyscrapers, dotted at street level with remnants of a Victorian era of prosperity.

Architecture of Australia Overview of the architecture in Australia

Architecture of Australia has generally been consistent with architectural trends in the wider Western world, with some special adaptations to compensate for distinctive Australian climatic and cultural factors. Indigenous Australians produced a wide range of structures and places prior to colonisation. Contemporary Indigenous practitioners are active in a broad range of built environment fields. During Australia's early Western history, it was a collection of British colonies in which architectural styles were strongly influenced by British designs. However, the unique climate of Australia necessitated adaptations, and 20th-century trends reflected the increasing influence of American urban designs and a diversification of the cultural tastes and requirements of an increasingly multicultural Australian society.

Australian residential architectural styles

Australian residential architectural styles have evolved significantly over time, from the early days of structures made from relatively cheap and imported corrugated iron to more sophisticated styles borrowed from other countries, such as the Victorian style from the United Kingdom, the Georgian style from North America and Europe and the Californian bungalow from the United States. A common feature of the Australian home is the use of fencing in front gardens, also common in both the UK and the US.

Australian non-residential architectural styles are a set of Australian architectural styles that apply to buildings used for purposes other than residence and have been around only since the first colonial government buildings of early European settlement of Australia in 1788.

Federation architecture

Federation architecture is the architectural style in Australia that was prevalent from around 1890 to 1915. The name refers to the Federation of Australia on 1 January 1901, when the Australian colonies collectively became the Commonwealth of Australia.

Appian Way, Burwood

Appian Way is a street located in the suburb of Burwood in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Terraced houses in Australia

Terraced houses in Australia refers almost exclusively to Victorian and Edwardian era terraced houses or replicas almost always found in the older, inner city areas of the major cities, mainly Sydney and Melbourne. Terraced housing was introduced to Australia in the 19th century. Their architectural work was based on those in London and Paris, which had the style a century earlier.

Polychrome brickwork Use of bricks of different colours for decoration

Polychrome brickwork is a style of architectural brickwork wherein bricks of different colours are used to create decorative patterns or highlight architectural features in the walls of a building. Historically it was used in the late Gothic period in Europe, and the Tudor period in England, and was revived in Britain in the 1850s as a feature of Gothic Revival architecture. Later in the 19th century and into the early 20th century it was adopted in various forms in Europe for all manner of buildings such as French eclectic villas, Dutch row houses, and German railway stations, and as far away as Melbourne, Australia, where the technique reached heights of popularity and elaboration in the 1880s.

Beverley Ussher was articled to Melbourne architect Alfred Dunn. Dunn was English and had worked for architect Alexander Lauder in Barnstaple, Devon, where he worked with Arts and Crafts movement theorist and practitioner W.R. Lethaby. Through Dunn's English connections, when Ussher completed his architecture articles in Melbourne, he visited England and was introduced to architect Walter Butler. Later Ussher and Butler formed a partnership in Melbourne.

New World Queen Anne Revival architecture

In the New World, Queen Anne Revival was a historicist architectural style of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It was popular in the United States, Canada, Australia, and other countries. In Australia, it is also called Federation architecture.

Casino Post Office

Casino Post Office is a heritage-listed post office at 102 Barker Street, Casino, Richmond Valley Council, New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by the NSW Colonial Architect's Office and built from 1879. The property is owned by Australia Post. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 23 June 2000.

West Maling

West Maling is a heritage-listed former residence and now ecclesiastical centre and administration building located at 663-665 King Georges Road, Penshurst, Georges River Council, New South Wales, Australia. Its design is attributed to Richard Norman Shaw who is likely to have influenced its design, and built by Charles Halstead the supervising architect. It is also known as West Maling and Weigall House. The property is owned by Australian Evangelist Association. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Whitley, Sutton Forest

Whitley is a heritage-listed residence at 217 Oldbury Road, Sutton Forest, Wingecarribee Shire, New South Wales, Australia. It was built from 1887 to 1892. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Premier Street Sewer Vent and Cottages

Premier Street Sewer Vent and Cottages is a heritage-listed sewer vent and cottages at 24 and 26 Premier Street, Marrickville, Inner West Council, New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by the New South Wales Public Works Department, which built it from 1898 to 1900. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 15 November 2002.

Burwood Post Office

The Burwood Post Office is a heritage-listed former Aboriginal land, farm and former post office and now unused retail building located at 168a Burwood Road in the Sydney suburb of Burwood in the Municipality of Burwood local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by Walter Liberty Vernon and George Oakeshott and built by New South Wales Works Branch. It is also known as Burwood Post Office (former). It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 18 May 2001.

Lynton, Burwood

Lynton is a heritage-listed residence located at 4 Clarence Street in the Sydney suburb of Burwood in the Municipality of Burwood local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by Stanley Rickard and built from 1906. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

References

  1. Cambridge Encyclopedia, Crystal (Cambridge University Press) 1994, p. 69
  2. Poulton House
  3. Pevsner, Nikolaus; Cherry, Bridget (revision) (1975) [1963]. Wiltshire. The Buildings of England (2nd ed.). Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. p. 336. ISBN   0-14-0710-26-4.
  4. The Times , "Bricks and Mortar" Supplement, 5 May 2006, pp. 6–7.
  5. "Queen Anne Style". buffaloah.com.
  6. A Pictorial Guide to Identifying Australian Architecture, Apperly (Angus and Robertson) 1994, p.132
  7. A Pictorial Guide to Identifying Australian Architecture, p. 132
  8. The Federation House, Hugh Fraser (New Holland) 2002, p. 24
  9. Sydney Architecture, Graham Jahn (Watermark Press) 1997, p. 62
  10. Heritage branch | NSW Environment & Heritage
  11. The Federation House, p. 22
  12. A Pictorial Guide to Identifying Australian Architecture, pp. 132–135
  13. "Caerleon – house, grounds (Full LEP listing – Description in Further Comments) | NSW Environment & Heritage". www.environment.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 2019-08-15.
  14. Sydney Morning Herald, January 25, 2008, p. 3
  15. "Wikispaces". federation-house.wikispaces.com. Retrieved 2019-08-15.
  16. "Dalswraith | Melbourne Buildings | Adam Dimech". www.adonline.id.au. Retrieved 2019-08-15.
  17. "Wikispaces". federation-house.wikispaces.com. Retrieved 2019-08-15.

Further reading